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ginger123

Antibody testing (split)

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Hi everyone!

I'm new here and I don't have any idea if it is the right forum part in which I write my question - so sorry for that.

At the moment I'm working on my master degree and now I'm collecting the literature...

 

So my problem is, I was doing the testing of a vaccine in mice and I detected different antibodies. Especially subtypes of IgG.

Can you tell me first when do IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG2c appear? (I know that this is also dependent from the animal model one uses.) And secondly, what are they function so what does it mean, if there would be for example a lot of IgG2b?

 

Thank you very much for you answers!

 

Greets

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Hi everyone!

I'm new here and I don't have any idea if it is the right forum part in which I write my question - so sorry for that.

At the moment I'm working on my master degree and now I'm collecting the literature...

 

So my problem is, I was doing the testing of a vaccine in mice and I detected different antibodies. Especially subtypes of IgG.

Can you tell me first when do IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG2c appear? (I know that this is also dependent from the animal model one uses.) And secondly, what are they function so what does it mean, if there would be for example a lot of IgG2b?

 

Thank you very much for you answers!

 

Greets

You are best creating your own question, rather than tagged onto another one, it will get better exposure.

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This is not really my primary area of expertise, but what I can tell you is that the different isotypes have different properties. From memory, in antibody engineering IgG3 is normally not used.

Furthermore, IgG1 and 3 typically (but not exclusively) act against protein antigens, 2 more against carbohydrates and 4 is involved in chronic responses. Half-life is similar between 1 and 2 and drops significantly for 3 and 4. Abundance is highest for 1 (~60%) followed by 2, 3 and 4 in that order.

 

1 and 3 require additional effector functions, 2 mostly not (which makes it attractive, I do not recall details for 4. Mind you, this is more from the viewpoint of antibody engineering rather than vaccination, though. Just due to abundance my guess (with emphasis on guess) is that 1 and 2 would contribute the most, covering proteins and carbohydrates as antigens (including the potential to act in concert).

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