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The data are compatible with the Standard Model JP = 0+ quantum numbers for the Higgs boson, whereas all alternative hypotheses studied in this letter, namely some specific JP = 0-; 1+; 1-; 2+ models, are excluded at confidence levels above 97.8%.

 

 

They looked at many different models (with different spins and parities) and worked out what the chances were that the data could fit the predictions of those models - it was very low. BTW the 0 is the spin the plus/minus is the parity - see here

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This exclusion holds independently of the assumptions on the coupling strengths to the Standard Model particles and in the case of the JP = 2+ model, of the relative fractions of gluon-fusion and quark-antiquark production of the spin-2 particle.

 

 

Stating how the experiment avoids one or twp pitfalls

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The data thus provide evidence for the spin-0 nature of the Higgs boson, with positive parity being strongly preferred.

 

The particle that they were testing was highly likely to be spin 0; it is further shown elsewhere that the particle is likely to be the Higgs

 

Just One or two more Steps back on these 3 . If that is O.K. Please.

 

[Like magnification back to ( x 5 to x 20) rather than x 150 ]

 

mike

Edited by Mike Smith Cosmos

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They tested the higgs in three ways (the decay pathways).

 

In each of these they looked at the results with various hypotheses in mind - it is highly unlikely that anything other than 0+ could give the data observed.

 

More data and work is required for the highest levels of certainty - but higgs is highly likely to be spin 0+ as predicted.

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They tested the higgs in three ways (the decay pathways).

 

In each of these they looked at the results with various hypotheses in mind - it is highly unlikely that anything other than 0+ could give the data observed.

 

More data and work is required for the highest levels of certainty - but higgs is highly likely to be spin 0+ as predicted.

 

So are you saying that any particle with some particular spin , interacting with the Higgs mechanism via a higgs boson is not going to change its spin in any way by this interaction, or only if it is of a particular type of spin ?

 

Fermions electrons, protons , neutrons ( half integer spins -1/2 1/2 3/2 ... ) firm ,heavy particles

Bosons Higgs , Photon , Graviton ( whole integer spins 0,1,,2 .........) soft, light , force carrying things

 

So the Higgs mechanism is remaining neutral as regards spin with spin 0 , wheras others of a certain type say on light photons , ( 1)

( so they do not acquire mass)

 

And not neutral with say an electron or a proton , ( with half integer spins say spin 1/2 where the interaction with the Higgs would make them acquire mass to some degree or other

 

.post-33514-0-93982200-1376952701_thumb.jpg

Is this by the Spin interaction . ? Is that right ?

Is therefore the spin the vehicle for acquiring mass ? or am I going off on a tangent ? probably !

 

mike

Edited by Mike Smith Cosmos

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!

Moderator Note

16 posts have been split off into their own thread HERE due to the speculative nature of this tangent.

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So are you saying that any particle with some particular spin , interacting with the Higgs mechanism via a higgs boson is not going to change its spin in any way by this interaction, or only if it is of a particular type of spin ?

 

Fermions electrons, protons , neutrons ( half integer spins -1/2 1/2 3/2 ... ) firm ,heavy particles

Bosons Higgs , Photon , Graviton ( whole integer spins 0,1,,2 .........) soft, light , force carrying things

 

So the Higgs mechanism is remaining neutral as regards spin with spin 0 , wheras others of a certain type say on light photons , ( 1)

( so they do not acquire mass)

 

And not neutral with say an electron or a proton , ( with half integer spins say spin 1/2 where the interaction with the Higgs would make them acquire mass to some degree or other

 

.attachicon.gifHiggs 1.jpg

Is this by the Spin interaction . ? Is that right ?

Is therefore the spin the vehicle for acquiring mass ? or am I going off on a tangent ? probably !

 

mike

.

 

. Has there been any development, as to whether the Higgs boson

in some way transmits the SPIN QUALITY to particles ( like all particles) that it interacts with

to give the particles MASS ?

 

 

http://www.scienceforums.net/uploads/monthly_08_2013/post-33514-0-93982200-1376952701.jpg

 

.

Edited by Mike Smith Cosmos

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