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CuriosOne

Is Causual and Random the same thing?

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Causal: Cause and Effect Questions Designed to determine whether one or more variables causes or affects one or more outcome variables. 

 

A random variable is a mathematical function that ""maps""outcomes of random experiments to numbers. It can be thought of as the numeric result of operating a non-deterministic mechanism or performing a non-deterministic experiment to generate a random result.

Edited by CuriosOne

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No, it's not the same thing.

"Random" is the opposite of "determined."

"Causal" means "happening as the result of something."

You can have random variables that show no causal connection between them.

You can have random variables that show causal connection between them.

You can have deterministic variables that show no causal connection between them.

You can have deterministic variables that show causal connection between them.

;)

And then you have "casual," which is the way most scientists dress when they're working.

And then you have cassowaries, which are not casual at all, and seem to dress up all the time.

;)

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I'm glad you have done the right thing and started a new thread instead of pursuing off topic additional thoughts in one of your many existing ones.  +1 for encouragement.

It is actually very difficult to come up with a satisfactory definition of 'random' , deterministic , causal

I don't know if the question in your OP is in your own words or if you have quoted some source you haven't acknowledged.
Anyway I have a couple of comments.

Firstly casual (the word in the OP title question) and causal are different words with different meanings.

Secondly the statement

5 hours ago, CuriosOne said:

A random variable is a mathematical function that ""maps""outcomes of random experiments to numbers. It can be thought of as the numeric result of operating a non-deterministic mechanism or performing a non-deterministic experiment to generate a random result.

 

fails to properly distinguish between variables and a single result or outcome.

Doing this is important.

Now 'random'  is an adjective that is meaningless by itself. Your quote applies it to three different nouns (all important in statistical theory) to create mathematically specific instances of the nouns

variable, experiment and result. It should also equate outcome with result.

Also hidden in the above quote is the distinction between singular and plural.

Which introduces another very important concept - probability.

Strangely enough you need the idea of limits we started to explore in you unfinished calculus thread. You do not need the whole apparatus of calculus however.

Otherwise we are stuck with imprecise statements such as ' a very large number of.....'  , without having any idea how large is large enough.

 

OK so he is a definition of 'random' due to Kolmogorov.

A result is random is it cannot be obtained by any process that is shorter than the statement of the result itself.

so '5' , by itself, is a random number since it is shorter than say (3+2)

If you wish to follow this through and understand what how this all fits together you will have to stay focused.
 

 

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15 hours ago, joigus said:

No, it's not the same thing.

"Random" is the opposite of "determined."

"Causal" means "happening as the result of something."

You can have random variables that show no causal connection between them.

You can have random variables that show causal connection between them.

You can have deterministic variables that show no causal connection between them.

You can have deterministic variables that show causal connection between them.

;)

And then you have "casual," which is the way most scientists dress when they're working.

And then you have cassowaries, which are not casual at all, and seem to dress up all the time.

;)

I think i understand the random numbers part and if they had meaning or "measurable quantities that can be tested phyiscally"  by some "say"scientific claim, they would be casual?

Why do I keep thinking about intrinsic..

15 hours ago, studiot said:

I'm glad you have done the right thing and started a new thread instead of pursuing off topic additional thoughts in one of your many existing ones.  +1 for encouragement.

It is actually very difficult to come up with a satisfactory definition of 'random' , deterministic , causal

I don't know if the question in your OP is in your own words or if you have quoted some source you haven't acknowledged.
Anyway I have a couple of comments.

Firstly casual (the word in the OP title question) and causal are different words with different meanings.

Secondly the statement

 

fails to properly distinguish between variables and a single result or outcome.

Doing this is important.

Now 'random'  is an adjective that is meaningless by itself. Your quote applies it to three different nouns (all important in statistical theory) to create mathematically specific instances of the nouns

variable, experiment and result. It should also equate outcome with result.

Also hidden in the above quote is the distinction between singular and plural.

Which introduces another very important concept - probability.

Strangely enough you need the idea of limits we started to explore in you unfinished calculus thread. You do not need the whole apparatus of calculus however.

Otherwise we are stuck with imprecise statements such as ' a very large number of.....'  , without having any idea how large is large enough.

 

OK so he is a definition of 'random' due to Kolmogorov.

A result is random is it cannot be obtained by any process that is shorter than the statement of the result itself.

so '5' , by itself, is a random number since it is shorter than say (3+2)

If you wish to follow this through and understand what how this all fits together you will have to stay focused.
 

 

Totally forgot where I copied and pasted from..Will give credits next time.

I think the 5 example is pretty clear to me, but casual and random do seem very invloved topics, but I'm glad I encountered them..Random comes up a lot...

 

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