Elite Engineer

Senior Members
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    586
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About Elite Engineer

  • Rank
    Molecule
  • Birthday 11/05/92

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    NY
  • Interests
    philosophy, music, science.
  • College Major/Degree
    BS in Biotechnology,
  • Favorite Area of Science
    Chemistry
  • Biography
    should have gone to school for chemistry... :/
  • Occupation
    Protein Chemist

Recent Profile Visitors

12673 profile views
  1. Why don't light bulbs implode/ break in it contains a vacuum?

    Been thinking about this for a bit since I posted the topic. If you were drop to a glass oval and a glass sphere, from say 50 cm onto a wooden floor, would the oval not shatter but the sphere would? My understanding is that the oval will distribute the force around evenly while the sphere will not
  2. Why don't light bulbs implode/ break in it contains a vacuum?

    Superb explanation!
  3. Obviously light bulbs don't shatter, but my questions is, why DON'T they? What specifically prevents the higher external pressure from caving in the bulb? ~ee
  4. Economic model for Fusion Energy

    If/when fusion energy is actually developed, what would most likely be the economic model? My understand is that if we were to create a fusion process that it would be a plentiful amount, and would be a huge supply. So would energy be cheaper or would it be priced as more expensive? Reasons? ~ee
  5. First female president

    I don't normally post sensitive stuff like this but, one of my friends brought this up, and it would be MIND-BLOWING on either side of the aisle. If Trump were to become transgender, would he technically be the first female president?
  6. Shoemaker Levy comet explosion

    I was reading about the meteor that exploded over Russia in 2013. It's composition was only 10% iron..so it seems that meteors composed of mostly dust and ice will either burn up in the atmosphere or explode. Higher compositions of iron (guess...> 50%) may make it to the surface.
  7. Shoemaker Levy comet explosion

    I mean, the general average composition. If I recall, the Meteor crater in Arizona was mined because scientists believed it was made of iron. I would imagine an asteroid composed mostly of ice wouldn't hold up against the atmosphere. We're talking more hardy asteroids..i.e. Iron, Magnesium, etc. All of this in a physics perspective.
  8. So I've been on a astrophysics bender the last week. Found out about Shoemaker levy, the asteroid that collided into Jupiter's atmosphere and exploded. My question/thought is: Can asteroids also explode on impact with our atmopshere, if they're going fast enough. SML was traveling at 35mi/sec, so when it hit, it was completely obliterated. Is there a flatline of where an asteroid travels too fast that simply disintergrates on impact with our atmopshere? ~ee
  9. well I'm sure the live or partially dead vaccines are efficient. It's just the vaccines that use a few proteins from the bacteria, like the vaccine for Lyme disease that used DbpA and OspC.
  10. Vaccinations can be as low as 40% effectiveness and as high as 95%. In thinking of ways to raise the efficiency of vaccines with < 50% prevention, wouldn't it be more advantageous to use part of a whole cell lysate (taking out the bad stuff) than using a handful of proteins that produce immunogenicity? At least this way, you're catching all the small interactions with cell components/ proteins that you would miss with just using a surface protein or flagellin. Sure, you may raise the immune reaction a bit, and produce an elevated fever, but this would be common place in time. If you get a colonoscopy (very short procedure) you're out of commission for the whole day. your thoughts? ~EE
  11. Vaccinations can be as low as 40% effectiveness and as high as 95%. In thinking of ways to raise the efficiency of vaccines with < 50% prevention, wouldn't it be more advantageous to use part of a whole cell lysate (taking out the bad stuff) than using a handful of proteins that produce immunogenicity? At least this way, you're catching all the small interactions with cell components/ proteins that you would miss with just using a surface protein or flagellin. Sure, you may raise the immune reaction a bit, and produce an elevated fever, but this would be common place in time. If you get a colonoscopy (very short procedure) you're out of commission for the whole day. your thoughts? ~EE
  12. Hi all, So I'm helping my niece develop a science fair project (7th grade). She wants to calculate how much power she can generate by running a specific distance My question is, is there any difference in calculating the power (Work/time) via staircase vs. flat distance. I ask this, because in most of the physics examples I've seen that calculate human horsepower, they're usually done with a stair case, and the distance is measured by height of the staircase, and the force is the runner's weight in newtons. The staircase method is kind of annoying and would be easier for her to do with just running on a track field. Is there anything I should know about that's different between the height and the flat distance calculations? I don't think there is, but just want to check. ~ee
  13. But is this done while the individual is still an embryo? What about grown people who already have the the full genetic disease?
  14. It pains me to see people suffering from debilitating genetic diseases, where (if their lucky) the only treatment is to mildly reduce the symptoms. Maybe not now or even in 20 years, but is there any possibility that an individuals genetic errors could be fixed? I really can't think of any mechanism that could do this, even in a far-reaching theory. Your thoughts? ~ee