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Does anybody have any idea as to why we catch 'cold'(flu) in winters (more commonly) than in summers? Viruses are supposedly non-functioning outside the body right? Are they affected by temperature? Please do help!

We tend to clump together in relatively sealed houses, facilitating transmission, because it's cold; the aerosol from sneezing will linger longer in the still, unventilated environment. The lower humidity in winter may also dry mucal membranes of the respiratory system making access easier for the virus.

Edited by StringJunky
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Does anybody have any idea as to why we catch 'cold'(flu) in winters (more commonly) than in summers? Viruses are supposedly non-functioning outside the body right? Are they affected by temperature? Please do help!

I agree with SJ in that viral infection can proliferate in enclosed environments and close quarters; however, the viruses that cause cold and flu also thrive in cold weather. According to this article, rhinoviruses replicate better in cooler temperatures "around 33 degree Celsius," which is about 4 degrees below normal body temperature. It seems that cooler weather affects the body's immune system and lowers body temperature, of the nose particularly, which creates a internal environment conducive to viral infection and replication.

Edited by DrmDoc
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I agree with SJ in that viral infection can proliferate in enclosed environments and close quarters; however, the viruses that cause cold and flu also thrive in cold weather. According to this article, rhinoviruses replicate better in cooler temperatures "around 33 degree Celsius," which is about 4 degrees below normal body temperature. It seems that cooler weather affects the body's immune system and lowers body temperature, of the nose particularly, which creates a internal environment conducive to viral infection and replication.

That's why we get a snotty nose because the body is trying to up the temperature in that area in anattempt to inhibit viral replication. It seems to me, with rhinoviruses, the best thing to do is breathe warm air to avoid a blocked nose and keep as warm as possible; everything the body is doing is to that end during the illness.

Edited by StringJunky
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Fluctuations in internal body temperatures had no direct impact on the virus itself. Rather, it was the body's indirect immune response to the virus that differed, with a stronger response observed among the warmer lung cells and a weaker response observed among the colder nasal cells.Creative Diagnostics website explains the autoimmunity system-The immune system has very powerful effector mechanisms that can eliminate a wide variety of pathogens.

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