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Abecedarian

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About Abecedarian

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  1. Yay, verily, 'tis Satan calling... For it were God, then I would expect all those sounds, in different parts of the world, to sound similar and they don't. Everyone knows, God uses proprietary VSTs... and the Devil has the best tunes.
  2. I would have thought the definition of false dichotomy is enough, without the need for a super computer hypothesis. Or any hypothesis for that matter. A false dichotomy is where you declare an "all or nothing" state of affairs for the unknown, while ignoring all and any possibilities in between. How is declaring: "Either everything we can see, touch and feel is real or nothing is" not a false dichotomy? I didn't chastise him. I merely expressed slight disappointment. I appreciate what he meant but accepting that as an argument means we would have to assume The Matrix is real.
  3. He was in the water, so risked drowning. Would you hesitate to aid someone with a broken leg just because your company said it was outside of your 'zone'? What the hell are we becoming? If today's happy little story is anything to go by, I'm absolutely opposed to it. It's recently become of some concern in the UK, as it's already been proposed. I believe it should be resisted on all levels.
  4. Cloud computing. Is it potentially dangerous? At the risk of sounding somewhat Luddite, why did my alarm bells instantly start ringing when I first heard about The Cloud? Being of the generation who saw the very first home computers arrive, I'm naturally used to the hard solutions, where software resides on discs and later in USB sticks. I remember actually having to get my head around the concept of owning a hard drive. Now we're not just looking at a future where our files can be stored remotely - but soon, we'll be able to boot from a remote source - and have our software titles to
  5. It is a false dichotomy, I'm just slightly disappointed you used science fiction to support your argument. I believe it's a philosophical question as hard to answer as whether God exists. Even if everything we're experiencing is an illusion, it's a pretty substantial one. Until we're presented with enough evidence of inconsistencies that are consistent with a super-computer hypothesis, then wouldn't that question be essentially meaningless?
  6. Where a case of human life rests in the balance. Just how is the loss of a human life good for any company unless you happen to be running a concentration camp or a private mercenary unit? Precisely why certain services should never be privatised. 'Douchebag' isn't a strong enough term. If I were late for work one morning because I'd stopped along the way to save someone's life, I'd expect my boss to understand.
  7. You make it hard for me and now I've run out of ideas. Intransigence must have it's limits for a believer, let alone a sceptic of New Age pseudo-science. I will get back to you with the mind-blowing truth as soon as my pyramid comes back, as it has currently been sent away for repairs.
  8. Why do we need to assume there had to be some, humongous some thing responsible for the existence of the Universe? By holding onto that precept, wouldn't we just be demonstrating our lack of comprehension of the no thing? Listen, buckle up, Jesus, Mohammed, Deli Lama... I've just taken my tablet for the day! Putting aside, for a moment, quantum fluctuations in a zero-point field - how much do you, I or any scientist alive, know about nothing? It's so illogical and so opposed to existence as we can perceive, that 'nothing' is almost inconceivable. I challenge you to sit and imagine n
  9. Please excuse my ignorance, as I know nothing about this subject and enjoy reading the discussions. It's just that I read somewhere that we're travelling through time at a certain rate (equivalent to the speed limit of the Universe - light speed?) and, according to some principle which states you can only move in one direction at once, before a change of direction through one axis is minused from the speed of your trajectory on the other axis, thus, as we travel through space, our velocity(?) through space is deducted from that of our speed(?) through time. Before anyone laughs, please no
  10. I believe that God has been superceded by Heavy Metal. Replaced by Bruce Dickinson, to be precise.
  11. I don't know. What are they saying about each other? Firstly, quantum physicists are scientists; quantum physics being a branch of science. The misconception they're at loggerheads probably comes from the fact sub-atomic particles appear to flout the laws of ordinary physics. All this does is present a challenge (which some would argue scientists love anyway). Quantum mechanics seemed crazy to many traditional physicists on first blush but now the difficulty is more in uniting the two, rather than any outright disagreement between scientists themselves. Einstein might have said "God
  12. I'm happy with the program because they include a sceptic. Unlike so many of the other paranormal shows, where they aren't given quite so much freedom to rain on the premise with well deserved levity. Other than that, it gives out great ideas for fiction. I like it, though this doesn't stop me falling asleep half way through.
  13. It doesn't need a mechanism. These things transcend ordinary mechanical things. Wheels and cogs etc. are just the inventions of man. Primitive contraptions. That's probably because there was a problem with his pyramid. Might not have been properly charged with energy. Or it could have been faulty and the energy could have escaped. Did anyone think to call in a pyramidologist to diagnose the fault? I suppose the humidity comes from the sweat left over from the slaves who built the pyramid. Fortean Times.
  14. Reincarnation is illogical for a wide range of reasons, including those which you've listed in your opening post - and which you've done well to mention. My first thought, when we start discussing cockroaches and beetles, is whether the concept could be an early attempt to describe evolution? Religion, being what it is, it doesn't seem too hard to imagine that such an idea could be converted/ individualised into a spiritual 'penalty system' to encourage morality and good behaviour. Does that make sense?
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