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can you make a quartz crystal vibrate?


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#1 the guy

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 02:03 PM

if you take an ordinary quartz crystal and apply a voltage to it, will it vibrate?

if not, how do you make it oscillate? and will it be enough that you can feel it?
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#2 swansont

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:16 PM

Yes you can make it vibrate; what you want to do is have an amplifier circuit with feedback, where the potential across the crystal is part of a capacitor, so the RC circuit has a resonance. That way you can tune the resistor (or a second capacitor) so that the voltage oscillates at the same frequency as the crystal. There are a lot of different circuit designs that will do this.

You probably can't feel the DC displacement, but it will buzz if the frequency is high enough buzzers use piezoelectric transducers. The displacement is small, but you can stack many of them together. The stack actuators I'm familiar with have a travel of less than 1 mm.
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#3 Ophiolite

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:35 PM

As a geologist my natural approach would be to hit it with a hammer.
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#4 the guy

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 08:39 PM

thankyou, could you give an example of a simple circuit design?

and haha ophiolite :lol:

also, what happens if alternating current is used?
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#5 swansont

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 12:14 AM

Google on crystal oscillator circuit. There are many types.
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#6 the guy

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 10:33 AM

ok thanks
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#7 timetes

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 02:39 AM

if you take an ordinary quartz crystal and apply a voltage to it, will it vibrate?

if not, how do you make it oscillate? and will it be enough that you can feel it?



and can you do it from a distance? like...remotely? shut it on and off? it may be a silly question but are these crystals in voting machines? I know they use them in humans for medical purposes........
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#8 swansont

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 09:51 AM

and can you do it from a distance? like...remotely? shut it on and off? it may be a silly question but are these crystals in voting machines? I know they use them in humans for medical purposes........

You could turn the circuit on and off remotely. Any electronics with its own processor will have a clocking circuit.
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#9 TonyMcC

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 04:41 PM

Yes you can make it vibrate; what you want to do is have an amplifier circuit with feedback, where the potential across the crystal is part of a capacitor, so the RC circuit has a resonance. That way you can tune the resistor (or a second capacitor) so that the voltage oscillates at the same frequency as the crystal. There are a lot of different circuit designs that will do this.

You probably can't feel the DC displacement, but it will buzz if the frequency is high enough buzzers use piezoelectric transducers. The displacement is small, but you can stack many of them together. The stack actuators I'm familiar with have a travel of less than 1 mm.


Did you mean "tune an INDUCTOR (or capacitor)"? A crystal is usually accurately cut to oscillate at a given frequency or one of its harmonics. That manufactured frequency can be changed a certain amount with a tuned circuit - but only by so much. The resonant frequency of a tuned circuit is 1/(2*pi*(SQR(L*C))) Hz. I have never experienced an oscillator circuit that was tuned to a different frequency by changing resistance.
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#10 timetes

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 05:36 PM

could that be why so many people today are hearing ringing or humming in their ears? and Ophio's comment.....lolol ....why hitting it with a hammer..lol.... is that what a bug is made out of lol.....when they say if walls could talk...lol

last question:.....how would anyone detect one...... like if your going thru an airport....could one be detected in a human going thru a scanner.....or that scanner affect that person....like shutting it off or vibrating it....especially if its a heart monitor......

Did you mean "tune an INDUCTOR (or capacitor)"? A crystal is usually accurately cut to oscillate at a given frequency or one of its harmonics. That manufactured frequency can be changed a certain amount with a tuned circuit - but only by so much. The resonant frequency of a tuned circuit is 1/(2*pi*(SQR(L*C))) Hz. I have never experienced an oscillator circuit that was tuned to a different frequency by changing resistance.



since the crystal oscillates at its given frequency or harmonics..........what would happen if someone with one of these crystals was sitting watching a movie with surround sound with all the vibrations included in that moving........ wouldnt or couldnt that circuit be affected by that frequency?
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#11 swansont

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 05:55 PM

Did you mean "tune an INDUCTOR (or capacitor)"? A crystal is usually accurately cut to oscillate at a given frequency or one of its harmonics. That manufactured frequency can be changed a certain amount with a tuned circuit - but only by so much. The resonant frequency of a tuned circuit is 1/(2*pi*(SQR(L*C))) Hz. I have never experienced an oscillator circuit that was tuned to a different frequency by changing resistance.


Yeah, brainfart. R doesn't affect the resonance.
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#12 timetes

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 03:15 AM

ok..... like in a remote control........i picked up a universal remote for an old tv...... i had to keep repeating the signal till it picked up the tv signal number. So is that remote a signal generator or a frequency generator? Why would a magnet repel the wave or frequency . Wondering if the oscillation would change the repelling?

Whats the difference from a RF and a microwave frequency? is it the heat? again wondering if the oscillation causes the heat? Just a question because these vibrations i've been getting......and zaps......... i was holding the remote while on the cell phone and the remote vibrated and i dropped it......... what would cause that.

One last question: can a rf wave cause an electrical wave current?......kind of like two electrical wires causing a magnetic wave.
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