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Condensation Question


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#1 r21g

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 08:38 PM

How can electronics be cooled, to close to freezing temps, without causing condensation?


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#2 MigL

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:06 PM

By freezing temps I assume you mean zero deg C.

Condensation is caused by water vapour in air, and it condenses out when cooled.

Remove the moisture laden air from contact with the electronic components by immersing in a non-conductive oil, and cool the hot components with a water-block with refrigerant going through the lines.

 

Seems excessively elaborate, and if your intention is over-clocking processors, the results aren't worth the effort.


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#3 pavelcherepan

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 03:12 AM

How can electronics be cooled, to close to freezing temps, without causing condensation?

 

By cooling it down in a vacuum. If you look at the phase diagram of water, below 611 Pa liquid phase can not exist any more regardless of the temperature.

 

https://upload.wikim...am_of_water.svg


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#4 John Cuthber

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 08:53 AM

Condensation will take place if enough water vapour comes into contact with a cold surface.

Since you have defined  the temperature, you need to ensure that the water vapour concentration is low enough.

You need a drying agent or a source of gas that's dry- like bottled air or nitrogen.


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