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MaximT

verifying relativity

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What will be the step to verify relativity in constant acceleration between earth and proxima centory ?

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2 hours ago, MaximT said:

What will be the step to verify relativity in constant acceleration between earth and proxima centory ?

What is the advantage of attempting to do that?

One of the postulates of relativity (and physics in general, since at least Galileo) is that physics is independent of place and time. 

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What will be the time on the ship clock, if Einstein was wrong, and if He was right, depending on a trip at constant acceleration to or from those two planets? The advantage is to discuss about the theory...

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1 minute ago, MaximT said:

What will be the time on the ship clock, if Einstein was wrong, and if He was right, depending on a trip at constant acceleration to or from those two planets? 

You need to quantify this. What speeds, time, distance are you considering?

Better still, learn the simple mathematics of SR so you can work this out for yourself.

(And this has nothing to do with Einstein been right or wrong. The theory has been thoroughly tested and is correct.)

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First off the Lorentz transforms are under constant velocity not acceleration though one can use instantaneous velocity at each coordinate to adjust for constant acceleration.

Secondly redshift from distant stars comply with relativistic effects.

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2 minutes ago, Mordred said:

First off the Lorentz transforms are under constant velocity not acceleration though one can use instantaneous velocity at each coordinate to adjust for constant acceleration.

In fact, we need proper time, so proper acceleration, because, otherwise, it will be too complexe for me, in time, to discuss that with you, based on Einstein Theory.

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Proper time follows the worldline of the light signal. It is the reference clock along the worldline path.

Both the emitter and observer is at coordinate time.

Edited by Mordred

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4 minutes ago, Mordred said:

Both the emitter and observer is at coordinate time.

I don't understand correctly, do you mean that there is no time dilation at speed close to light speed?

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No there is two time descriptives involved in relativity proper time and coordinate time. One must apply each correctly.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proper_time

In essence redshift applies in this case as we're dealing with signals along the light path.

Edited by Mordred

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I agree Einstein theory must be apply correctly, if we want to compare it, and verify it... 

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8 minutes ago, MaximT said:

I agree Einstein theory must be apply correctly, if we want to compare it, and verify it... 

Go on then. The math is very simple. Post your calculations here and we can check it for you.

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Keep in mind everytime we measure stellar objects and have to account for redshift we are testing relativity. Every time we accelerate a proton at an LHC we test relativity. In essence it's being tested 1000's of times everyday.

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6 minutes ago, Strange said:

The math is very simple.

Not at all, but I will try to do some calculation for you, in the next hours...

Edited by MaximT

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The Lorentz transforms of SR are easy enough to do at home

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It's been verified hundreds of times with GPS satellites as one example. Relativity is extremely well tested.

Lol they even measured the time dilation between a persons foot to his head.

Edited by Mordred

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5 minutes ago, Mordred said:

Lol they even measured the time dilation between a persons foot to his head.

I don't want to make you upset, but my personal opinion is that gravitational lines are not conservative in energy, that's why!  This clock will do the trick...

 

image.thumb.png.a4012e095bdfb72e3482dbf68d9fb770.png

Edited by MaximT

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2 minutes ago, MaximT said:

I don't want to make you upset, but my personal opinion is that gravitational lines are not conservative in energy, that's why!

An opinion doesn't have much value.

If you are not even willing/able to do the schoolboy math of special relativity, I don't think your "opinions" on gravity and energy conservation have much basis.

And what is a "gravitational line"?

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1 minute ago, Strange said:

If you are not even willing/able to do the schoolboy math of special relativity

Waste of time, unless you could dilated it to fraction of second.

 

1 minute ago, Strange said:

I don't think your "opinions" on gravity and energy conservation have much basis.

Up to you, the future will teach us the truth...

 

2 minutes ago, Strange said:

And what is a "gravitational line"?

Much density close to the center of mass, and less over distance!

 

 

Now you could close this subject if you want, but It's a big win to me, in a relativistic point of view :)

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As a professional physicist I can certainly tell you conservation laws are obeyed in relativity. Though you must apply both the invariant and variant mass.

 The entire field of particle physics revolves around this principle.

Let's put that to perspective CERN fires protons to cause collisions yet the particles they decay into has more mass than the invariant rest mass of both particles. Those particles gain relativistic or variant mass due to their acceleration.

All particle decays comply with the conservation of energy momentum under GR. 

3 minutes ago, MaximT said:

Waste of time, unless you could dilated it to fraction of second.

 

Up to you, the future will teach us the truth...

 

Much density close to the center of mass, and less over distance!

 

 

Now you could close this subject if you want, but It's a big win to me, in a relativistic point of view :)

I don't see how all you posted was your gut feelings with zero evidence. Nothing that changes anyone elses view point.

However you can believe whatever you choose. Belief won't change scientific evidence.

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6 minutes ago, Mordred said:

CERN fires protons to cause collisions yet the particles they decay

You could try some of my experiments, why yours are better? If once done they gives rise to evidence… from a hobbys Physicist :) 

Edited by MaximT

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Have you even tried any of your claimed experiments ? 

I have mentioned actual tested and applied experiments that have already been used to test relativity not imagined and never applied experiments.

Edited by Mordred

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No, but I swear that I saw the results personally, If you know what I mean!

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I'm suppose to take your word you saw a test of proper acceleration between Earth and Alpha Centauri ?

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I have to leave, see you next time, in a year, maybe 🥰.  Yes...

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