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Orbitally Rearranged Monoatomic Elements


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#1 Molotov

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 10:16 PM

...Also known as ORME, ormus, or m-state elements.

http://www.asc-alchemy.com/hudson.html

Basically this guy has found a way to extract 2400 ounces to the ton of rare metals(mainly from the platinum group) out of regular soil found on his farm in Arizona. He also claims this metal extract exhibits extremely odd properties such as acting as a superconductor at room temperate. Its very good read even though most of it is likely pseudoscience.
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#2 Sayonara

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 10:32 PM

He also claims this metal extract exhibits extremely odd properties such as acting as a superconductor at room temperate.

And yet you never see a rich pseudoscientist.

What a confusing world we live in.
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#3 swansont

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 11:44 PM

And yet you never see a rich pseudoscientist.

What a confusing world we live in.


I like the observation, though it's not quite true. Rich pseudoscientific inventors cashed in by selling their idea to other people, not by selling the device itself.

Just like the guys selling get-rich-quick books.
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#4 Sayonara

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 11:53 PM

By rich I mean rich, not temporarily advantaged by a windfall.
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#5 Tetrahedrite

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 12:45 AM

And yet you never see a rich pseudoscientist.

What a confusing world we live in.

I would most definitely have to disagree!
In Australia, pseudoscience is pushed as fact on the television and radio, with things such as magnetic blankets and pillows (amongst other things) and magic (or energy) water. The gullible masses are buying these in enormous quantities and are believing the rubbish "science" that goes along with it. The people selling these things are almost certainly making a fortune.
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#6 Sayonara

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 10:30 AM

Pseudoscience != marketing.
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#7 Artorius

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 11:29 AM

Authors of pseudoscience seem to be making a good living,plenty which appear on the best sellers list on a regular basis....so it would seem they are plenty of rich pseudo's and the opposite for actual scientists.Im sure one could find examples of famous scientists died penniless.

#8 JaKiri

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 11:36 AM

Again, that's not selling the pseudoscience, that's selling the bunkum behind it.

Damn Hawking.
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#9 Sayonara

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 12:41 PM

Thankfully, the majority of pseudos who publish do it via vanity publishers, so they don't make much profit even if they get volume.
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#10 Guest_Erin_*

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Posted 24 February 2005 - 10:57 PM

Has anyone been trying to replicate this mysterious powder? All the claims this guy has made should be easily (dis)provable.

CAN we break the bonds in the atomic structure of gold in order to reduce it to a non-reactive powder with unique properties (without vaporizing what's left of this doomed little planet?)?
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#11 Sayonara

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 01:44 PM

Why would we want to do that?
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#12 Guest_Erin_*

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 10:07 PM

...because if there is any truth at all to his claims about this substance, its potential is almost limitless:
- antigravity technology
- medical applications
- fuel cell technology

At the very least the smart scientist would start buying stock in gold and platinum before dumb blind consumer curiosity drives the prices up.

You can't mean that not even one of the physicists currently researching "gold films" or the like couldn't tear themselves away for long enough to simply check.

Isn't science in its pure form about curiosity?
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#13 swansont

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 12:09 AM

At the very least the smart scientist would start buying stock in gold and platinum before dumb blind consumer curiosity drives the prices up.


He's been doing this for what, 30 years? Wouldn't that have happened already? I think the smart scientist knows snake-oil when he sees it.
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#14 Sayonara

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 02:07 AM

No, I mean why would we want to turn gold into a non-reactive powder?
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#15 Guest_Erin_*

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 06:18 PM

I mean non-reactive in the sense that it (supposedly) becomes like stone, and no longer exhibits the properties of a metal.
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#16 Guest_Erin_*

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 06:24 PM

...also, I never meant to imply that anyone here was not smart. I just meant that if there was any truth to this (or even if there isn't) rumors of gold as a cure-all would drive up stock prices as every joe-investor jumped on the bandwagon.
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#17 Guest_MM Believer_*

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Posted 4 March 2005 - 08:39 AM

I'm just touching on ORME's at the moment through Laurence Gardner's The Magdaleine Legacy and quite an honestly obsurd thought crossed my mind and I do expect you all to laugh heartily at this:

Those of you who are historically informed may know what I am talking about when it comes to Jesus and the Davidic Lineage (please stay with me here).

Alchemists and more recently the Knights Templars had knowledge on how to create this material and the anti-gravity element of this got me thinking that if there were in fact descendants of Jesus still alive in the world today is there any evidence of anything strange that might be related.

Well the one and only instance I can find of a human who may also have the passed down knowledge of ORME's to the extent of using it for anti-gravity purposes showed people in a very busy street. Telling people to watch because he was going to float about a foot off the ground, which he does with no aid and at different parts of the street.

His name? (This is where you laugh!)

David Blaine.

Outrageous? Possibly, but it's a thought I had a couple of years ago that if anyone on earth at this moment was a descendant from the Davidic Line like Jesus then to me David Blaine was a definite.

Hope you have all stopped aching with laughter by now ;-)

Ade.
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#18 Anarchaus

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Posted 1 April 2005 - 01:44 AM

...Also known as ORME, ormus, or m-state elements.

http://www.asc-alchemy.com/hudson.html

Basically this guy has found a way to extract 2400 ounces to the ton of rare metals(mainly from the platinum group) out of regular soil found on his farm in Arizona. He also claims this metal extract exhibits extremely odd properties such as acting as a superconductor at room temperate. Its very good read even though most of it is likely pseudoscience.


why does it seem that every "new" metal or element that is found, it always corrisponds to our knowledge of atomic phisics and mettalurgical properties.

50 years ago its a new metal that will bend, then return to normal, then its a super light element that is super strong, but then now its toned down to a room temperature superconducter.

The point is, all these "discoveries are always metals and stuff that is JUST beyond out capacities, so its always new and interesting. 50 years ago heat treated aluminum and titanium alloys did not exsist, and a super light high tensile strenght alloy shows up. Now its a room temperature superconducter, which is out of our reach, these people are feeding off of the publics ignorance, or "dangling the carrot in front of the horse"

It is my quasi professional opinion that this is total bunk.
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#19 Anarchaus

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Posted 1 April 2005 - 01:49 AM

And yet you never see a rich pseudoscientist.

What a confusing world we live in.



Absolutly correct, these guys are the science version of the dudes who streak during superbowl games, they want their 15 minutes.
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#20 swansont

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Posted 1 April 2005 - 11:56 AM

Absolutly correct, these guys are the science version of the dudes who streak during superbowl games, they want their 15 minutes.


Some are charlatans, but some are true believers that have deluded themselves.
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