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Electricity using low grade heat


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I am an Indian inventor. For a long time, I am continuing personal research about a theoretical machine that can extract atmospheric heat and convert that into useful power. Recently, while searching net, I have found out that the necessary machinery is already available in market. In short, the machine now can be built easily. It's a combination of a market available blower with a new kind of turbine. The turbine has already been built and tested. A 1 meter diameter turbine can generate 3 kW output at 8 m/s wind velocity. While a market available 1 meter diameter and 50% efficient blower can generate 8 m/s airflow at the expense of just 500 W.

I now want to further develop this technology by collaborating with a company/startup. If anybody can help me in any way, kindly inbox me.

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6 minutes ago, RevI said:

I am an Indian inventor. For a long time, I am continuing personal research about a theoretical machine that can extract atmospheric heat and convert that into useful power. Recently, while searching net, I have found out that the necessary machinery is already available in market. In short, the machine now can be built easily. It's a combination of a market available blower with a new kind of turbine. The turbine has already been built and tested. A 1 meter diameter turbine can generate 3 kW output at 8 m/s wind velocity. While a market available 1 meter diameter and 50% efficient blower can generate 8 m/s airflow at the expense of just 500 W.

I now want to further develop this technology by collaborating with a company/startup. If anybody can help me in any way, kindly inbox me.

Yes indeed it is possible to extract energy from the air.

Wind turbines can turn this into electricity.

Windmills or windpumps can turn this into useful work.

Air pressure can be use this to raise and lower large steel pressure chambers or 'gasometers'.

Heat pumps can turn this into useful heat.

But none of these directly fit your description which appears to violate the First Law of Thermodynamics.

 

Members here will happily discuss your invention and perhaps help you towards a practical revision that would actually function.

 

I suggest you start by understanding the difference between loaded and unloaded machinery, both electrical and mechanical, and the importance of flow rate to the output of machinery.

 

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26 minutes ago, RevI said:

. A 1 meter diameter turbine can generate 3 kW output at 8 m/s wind velocity.

If the equation given here

https://www.raeng.org.uk/publications/other/23-wind-turbine

is correct, the available power for a 1 metre radius wind turbine in air with a density of 1.2 kg/m^3 travelling at 8 m/s is is 381 Watts.
For a 1 metre diameter blade the available power is 95 watts.

 

28 minutes ago, RevI said:

If anybody can help me in any way, kindly inbox me.

I can't be bothered to inbox you, but the best help I can offer is "check your maths".

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40 minutes ago, RevI said:

I am an Indian inventor. For a long time, I am continuing personal research about a theoretical machine that can extract atmospheric heat and convert that into useful power. Recently, while searching net, I have found out that the necessary machinery is already available in market. In short, the machine now can be built easily. It's a combination of a market available blower with a new kind of turbine. The turbine has already been built and tested. A 1 meter diameter turbine can generate 3 kW output at 8 m/s wind velocity. While a market available 1 meter diameter and 50% efficient blower can generate 8 m/s airflow at the expense of just 500 W.

I now want to further develop this technology by collaborating with a company/startup. If anybody can help me in any way, kindly inbox me.

When you say your proposed machine converts atmospheric heat in useful power (electricity I suppose), where is the waste heat rejected? Into water cooler than the air, or something?    

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10 minutes ago, Ken Fabian said:

There were solar updraft towers proposals around, warming the air in a flared "hothouse" base. Is that what Revl has in mind?

440px-SolarChimneyManzanares_view_from_8

 

Other ways of using low grade heat to make mechanical movement or electricity include stirling engines and thermocouples.

Thanks for posting this. I was scratching my head thinking I had read something about chimneys. But they seem to need to be very tall, and are even more of a blot on the landscape than wind turbines. I wonder what sort of payback time they achieve and how they compare in Watts/m² with solar panels these days.  

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On 5/13/2021 at 1:22 PM, exchemist said:

Thanks for posting this. I was scratching my head thinking I had read something about chimneys. But they seem to need to be very tall, and are even more of a blot on the landscape than wind turbines. I wonder what sort of payback time they achieve and how they compare in Watts/m² with solar panels these days.  

Natural draught is used extensively as a power source, but not in an obvious way.

It doesn't provide enough power to pull combustion air through a commercial power station, but it contributes significantly in reducing the power requirement of the forced- & induced-draught fans. Similarly, natural draught cooling towers (and domestic coal fires for those old enough to remember them) don't need forced ventilation in order to maintain air flow.

 

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31 minutes ago, sethoflagos said:

Natural draught is used extensively as a power source, but not in an obvious way.

It doesn't provide enough power to pull combustion air through a commercial power station, but it contributes significantly in reducing the power requirement of the forced- & induced-draught fans. Similarly, natural draught cooling towers (and domestic coal fires for those old enough to remember them) don't need forced ventilation in order to maintain air flow.

 

There are plenty of houses left with solid fuel fires that rely on the chimney draught principle. I remember my mother used to hold a sheet of newspaper across the fireplace when starting the fire, to help it draw at the bottom. Once the suction was so great the newspaper slipped from her palms and went up the chimney, alight, where it started a chimney fire. That was in Edinburgh in the 1950s, before the Clean Air Act put a stop to such things. 

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20 minutes ago, exchemist said:

There are plenty of houses left with solid fuel fires that rely on the chimney draught principle. I remember my mother used to hold a sheet of newspaper across the fireplace when starting the fire, to help it draw at the bottom. Once the suction was so great the newspaper slipped from her palms and went up the chimney, alight, where it started a chimney fire. That was in Edinburgh in the 1950s, before the Clean Air Act put a stop to such things. 

I clearly remember my grandmother starting the fire like that as the family gathered for christmas dinner. The sudden updraught caught her pet budgie by surprise and... it didn't end well. 

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