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Joe98

Inheritance of paternal mitochondrial DNA

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Am pretty sure that you have read all the fuzz about fathers passing on mitochondrial DNA. I have read a paper saying that Mitochondrial DNA can be translocated to the nucleus, several diseases can be caused by this phenomenon like  pallistor hall syndrome is it possible that the  two events are closely associated 

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4 hours ago, Joe98 said:

Am pretty sure that you have read all the fuzz about fathers passing on mitochondrial DNA

No. Can you provide a reference?

4 hours ago, Joe98 said:

I have read a paper saying that Mitochondrial DNA can be translocated to the nucleus

You need to say which paper, otherwise there is not much anyone can say about it.

 

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I am a bit confused about your question. Is it whether  Pallistor Hall syndrome can cause by mtDNA migration? If so yes, the assumption is that fragment insertions cause mutation and thereby genetic dysfunctions.

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1 hour ago, CharonY said:

I am a bit confused about your question. Is it whether  Pallistor Hall syndrome can cause by mtDNA migration? If so yes, the assumption is that fragment insertions cause mutation and thereby genetic dysfunctions.

Sorry my question wording was weird, what I meant to ask is ,do pallistor hall syndrome  contribute to paternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA, since they’re caused by the MTDNA migration to the nucleus 

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So there are two distinct and rare events that are not directly linked. The first is paternal inheritance. As you know, mtDNA is generally inherited from the maternal line. However, there are events in which they can be acquired from the father. This is a different event from subsequent transfer of mtDNA into the nucleus. Pallister-Hall, in itself is again a different a separate issue. The syndrome is caused by regulatory mutations. These could be caused by insertion of mtDNA, but other mutations are also possible (and perhaps more likely). I.e. it does not require mtDNA translocation. There has (to my knowledge) one case study in mtDNA transfer was found to be responsible for a case of Pallister-Hall. That, however, also coincided with the Chernobyl disaster.

In either case, due to the rarity of paternal mtDNA inheritance, the vast majority of nuclear transfers are of maternal mtDNA. Together with the fact that the P-H Syndrome is in fact a symptom of such an event the answer is no, P-H does not contribute to paternal mtDNA transfer nor is it itself indicative of such events.

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1 hour ago, CharonY said:

As you know, mtDNA is generally inherited from the maternal line. However, there are events in which they can be acquired from the father.

I was going to ask how this can happen, then found this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paternal_mtDNA_transmission

Sounds like it is still somewhat controversial - whether it happens at all or if it is significant.

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1 hour ago, Strange said:

Sounds like it is still somewhat controversial - whether it happens at all or if it is significant.

In humans there is quite a discussion whether it is actually happening. Connected to this, it is actually still not entirely clear how paternal mitochondria are eliminated, either. One hypothesis stated that paternal mtDNA could be outdiluted and be found in low amount in tissue as lekage. However, a deep-sequencing study has not found any suggested signatures. Recent work on Drosophila has strengthened the hypothesis that paternal mitochondria are actually actively eliminated. In that case potential leakage would be expected to be an even rarer event.

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32 minutes ago, CharonY said:

Recent work on Drosophila has strengthened the hypothesis that paternal mitochondria are actually actively eliminated.

If such a mechanism has evolved, does it imply that there is something intrinsically wrong or bad about inheriting mitochondria from the father?

Could it be that they are only intended to power the sperm and not really adequate (in some way) to be reproduced and used more widely? 

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1 hour ago, Strange said:

If such a mechanism has evolved, does it imply that there is something intrinsically wrong or bad about inheriting mitochondria from the father?

Could it be that they are only intended to power the sperm and not really adequate (in some way) to be reproduced and used more widely? 

It is not that simple. The short answer is that it is not known. One hypothesis is that by avoiding having different organelle genomes could lead e.g. to incompatibilities in the mitochondrial functions (note there has been hypothesized that paternal mtDNA may be subject to more oxidative damage, but to my knowledge there was never any experimental evidence to substantiate that). There is some molecular evidence for that in e.g. Caenorhabditis, but it is not considered a resolved question yet.

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