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bahozkaleez

electronic currents in different bonds

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I have a test soon, and I was reading up on the different types of bonding. But, there are somethings that I don't get with the electronic current.

 

Firstly when an ionic compound is a liquid or aqueous, then you can place electrodes and the ions of different charges would move to the electrodes of the opposite charges. I get all of that. But, then how would the current pass through the water if the positive charged electrons are attracted to the negative electrodes.

 

Also, I am a bit confused about metallic bonding and graphite/graphene. If there is a sea of delocalised electrons, then won't the electrons in the current get repelled by the electrons in the metal?

 

Thank you.

 

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I have a test soon, and I was reading up on the different types of bonding. But, there are somethings that I don't get with the electronic current.

 

Firstly when an ionic compound is a liquid or aqueous, then you can place electrodes and the ions of different charges would move to the electrodes of the opposite charges. I get all of that. But, then how would the current pass through the water if the positive charged electrons are attracted to the negative electrodes.

 

Also, I am a bit confused about metallic bonding and graphite/graphene. If there is a sea of delocalised electrons, then won't the electrons in the current get repelled by the electrons in the metal?

 

Thank you.

 

 

 

A test soon?

 

You need to sort out some basic concepts before you tackle more difficult things like bonding in graphite and graphene, diamond and other forms of carbon.

 

First and foremost electrons have a negative charge not a positive one.

 

So a mini test to help

 

do you know what these are

 

Atom

 

Molecule

 

Ion

 

Electron

 

Proton

 

Neutron

 

 

Whether you have an ionic system (almost always liquid or gas) you have no current until you impress (apply) a voltage.

 

The same is true of a metallic system.

 

Do you know what an ionic (ionised) gas is called ?

 

This will give you a start in the right direction.

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The process by which an electric current passes through an ionic compound, followed by the decomposition of the compound, is known as electrolysis.

Any substance that undergoes electrolysis is known as electrolyte. A substance that doesn't undergo electrolysis ( i.e. the substance does not allow current to pass through it or doesn't get decomposed ) is known as a non-electrolyte. Most ionic compounds are electrolytes, whereas covalent compounds are mostly non-electrolytes.

A good way to understand the process of electrolysis is to understand how an ionic compound dissociates into ions.

Take, for instance, the electrolysis of sodium chloride (NaCl). When a current is passed through the NaCl solution, the charged ions migrate towards the oppositely charged electrodes ( cations move towards cathode and anions move towards anode). By this way, a current flows through the solution. But, there is a wide difference between the flow of current in a conductor and in an electrolyte.

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A test soon?

 

You need to sort out some basic concepts before you tackle more difficult things like bonding in graphite and graphene, diamond and other forms of carbon.

 

First and foremost electrons have a negative charge not a positive one.

 

So a mini test to help

 

do you know what these are

 

Atom

 

Molecule

 

Ion

 

Electron

 

Proton

 

Neutron

 

 

Whether you have an ionic system (almost always liquid or gas) you have no current until you impress (apply) a voltage.

 

The same is true of a metallic system.

 

Do you know what an ionic (ionised) gas is called ?

 

This will give you a start in the right direction.

 

I already know all of this. I figured it out anyway, I was misinterpreting what the book was saying.

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I already know all of this. I figured it out anyway, I was misinterpreting what the book was saying.

 

Are you clear now ??

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