Hal.

Effect of Human Waste on Soil and it's Inhabitants ?

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Let's say for the purpose of this question that there is a person who regularly urinates on the same 100 lbs of plant soil day after day . Would a point be reached where the different types of bacteria present in the soil just can't cope with the chemicals present ?

Edited by hal_2011

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Can I also ask how ph of soil can be measured without using anything other than what can be found around a house ?

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Red Cabbage can be used to make a universal indicator (to detect Alkalinity or Acidity of something), although it is not as accurate as products specifically bought to do so (gardening stores might have such a product). You do this by cooking the red cabbage by boiling it in water and then using this water as the universal indicator (it changes colour depending on the PH).

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To answer your original question, Yes, the nitrogen and phosphates in your urine will eventually cause the area to be toxic hindering growth of microbial organisms. How long depends on many factors such as soil type, the eco-region you are in (makes a difference in the community present), the urine used (some have higher or lower amounts of chemicals), if there is any other toxins in your urine and a few more factors as well.

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I would think the salt in your urine would be the deciding factor in plant growth most microbes as well.

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it is a simple device that i bought very cheap at a DIY store. i dont think it is battery operated , it just simply has two metal prongs which you stick in the ground and a meter which reads the ph.

The two prongs are of different metals. They cause a 'Galvanic' action between them in the presence of moisture in the soil.

The flow of electrons between them causes ionisation which gives the 'Conductivity' of the soil as a pH reading.

 

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You can use beet root juice. It turn red when comes in contact with acid and yellow when base. But, you have to treat the soil first. You have to do a distillation or an evaporation because the juice won't show noticeable change when it is just poured in the soil.

Edited by rktpro
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