Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Where does the moon rise?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Primarygun

Primarygun

    Organism

  • Senior Members
  • 1,338 posts
  • LocationHong Kong Special Administrative region

Posted 25 July 2007 - 03:03 PM

All stars rise from the east except at the poles.
However, it is hard to determine whether the moon comes from the south-east or the north-east even when the relative positions of the earth and the moon is given.
Is there anybody who has a clever method to determine the direction in which the moon rises?
  • 0
It's hot :-p in summer

#2 fattyjwoods

fattyjwoods

    Banned

  • Banned
  • 157 posts
  • Locationkiwiland-New Zealand

Posted 9 August 2007 - 05:47 AM

The moon does not rise. It stays in the sky unlike the sun. eg in a clear day with no clouds you can faintly see the moon providing its before noon but then it just dissapears
failing to plan=planning to fail

#3 insane_alien

insane_alien

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 10,094 posts
  • LocationScotland

Posted 9 August 2007 - 12:05 PM

The moon does not rise. It stays in the sky unlike the sun. eg in a clear day with no clouds you can faintly see the moon providing its before noon but then it just dissapears



uhhh what? a huge mass of rock a quarter of the earths size just dissapears don't you think the apollo missions would have discovered that quite shockingly?

the moon does appear to rise just like the sun and stars due to the earths rotation and since it is also orbiting the earth the position and time it rises at can change.

a simple astronomy program can show you ith reasonable accuracy where it will rise. redshift is a good commercial program for it but if you want a free and opensource version then i recommend stellarium.
  • 0
Tired of waiting around for a reply on the forums? Use IRC, 'I don't know how' is no longer an excuse.

"Special" Relativity, stupid ideas seem smarter when they come at you really fast.

#4 Sisyphus

Sisyphus

    Trickster Archetype

  • Moderators
  • 6,212 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 9 August 2007 - 03:08 PM

The moon will rise and set within about 5% of where the sun rises and sets, because that's how much the plane of the Moon's orbit around the Earth is inclined to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun.

And yes, of course it rises and sets, for the same reason the Sun rises and sets: the Earth is spinning. It will make a complete circuit in approximately 24 hours, 50 minutes. (That is where tides come from.) The lunar "day" is longer than the solar day because the rotation of the Earth has to "catch up" with the moon, which is orbiting the Earth in the same direction the Earth is rotating.
  • 0
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

#5 fattyjwoods

fattyjwoods

    Banned

  • Banned
  • 157 posts
  • Locationkiwiland-New Zealand

Posted 10 August 2007 - 09:18 AM

sorry, my bad
failing to plan=planning to fail

#6 Jacques

Jacques

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 556 posts

Posted 10 August 2007 - 04:34 PM

Around new moon, it will rise around the same direction as the sun.
at first quarter the moon rise around the direction the sun will rise in 3 month. For example next first quarter this month is the 20th and it will rise where the sun will rise the 20th of November.
Full moon rise where the sun rise 6 month from now.
That is why winter full moon go so hight in the sky.
and last quarter where the sun was rising 3 month ago.

It is not precisse but it can help figuring out
  • 0

#7 Shadowwalker

Shadowwalker

    Quark

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • LocationPiedmont,S.C. 29673

Posted 17 April 2008 - 11:25 PM

Hello my name is Shadowwalker (Cherokee) and I'm new, I'm looking for an answer to a question I have been asking for years. Why does the Moon rise and set in the Day sky as well as in the night sky when it is supposed to be in their night sky(0n the other side of the Earth) disreguarding the principals I was taught all my life, I have heard all types of answers up to i'm seeing a mirror image of the moon---DUHHH the Earth is a circular object(well a semi pair shaped wobbly object) and it would be hard to reflect the image to rise and set. I hope I get a truthful an respectful answer.
  • 0

#8 Shadowwalker

Shadowwalker

    Quark

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • LocationPiedmont,S.C. 29673

Posted 18 April 2008 - 12:15 AM

To clear up a little detail so the question is a lil clearer, I see the moon in the daytime sky and in the nighttime sky as if it sets and rises with night and with day(on any clear day or night). you can go out on any day (of course it has to be a clear day)and see the moon in the daytime sky after it has already set from the nighttime sky and yes it does move across the sky during the daytime. That was the basis of the question I have asked over the years and still the answer eludes me.
  • 0

#9 Cap'n Refsmmat

Cap'n Refsmmat

    Mr. Wizard

  • Administrators
  • 11,750 posts
  • LocationTexas

Posted 18 April 2008 - 12:15 AM

The Moon orbits the Earth once every 28 days, not once every 24 hours, so it doesn't show up at consistent times. Instead, the Earth rotates around as the Moon moves relatively slowly, so your side of the planet rotates away from the Moon sometimes and rotates towards it sometimes. The Moon doesn't come into view exactly every 24 hours because it's also moving, so when your side of the Earth rotates away from the Moon it has to do slightly more than a full rotation to "catch up" with the Moon.

Because of this slight difference, the Moon rises at a different time every day -- sometimes during the day, sometimes during the night.
  • 0

Cap'n Refsmmat
SFN Administrator


#10 Shadowwalker

Shadowwalker

    Quark

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • LocationPiedmont,S.C. 29673

Posted 18 April 2008 - 12:26 AM

The Moon orbits the Earth once every 28 days, not once every 24 hours, so it doesn't show up at consistent times. Instead, the Earth rotates around as the Moon moves relatively slowly, so your side of the planet rotates away from the Moon sometimes and rotates towards it sometimes. The Moon doesn't come into view exactly every 24 hours because it's also moving, so when your side of the Earth rotates away from the Moon it has to do slightly more than a full rotation to "catch up" with the Moon.

Because of this slight difference, the Moon rises at a different time every day -- sometimes during the day, sometimes during the night.


I think you missed what the question asked -- I see the moon in the daytime sky and in the nighttime sky as if it sets and rises with night and with day(on any clear day or night). you can go out on any day (of course it has to be a clear day)and see the moon in the daytime sky after it has already set from the nighttime sky and yes it does move across the sky during the daytime. That was the basis of the question I have asked over the years and still the answer eludes me.
  • 0

#11 Cap'n Refsmmat

Cap'n Refsmmat

    Mr. Wizard

  • Administrators
  • 11,750 posts
  • LocationTexas

Posted 18 April 2008 - 12:45 AM

You'd only be able to see it during the day over half of the month (or, rather, the lunar cycle). The other half of the month it'll rise at night.
  • 0

Cap'n Refsmmat
SFN Administrator


#12 Cmac22

Cmac22

    Quark

  • Senior Members
  • 36 posts

Posted 22 April 2008 - 05:10 AM

I think you missed what the question asked -- I see the moon in the daytime sky and in the nighttime sky as if it sets and rises with night and with day(on any clear day or night). you can go out on any day (of course it has to be a clear day)and see the moon in the daytime sky after it has already set from the nighttime sky and yes it does move across the sky during the daytime. That was the basis of the question I have asked over the years and still the answer eludes me.



Im having trouble understanding your question but ill take a stab at it. I think this is what your asking but i could be completely wrong:

out at night you see the moon setting. then the next day you see the moon again. how is this possible?

Well, (if this is your question) then i think this is the answer though i might be wrong again haha. say your out at night and you see the moon setting at 9 PM. you go to bed and wake up the next day. you look outside around 10am or so and you see the moon rising.

basicly the moon will be in the sky a bit less than 12 hours a day. so if it sets at night, it will be rising again and in the sky 12 hours or so later!

i hope this answers your question!

but again its rising setting times change constantly because it is also orbiting the earth like others said. the moons a tricky little guy
  • 0

#13 TamiChee

TamiChee

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 8 September 2008 - 11:26 PM

I too have wondered, for a long time, where to expect the moon to rise in Arizona. I have lived here all my life (that's 40+ years) and don't have a feel for where it will show up. I have yet to find anyone with a confident answer to this question.
  • 0

#14 swansont

swansont

    Shaken, not stirred

  • Moderators
  • 27,880 posts
  • LocationWashington DC region

Posted 9 September 2008 - 09:04 PM

http://aa.usno.navy..../docs/AltAz.php

When the altitude is 0, that's the rise/set, and the azimuth tells you where to look.
  • 0

Minutus cantorum, minutus balorum, minutus carborata descendum pantorum                                   To shake my vodka martini, click the up arrow ^

I am not a minimum-wage government shill.             Forget it, Jake — it's Crackpottown.

My SFN blog: Swans on Tea                                                           

 

 

                                                                                                                     

 

 


#15 Tristgo

Tristgo

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 26 April 2010 - 05:02 PM

BTW There is quite a lot of information about the direction of the moon, sun and other celestial objects on my website and in the book I wrote about the subject. Hope you don't mind the shameless plug, but I hoped those reading this page might find them of some interest.

Edited by Phi for All, 7 May 2010 - 03:11 AM.
links removed

  • 0
www.naturalnavigator.com

#16 Phi for All

Phi for All

    Chief Executive Offworlder

  • Moderators
  • 12,603 posts
  • LocationCO, USA

Posted 7 May 2010 - 03:14 AM

BTW There is quite a lot of information about the direction of the moon, sun and other celestial objects on my website and in the book I wrote about the subject. Hope you don't mind the shameless plug, but I hoped those reading this page might find them of some interest.

We wouldn't have minded them if you would have contributed more than just the plugs and this one post. Participate, let us learn more about you, post some more and you can plug your book in your signature.
  • 0

#17 Shrinithi

Shrinithi

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 30 January 2012 - 12:56 PM

But how about a quarter moon? i ve observed it in the west at t start of night.. Am i right ?

Around new moon, it will rise around the same direction as the sun.
at first quarter the moon rise around the direction the sun will rise in 3 month. For example next first quarter this month is the 20th and it will rise where the sun will rise the 20th of November.
Full moon rise where the sun rise 6 month from now.
That is why winter full moon go so hight in the sky.
and last quarter where the sun was rising 3 month ago.

It is not precisse but it can help figuring out


  • 0

#18 D H

D H

    Physics Expert

  • Resident Experts
  • 3,631 posts
  • LocationHouston, Texas

Posted 30 January 2012 - 03:18 PM

But how about a quarter moon? i ve observed it in the west at t start of night.. Am i right ?

At first quarter, the moon rises more or less in the east at about local noon and sets more or less in the west at about local midnight. At sunset the first quarter moon is close to its maximum elevation and is more or less in the south (assuming you live in the northern hemisphere).

If you saw the moon in the west just after sunset you were probably looking at a waxing crescent moon rather than first quarter moon. Today (Jan 30, 2012), the moon is 45% of full, so it is one day shy of quarter moon.
  • 0

This is modern software; there's no useful manual. After all, changing how everything works every six months or so is more important than helping people use the features you have.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users