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Mellinia

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About Mellinia

  • Rank
    Atom
  • Birthday 03/29/1995

Profile Information

  • Interests
    Um, thinking? lol
  • Favorite Area of Science
    Psychology, Computer Science, Chemistry
  • Biography
    Eat. Drink. Savour the Chaos.

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  1. if a computer offers access through something like sshd, or a network directory through LAN, it is possible to use a program, that you call using the terminal to access the other computer. One thing I use a lot from my terminal is `ssh`, which allows me to access my remote server so I can host my websites on them.
  2. I think you should elaborate by telling us why do you think it shouldnt be called a OOP language.
  3. TLDR : Mining with commerical cards are much more profitable than using specialized hardware due to electrical fees.
  4. First posted in biology, but I dont know how to cross-post, so I will copy paste it here too. I came across this perspective when I realize using the CRISPR gene editing technology in the context of synthetic biology is basically doing code/DLL injection. In another way of seeing it, it is akin to installing chrome extensions (though this isn't really accurate because chrome extensions requires explicit permission, but this will be an easier example to use than a computer virus) to add or modify functionality of chrome. Chrome extensions are able to modify and monitor everything yo
  5. I came across this perspective when I realize using the CRISPR gene editing technology in the context of synthetic biology is basically doing code/DLL injection. In another way of seeing it, it is akin to installing chrome extensions (though this isn't really accurate because chrome extensions requires explicit permission, but this will be an easier example to use than a computer virus) to add or modify functionality of chrome. Chrome extensions are able to modify and monitor everything you do in the browser, and with what genes we have designed and inserted into the genetic host, we can do so
  6. I can go mad watching people masquerade as Python experts when all they had was VB.NET

  7. Actually, going from Java to C++ will not be difficult language features wise, but you might miss the libraries available for Java. While C++ does have some quirks (String^ and std::cout anyone?), it is an OO language in the sense that it allows classes to be use. Unlike Python or Ruby though, everything is not an object in C++. About C++ being hard, you've already learnt Java threads and stuff, right? So you'll get along just fine. Though you may need to wrap your head around how pointers and memory management work (I believe C++ now has GC), and understand what are abstractions in Java,
  8. Well, you could try looking into some computer science papers for a start. AFAIK, most papers (even Python ones!) assume a good foundation in maths to understand the algorithms. The point is, computer science, looking into algorithms, understanding pointers, abstractions, (if your CS programme doesn't have it...good luck.) is a little mind-bending, if you never programmed before, but having a foundation of logic (by maths) helps out a lot. Low job prospects probably refer to the fact that since CS is not really easy, most just maybe wander around the so-so part when companies want competent p
  9. If you want to learn on how to write programs, I would suggest Python, since with Garbage Collection, terse and readable code, a nice set of libraries, it will ease a lot of the beginner's mind on how to write the program, instead of wrangling with how to make my program work. As you progress along python, you will slowly meet obstacles that would require an in-depth understanding of how memory work, etc. This is done gradually after you have developed a consistent model of how to write a program (this is the most important thing of all) since python is beginner friendly and consistent.
  10. Inertia could be seen as more of a fictional property. The object would continue at it's current velocity if there were no net force on the object. It is not an inherent property. Gravity is not an property of matter. Where did you get that idea? In a vacuum very far from any other masses(You can choose many massive objects to show this), the massive object will experience no effects of gravity. Does the matter still exist as matter? Yes. It does not need gravity to prove it is matter.
  11. Thus are you saying that the intrisic charge is related to it's mass? FOR e^2 =4 /PI /EPSILON G M^2, should I take M as eletron mass?
  12. As in E=mc^2 infinite? M is included in your theory as the total mass in the system?
  13. Accelerated electrons emit photons as a consequence of the light speed limit, and mass particles may do the same, but this is a recoil force, describing the energy loss as a consequence of it's own EM field, and not the whole energy of the electron system, so while "self-force" is right (recoil, much?), self-energy...a bit suspicious? Anyhow, e^2 = 4 /pi /epsilon_0 GM^2, what is M? This could be an arbitrary mass? Though I did do some calcs and if e is the elementary charge, and other constants are what they are from the CODATA website, M should be around 1.857e-9 kg....?
  14. Taking a spherical cow...lol jking If I were to simplify this into a point mass, the point mass would exert an gravitational force on anything that enters it's field, but the force won't be exerted on itself, right? Drawing an analogy to EM, would a +ve charge be affected by it's own electric field? How does this cause "self-energy"?
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