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Schrodingers Cat could be visible after all


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#1 Semjase

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Posted 5 March 2013 - 01:40 AM

Could this be the breakthrough that wins a Nobel prize and

allows us to peek ahead at the future.

 

http://www.tgdaily.c...sible-after-all

 

http://news.national...antum-computer/


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#2 elfmotat

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Posted 5 March 2013 - 01:49 AM

This looks like journalistic sensationalism to me. I fail to see where the uncertainty principle is violated.


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\mathcal{Z}=\int \mathcal{D} \varphi \, e^{i \mathcal{S}}


#3 Semjase

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Posted 5 March 2013 - 02:13 AM

I think what their talking about is that you can on the first measurement determine the polarization of a photon,

yet it still remains in the indeterminate state and that state is then determined by the second measurement.


Edited by Semjase, 5 March 2013 - 07:05 AM.

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#4 swansont

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Posted 5 March 2013 - 10:50 AM

The first measurement does not determine the polarization state of the photon.  

 

"Repeating the process several times allows accurate statistics to be built up, giving a full, direct characterization of the polarization states of the light."

 

Having to repeat to get enough statistics means one measurement has a larger uncertainty.


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#5 Semjase

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Posted 7 March 2013 - 11:32 PM

Based on this quote concerning this experiment would you be

able with this system, to statically predict the future?

 


"The key to characterizing any quantum system is gathering
information about conjugate variables," said co-author Jonathan Leach,
who is now a lecturer at Heriot-Watt University, UK. "The reason it
wasn't thought possible to measure two conjugate variables directly was
because measuring one would destroy the wavefunction before the other
one could be measured."


The direct measurement technique employs a "trick" to measure the
first property in such a way that the system is not disturbed
significantly and information about the second property can still be
obtained. This careful measurement relies on the "weak measurement" of
the first property followed by a "strong measurement" of the second
property.


First described 25 years ago, weak measurement requires that the
coupling between the system and what is used to measure it be, as its
name suggests, "weak", which means that the system is barely disturbed
in the measurement process. The downside of this type of measurement is
that a single measurement only provides a small amount of information,
and to get an accurate readout, the process has to be repeated multiple
times and the average taken.

 

Read more:http://www.rochester...how.php?id=5692


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#6 Alyaarn

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:15 AM

Well, to my knowledge, the 2012 Noble Prize for Physics was shared by two physicists who used

quantum entanglements to beat the "uncertainty" state of particles. That entire law that revolves

around observation of a quantum state (uncertainty) resulting in certainty via probability. Well, 

these guys were able to find a loophole around this principle. However, I do not know how

something this extraordinary could be done.

 

Refernces:

 

http://www.nobelpriz...csprize2012.pdf


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#7 imatfaal

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 10:05 AM

Well, to my knowledge, the 2012 Noble Prize for Physics was shared by two physicists who used

quantum entanglements to beat the "uncertainty" state of particles. That entire law that revolves

around observation of a quantum state (uncertainty) resulting in certainty via probability. Well, 

these guys were able to find a loophole around this principle. However, I do not know how

something this extraordinary could be done.

 

Refernces:

 

http://www.nobelpriz...csprize2012.pdf

 

From my reading they won the prize for developing two techniques that (amongst other things) allows the investigation of the cross-over from the very small to the macroscopic (the essence of schroedingers cat) and superposition of states in the normally non-quantum experience.  They did not according to memory or your quoted document threaten uncertainty principle; although many other pieces of work recently have been hyped by the press as doing this.  to my knowledge the HUP is alive, well, and still unbreachable.


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#8 swansont

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 10:08 AM

Well, to my knowledge, the 2012 Noble Prize for Physics was shared by two physicists who used

quantum entanglements to beat the "uncertainty" state of particles. That entire law that revolves

around observation of a quantum state (uncertainty) resulting in certainty via probability. Well, 

these guys were able to find a loophole around this principle. However, I do not know how

something this extraordinary could be done.

 

Refernces:

 

http://www.nobelpriz...csprize2012.pdf

 

No, they did not find a loophole. Neither Heisenberg nor uncertainty appears in that link.  


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