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Aharanov-Bohm effect and superconductivity


moth
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I noticed this article on propelling sub-atomic particles and the Aharanov-Bohm effect.
My limited understanding is that by manipulating the wave function of electrons using interference, they produce momentum in the electrons.
I remembered that the same kind of interference patterns obtained from a double slit arrangement can be seen whenever there are two distinct paths, for example around a very thin wire or possibly even around an atom or molecule.
Just wondered if anybody was familiar enough with superconductors to comment whether or not the interference between loose electrons and the atoms in a superconducting medium could interact like this to produce current?

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I'm not too familiar with it myself, however looking over the information I found on the subject I cannot see any violations. It's a process that looks intriquing and complies with the known models from what I've read thus far.

 

Waveforms can interact producing shorter and longer waveforms. A waveform change is a change in energy levels. So yes manipulating a waveform can induce current.

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Thanks Mordred. I've been trying to read as much as I can, but only found one or two indirect mentions of superconductivity.
This seems like an amazing result from the experiment in the article.
That the wave is some configuration while the particle accelerates sounds reasonable.
The particle accelerating because the wave is some configuration is a mind bender.
Apologies for mis-spelling Aharonov

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Waveforms can be influenced beforei I can answer accurately I need time to study the models involved. From the pop media descriptives I can see the plausibility. This will take take time, but no worries I will offer support.

Waveforms can be influenced before I can answer accurately I need time to study the models involved. From the pop media descriptives I can see the plausibility. This will take take time, but no worries I will offer support.

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I'm not sure I'll need much support as this is all far beyond my abilities, but thank you for the offer.
Cooper pairs seem pretty bazaar. Is it possible to explain Cooper pairs by overlapping or interacting wave functions?

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