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Matt Patterson

Are glass batteries a hoax?

33 posts in this topic

That makes no difference. They can cancel each other out when parallel as well. Angular momentum doesn't have a position, only an orientation.

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Posted (edited)

Yep, I looked and it's correct. Which seems to negate the objection to flywheels being used to supply power to vehicles.

It makes it more complicated, but it shouldn't wear out your tyres or make you go straight when you turn the wheel.

Nice illustration of it on youtube :

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGun5athdfg

 

Edit. I guess that maybe the forces on the bearings might be prohibitive. Although wheel bearings seem to take plenty of force in their lifetimes.

Edited by mistermack
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Yes, the point I was trying to make is that you have to engineer the system to deal with it (rigidly support the two counter-rotating wheels), and said engineering adds extra weight, cost, and so on. You're right - it shouldn't wear out your tires; the gyro effects would be "contained" by the supporting structure.

 

Another thing you have to keep in mind is what's going to happen if a flywheel fails; those tend to be rather violent events. So you'd also need a containment system, and that adds weight and cost as well. But of course all of these technologies have risks (gasoline can explode too).

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Posted (edited)

Stable levitation of one magnet by another with no energy input is usually prohibited by Earnshaw’s Theorem. However, the introduction of diamagnetic material at special locations can stabilize such levitation. A magnet can even be stably suspended between (diamagnetic) fingertips. A very simple, surprisingly stable room temperature magnet levitation device is described that works without superconductors and requires absolutely no energy input.

 

http://netti.nic.fi/~054028/images/LeviTheory.pdf

 

levidot1s.jpg

 

levidot2s.jpg

 

http://www.physics.ucla.edu/marty/diamag/

 

Are such materials as concrete, asphalt, sand, stone diamagnetics or paramagnetics?

Edited by Moreno
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Probably, I've posted a post in the wrong thread. It belongs to "plasma cushion levitating cars".

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Posted (edited)

Hi...as per my knowledge the problem is that conductivity of solid electrolytes is much lower than conductivity of liquid electrolytes. This is very difficult to change because it is based on physic's laws. Li-ion batteries commonly use organic electrolytes. They may not be too cheap and are flammable, but at least they offer acceptable power densities. With glass electrolytes power may fell below acceptable level.

Edited by RickyTerzis
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