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What materials can X-Rays not pass through?


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#1 bridgey

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:01 AM

I've been researching for a while now but i can't find anything that answers my question.

I'd like to know what are the radiopaque materials? That is, which materials can x-rays not pass through?


Thanks in advance.
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#2 5614

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 08:34 AM

I don't know but a google search came up with barium sulphate.
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#3 YT2095

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 08:39 AM

yeah, Barium Sulphate`s a good one, but the original question is still too vague in the respect that there`s no mention of Power levels or Type, such as Hard or Soft X-Rays, one could argue that Lead is another Blocker, but then that`s only partly true also, as it`s efficiency depends upon many other factors.
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#4 5614

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 09:00 AM

You could also argue that a blackhole is radiopaque ;)
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#5 YT2095

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 09:23 AM

I`ll bring that up the next time I see a Radiologist for an X-Ray :P
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#6 swansont

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 10:21 AM

As YT said, the energy matters, but nothing is actually opaque, really; it's a matter of being more or less transparent. In terms of e.g. taking an x-ray picture, you get contrast so the film is more or less exposed, and materials like lead will be better at shielding, but some fraction of x-rays will pass through, depending on the thickness (it's an exponential function, e^{-\lambda L} ).

If you want materials that are good at stopping x-rays, you want a large linear attenuation coefficient, \lambda
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#7 RyanJ

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 11:43 AM

I've been researching for a while now but i can't find anything that answers my question.

I'd like to know what are the radiopaque materials? That is, which materials can x-rays not pass through?


Thanks in advance.


Theoretically anything as long as there is enough of it :-)

Cheers,

Ryan Jones
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#8 sunspot

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 11:56 PM

When I worked in Oak Ridge, our sister plant, the National Lab, had a swimming pool where they put hot/radioactive stuff from their experimental reactor. It was sort of weird walking along the catwalk and seeing the things glowing blue under the water. I believe about 20 ft or so of water is sufficient as an radiation shield including X-rays. This taught me a strategy if there ever was a nuclear incident nearby. If deep water is available, dive as deep as possible.

Another good shield is lead. If one gets an X-ray, this provides the family jewels some protection. Berylium is also good.

#9 swansont

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 01:00 AM

Another good shield is lead. If one gets an X-ray, this provides the family jewels some protection. Berylium is also good.


Berylium? Is this the same Berylium that has an attenuation coefficient of about 0.25/cm at 100 keV (as compared to Pb, with a value of 50/cm)?
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#10 Nevermore

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 01:50 AM

I think he meant barium.
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#11 jdurg

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 03:33 PM

Pretty much any heavy, dense metal (or in some cases metal salts) will be good at blocking radiation. Uranium metal is actually VERY good at blocking gamma rays and x-rays, ironically enough.
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#12 YT2095

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 05:19 PM

I think he meant barium.


or perhaps Bismuth? I think I`de trust that alot more out of the "B" letter metals :)
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#13 ecoli

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 03:39 AM

about a foot of concrete would work too.
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#14 washim

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 01:28 PM

I want no about materials which has very low X Ray absorbing property. The material should be transparent like glass. It has to be safe for medical instrument
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#15 swansont

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 07:28 PM

X-rays are ionizing radiation. You'll want something with a low atomic density and low atomic number to minimize the number of potential targets.
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