Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
chemguy

A Modified EFE

Recommended Posts

The Einstein Field Equation (EFE) contains scalars and tensors. The EFE may be modified if the following substitutions are applied;

 

- A tensor is represented as a four vector product of acceleration (arithmetic product)

- The Ricci Scalar is represented as a scalar ratio of areas

- The Einstein constant is represented as ratios of Plank units

A field operator may be defined as a “four dot multiplier”. If the field operator acts upon the modified EFE, the result will be a scalar field equation (SFE) representing field strength. The SFE may also be written as an equation of “average field strength” (AFE).

 

If “Schwarzschild conditions” apply, the SFE will reduce to the Schwarzschild metric. It follows that flat space-time is represented as the Minkowski metric.

 

An emitter has both mass and an emissive surface area. If the mass/area ratio acts upon the SFE, then the SFE will transform to a scalar equation of stress (SSE). Stress may be represented as shear or as pressure. If “radiant conditions” apply, then the SSE may be simply related to black body radiation.

 

blog link deleted by mod

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

!

Moderator Note

Posting just to advertise your blog is against the rules. If you want to discuss something, do it here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If “Schwarzschild conditions” apply, the SFE will reduce to the Schwarzschild metric.

 

Can you show this?

 

Also, even if a the gravitational field outside a spherically symmetric, unchanging mass can be modelled with your equation that doesn't say anything about the more general EFE.

 

 

It follows that flat space-time is represented as the Minkowski metric.

 

That was already know, wasn't it?

 

 

If “radiant conditions” apply, then the SSE may be simply related to black body radiation.

 

What are the "radiant conditions"?

Can you show how this relates to black body radiation. Does this have the same temperature as Hawking radiation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.