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what is your favourite book in engineering sciences?


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  • 1 month later...
On 11/2/2020 at 6:44 AM, KyleLeClair said:

When I was doing my formal training in the military, I supplemented classwork that was very watered down with Practical Electronics for Inventors. It opened up my eyes to the amazing world of EE.

it smells lovely to me, could you provide more infor about this book to us?

which publication?

author?

publication year?

thanks.

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Physics - Principles and Application, Douglas C. Giancoli, ISBN0-13-060620-0.  The interesting thing about this book is that it covers the physics behind virtually all branches of Engineering.  It is a College level textbook that has the unique feature that is it Algebra based instead of being Calculus based.  As a result the examples and problem sets are somewhat more closely aligned with the day-to-day of engineering problems as opposed to more research oriented aspects of physics.

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Well I'm sorry I don't have a single favourite book.
Also some engineering books go out of date rather quickly these days.

So here is a dozen of my most thumbed.

Joel    :            Basic Engineering Thermodynamics.

Kreysig  :       Advanced Engineering mathematics

Dake     :         Introduction to Engineering hydraulics

Douglas :      Solutions to Problems in Fluid Mechanics, vols I and II

Shepherd  :  Advanced Engineering Surveying

Rees     :         Mechanics of Solids and Structures

Singer   :       Strength of Materials

Lambe   :      Soil Mechanics

Halsey   :       A Reference Book for Electrical and Telecommunications Engineers

Clayton  :      Linear Integrated Circuits

Hall          :      Microprocessors and Digital Systems

Downey & Rogers   :  PET Interfacing

 

Edited by studiot
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On 12/21/2020 at 1:52 PM, ahmet said:

it smells lovely to me, could you provide more infor about this book to us?

which publication?

author?

publication year?

thanks.

Absolutely, it's the 4th edition authored by Simon Monk and Paul Scherz. McGraw Hill is the publisher. The edition I have now was published in 2016, but I was using the 3rd during school. the text is currently $32.00 on Amazon, quite a steal in my opinion. 

 

IMG_4640.thumb.jpg.649dcaa488f16a6745a8ea141ac19187.jpg

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On 12/23/2020 at 12:37 AM, studiot said:

Well I'm sorry I don't have a single favourite book.
 

ahahahaha ha aha :) :) :) :)  ,congrats for your effort with such studies.

but,

 

On 12/23/2020 at 12:37 AM, studiot said:

Also some engineering books go out of date rather quickly these days.

I do not think so. it all depends on your perspective to me. 

Edited by ahmet
smileys added :) :)
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20 minutes ago, ahmet said:

I do not think so. it all depends on your perspective to me. 

Thanks for the reply, but why do you say this ?

Here are the front and back covers of a book from 1957.

The front cover is about totally obsolete transistor circuitry.

The back cover is an advert for an different book in the series about electrical powerline faults, powerline stuuf is still in date.

engbook1.jpg.ee9dc0429e6871751313cc6e62c9e9c7.jpg

 

Another really good example would be "Design of Reinforced Concrete to CP114"

CP 114 was the design standard from the late 1940s to the late 1960s when it was replaced by CP110.

There is a word of differerence between these standards.

CP110 brought in "Limit State Analysis"

Are you aware of Limit State Analysis in engineering design  ?

It is of vital importance in the modern world.

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On 12/30/2020 at 6:05 PM, studiot said:

Thanks for the reply, but why do you say this ?

Here are the front and back covers of a book from 1957.

well, I say that ,because perspective is really effective. to me, if you have that you can achieve very bright things. 

but eventually we shall be able to say that these are different issues.

--->> perspective

--->> working hard. 

one of them conains talent while another does not have to.

,and a response to your another implication: I am almost sure that we would be able to create something new via rather general (even basic) theorems.

for instance, bernhard bolzano had lived between 1781-1848. but that does not mean that his thorems would not cause new results in the far future (e.g. 2200) :) 

I do not really believe that any book's importance/value/prominence would be measurable via its cover page (i.e. appearance) 

nnnnever ! :) :) 

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46 minutes ago, ahmet said:

for instance, bernhard bolzano had lived between 1781-1848

Mmm  disappointing response to my question  -- you might have learned something.

I wasn't aware that Bolzano wrote any engineering textbook - This thread is supposedly about engineering texts.

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9 minutes ago, studiot said:

Mmm  disappointing response to my question  -- you might have learned something.

I wasn't aware that Bolzano wrote any engineering textbook - This thread is supposedly about engineering texts.

of course.but you can create something from theoretic parts. I mean that you could create your own application.

anyway, yes. this thread is about engineering texts. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 10/25/2020 at 4:02 PM, ahmet said:

would you like to share your opinions in convenience of title?

let us learn which engineering book you mostly enjoyed,pleased to read and why.

Engineering Databook SI Version (aka GPSA Databook), Gas Processors Suppliers Association, 11th Edition 1998 has probably helped resolve more day-to-day issues for me over recent years than any other.

But most enjoyable .... probably  Pump Handbook, Kurassik & al, 3rd Edition 2001. Comprehensive, very readable, more Aha! moments per chapter than you can shake a stick at.

Honourable mention to 'Understanding Atmospheric Dispersion of Accidental Releases', Devaull et al.,AIChE 1995 just for the unfortunate title really.  

 

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