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Hydrogen Peroxide


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i once saw an experiment with H202 which made me remeber the name... it must have been something cool :rolleyes: but now i cant remember what,

 

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is something you can buy at the drug store. What you are buying is a 3-percent solution, meaning the bottle contains 97-percent water and 3-percent hydrogen peroxide. Most people use it as an antiseptic. It turns out that it is not very good as an antiseptic, but it is not bad for washing cuts and scrapes and the foaming looks cool.

 

so knowing this, assuming its cheap;

 

1) what can i do with hydrogen peroxide H202?

 

2) how can i seperate it from the water? evaporation?

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Acids will eat almost everything if you add hydrogen peroxide into solution. You can also bleach some dyes with H2O2. Concentrated H2O2 is usually made by low temperature boiling in vacuum but it can also be done (in some extent) by freesing solution. Concentrated H2O2 is quite dangerous substance though. It can exploe if your lab kit is not clean enough and it is very caustic.

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If you add it to acid you will got something like stronger acid. Explosion may result if concentrated H2O2 gets in contact with organic compunds because it is very strong oxidiser but i do not know has it ever used for pyro stuff by anyone.

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so if i put a plant in a bowl of hydrogen peroxide you reckon there will be a violent reaction, i somehow dont think so:

 

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is something you can buy at the drug store. What you are buying is a 3-percent solution, meaning the bottle contains 97-percent water and 3-percent hydrogen peroxide. Most people use it as an antiseptic. It turns out that it is not very good as an antiseptic, but it is not bad for washing cuts and scrapes and the foaming looks cool.

 

although this is a weak solution, it is highly unlikely a solution like what you are describing would be used in a drug such as this, which seems to be a common household medicine.

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1) what can i do with hydrogen peroxide H202?

 

2) how can i seperate it from the water? evaporation?

you can oxidize things with the peroxide. it works like permanganates, halates, perhalates, etc, but is not quite as powerful. if you want to make a crazy acid and i mean CRAZY (it's called pirhana bath), just add it (slowly) to sulfuric acid. the more conc the sulfuric the more crazy your solution will be. you get peroxymonosulfuric acid, which tears through flesh like pirahnas and acts as a good solvent and oxidizing agent.

 

to concentrate it, just freeze; water freezes at 0 celcius, while H2O2 freezes at -11 celcius.

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to concentrate it, just freeze; water freezes at 0 Celsius, while H2O2 freezes at -11 Celsius.

 

I think that if you keep refreezing and draining it a bunch of times you should be able to get it pretty pure…

 

so if I put a plant in a bowl of hydrogen peroxide you reckon there will be a violent reaction, i somehow dont think so

 

He was talking about pure H2O2. Pure H2O2 can burn and bleach your skin.

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If you add it to acid you will got something like stronger acid. Explosion may result if concentrated H2O2 gets in contact with organic compunds because it is very strong oxidiser but i do not know has it ever used for pyro stuff by anyone.

Actually, the Germans used it and alcohol as fuel in the ME-163.

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it`s the stuff that "leaked" out of a deisel torpedo engine, that started a fire on the Kirsk too :(

 

here`s a clasical experiment you can try though.

pour half of it into a larger plastic bottle, add a little Manganese dioxide and put the lid on with a tube coming off it, capture this gas in a test tube.

set fire to a small peice of wood, then blow the flame out leaving just the glowing part, then quickly put that into you test tube of captured gas and see the result :)

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actually you want to be very careful with it. if you get above 70% H2O2, anything organic or metallic will detonate it. yes, a speck of dust will detonate it.

 

now this is sounding like fun... a speck of dust, so theoretically it would have to be in a complete vacum otherwise it is highly likely that it will explode?

 

how can i get H202 in that pure-er state?

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the [math]H_2O_2[/math] releases [math]O_2[/math] on decomposition because of an organic or metal catalyst. the metal/organic catalyst reduces the peroxide, which yields enough energy to cause decomposition.

 

see my above post; to concentrate it, put it into a freezer. water freezes at 0 celcius while [math]H_2O_2[/math]freezes at -11 celcius.

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and then what makes it soo reactive?

 

is there a better way to explode it, other than dust!?

 

how pure does the H202 need to be to make an explosion? it comes in a 3% H202 and 97% H20 in medicine you can get in chemists, how can i get rid of the water only? evaporate it?

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and then what makes it soo reactive?

well, think of water. it is [math]H_2O[/math] and it is very stable.

think of oxygen. it is, well, an OXIDIZING agent. in fact, the second most effective oxidizer of all the elements. now, when you think of peroxides, do you think of highly explosive unstable oxidizing agents of death? i most certainly do. so, it works well for hydrogen peroxide.

 

how pure does the H202 need to be to make an explosion? it comes in a 3% H202 and 97% H20 in medicine you can get in chemists, how can i get rid of the water only? evaporate it?

if you get 70% that is as far as you'd conceivably want to go. at 70% it blows up on contact with any metal or organic. if you want to make a really, really crazy reaction, just add a strong reducing agent, like, say, an alkali/alkaline earth metal. lithium borohydride, anybody? cheers!

 

if you want to know how to concentrate it, i refuse to tell you again. i have mentioned how to do so twice already.

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budullewraag, i have one simple question....for someone who is in HS...how in the name of christ do you know all this stuff....even my HS chem teacher who had a masters in chemistry, didnt seem as knowledgeable in the field as you are...so explain it to me...without any post HS schooling, how is it that you know what you do about chemistry?

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oh man, i am so flattered. thanks for the compliment.

 

answering your question, i read. a lot. along with that, i'm a member of these forums AND 2 other chem specific forums, and i talk with chemists often. it's difficult to describe, but i've always had an affinity for chem. i see the world in atoms and molecules :)

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"i see the world in atoms and molecules :)"

 

Don't we all? :) I just wondered about the chemical composition of marshamallows one day, and always when I see a rock lying about I wonder how much uranium is in there (sadly, Finland's base rock has LOTS of uranium. We're exposed to much more radon than you guys :< ).

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"After I graduate I’m going on a uranium prospecting trip in New Mexico."

 

*Sigh* If there's something I like more than explosives or acids, it's radioactive elements. Sadly, the uranium is mostly all over Finland, and in very few concentrations; no prospecting trips for me. :( (Unless I happen to visit USA someday)

 

By the way, anyone happen to know where I could get beryllium-uranium allanite, or "muromontite"? I think it's the only natural mineral where plutonium is existant. I think there was a mine in Sweden that had plenty of it... Too bad it closed after WW2 or something.

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dude...even the way you talk(type in this case) its like...you have the intellectuality of a 40-something seasoned scientist. i must say, im quite amazed at your ability to deduce and solve complex problems that involve different elements. if you dont have a scholorship to MIT...well, then they havent found you yet.

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