Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Genetic Engineering....what major?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 teutonic7777

teutonic7777

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 16 September 2011 - 03:13 AM

Hello, I am a new poster. Like several other posts I have seen on here, I am a current social science major that is in the process of switching to a "hard" science. Unfortunately, I am a senior and just figured out what my passion is. I am new to the sciences so please forgive me for not knowing the exact specifics of what I want to study. I do know what I am interested in and want to study. That leads me to my question.

I am interested in genetic engineering. I would like to learn about manipulating DNA and engineering existing DNA. Cloning is also interesting. What degree would best suit me to pursue? I have read a lot online but get general answers. I have narrowed it down to molecular biology, biochemistry, biomedical engineering, or just a straight PH.D in genetics. I want to pursue a doctorate in one of those fields. Would a genetics degree teach me the most about genetic engineering? Would the other three majors teach me genetic engineering techniques? Thanks for the input.

Edited by teutonic7777, 16 September 2011 - 03:45 AM.

  • 0

#2 ajb

ajb

    Physics Expert

  • Resident Experts
  • 6,864 posts
  • LocationWarsaw, Poland

Posted 16 September 2011 - 09:15 AM

You have got the right subject areas to move into genetic engineering. As for exactly what degree, you should ask the universities you are interested in directly. They will give you more specifics.
  • 0
"In physics you don't have to go around making trouble for yourself - nature does it for you" Frank Wilczek.


Mathematical Ramblings.

#3 teutonic7777

teutonic7777

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 18 September 2011 - 07:32 PM

Thanks for the reply. I see what you mean about checking with the individual schools and programs. A lot of it depends on the actual professor and what their research interest is in. Thanks.
  • 0

#4 CharonY

CharonY

    Biology Expert

  • Resident Experts
  • 5,125 posts
  • Locationsomewhere in the Americas.

Posted 19 September 2011 - 11:26 PM

Also genetic engineering is a rather broad, or narrow area, depending on how you define it. In many cases it refers to a given set of molecular techniques that are used in a given context. Usually the discipline is defined via this context.
  • 0

#5 teutonic7777

teutonic7777

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 20 September 2011 - 08:22 PM

Again, thanks for the replies. I want to eventually and ultimately get into anti aging research. After doing a bit more research, I think a molecular biology or straight genetics degree would probably suit my interests best. It figures I just now found my passion after all but one semester remaining in my sociology degree which I now find quite boring and some of it even borderline pseudoscience (not to offend any sociologists). Some of it is interesting, applicable to real life, and empirical, but a lot of the sociological studies are nothing more than someone conducting a biased observation to fit their ideology and then calling it fact or research. Some things just can't be accurately measured. This is why I like the natural sciences. It is more concrete.

Edited by teutonic7777, 20 September 2011 - 08:23 PM.

  • 0

#6 Maryjane

Maryjane

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 7 October 2011 - 06:53 AM

Hello, I am a new poster. Like several other posts I have seen on here, I am a current social science major that is in the process of switching to a "hard" science. Unfortunately, I am a senior and just figured out what my passion is. I am new to the sciences so please forgive me for not knowing the exact specifics of what I want to study. I do know what I am interested in and want to study. That leads me to my question.

I am interested in genetic engineering. I would like to learn about manipulating DNA and engineering existing DNA. Cloning is also interesting. What degree would best suit me to pursue? I have read a lot online but get general answers. I have narrowed it down to molecular biology, biochemistry, biomedical engineering, or just a straight PH.D in genetics. I want to pursue a doctorate in one of those fields. Would a genetics degree teach me the most about genetic engineering? Would the other three majors teach me genetic engineering techniques? Thanks for the input.



It's a great career. Doing genetic engineering can lead you to be a researcher or working on other applied aspects like disease cures or agricultural production. In college you can have a major in biology with an emphasis on molecular and cellular biology. Other majors are biochemistry or molecular biology. You need to have an intense basic biology and then move into a concentrated set of courses in molecular biology. You can get it in almost all major public and private universities but prefer the one which has better lab setup and which gives you better hands on research experience.
  • 0

#7 Psycho

Psycho

    Atom

  • Senior Members
  • 516 posts
  • LocationEngland

Posted 7 October 2011 - 08:48 PM

I don't really understand the whole american system, so don't really know what a senior is (I thought it was to do with highschool) but from the sounds of it you are in the final year of a sociology degree, you won't be able to go straight into a PHD from that basis, as to be honest you won't have a clue what you are doing, what would be the best option if you can get a place to do a Masters in Molecular Biology, Genetics or something similar and this will though not be specific for your interests of ageing will teach you about cancer, genetic diseases, how they occur and the many fundamental pathways that are important, as well as how way they go wrong (hence ageing).

I am currently studying a MSc in Genetic manipulation but the requirements to get on the course was a BSc in a related science, biology, chemistry or maths etc., so I am not sure Sociology would be applicable but I can't be certain.
  • 0

#8 Brainteaserfan

Brainteaserfan

    Atom

  • Senior Members
  • 369 posts

Posted 8 October 2011 - 05:12 PM

I don't really understand the whole american system, so don't really know what a senior is (I thought it was to do with highschool) but from the sounds of it you are in the final year of a sociology degree, you won't be able to go straight into a PHD from that basis, as to be honest you won't have a clue what you are doing, what would be the best option if you can get a place to do a Masters in Molecular Biology, Genetics or something similar and this will though not be specific for your interests of ageing will teach you about cancer, genetic diseases, how they occur and the many fundamental pathways that are important, as well as how way they go wrong (hence ageing).

I am currently studying a MSc in Genetic manipulation but the requirements to get on the course was a BSc in a related science, biology, chemistry or maths etc., so I am not sure Sociology would be applicable but I can't be certain.

Freshman= first year university or 9th grade
Sophomore= second or 10th
Junior= third or 11th
Senior = fourth year or 12th
  • 0

#9 Greippi

Greippi

    Baryon

  • Senior Members
  • 298 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 11 October 2011 - 02:21 PM

It does depend on the university you go to. For my undergraduate degree, the geneticists, microbiologists and biochemists all had lectures together. We could then diverge and pick modules based on our interests/core subjects in subsequent years. I think this was quite an important thing to have a broad knowledge and not focus too soon on one subject. Multidisciplinarity is useful these days.
  • 0
Time is an illusion - lunchtime doubly so.

#10 edwardreed

edwardreed

    Quark

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:25 AM

Manipulation of genetic material is genetic engineering. it includes isolation, manipulation and then reintroduction of genes. It has given us safe vaccines, biologically synthesized insulin, other useful proteins, introduced useful genes in plants so that we could get a more balanced food improved the yield and quality of crops such as tomatoes atc. Given us pest resistant cotton or Bt cotton, provided treatment for genetic diseases Many vitamins , enzymes, medicines, superior quality processed food are being made.

Edited by edwardreed, 21 October 2011 - 06:25 AM.

  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users