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Subtext cipher?


CACHERX
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444 6 33 2 66 66 666 8 8 666 222 666 66 333 88 7777 33 999 666 88

444 5 88 7777 8 8 44 666 88 4 44 8 9 44 444 555 33 444 9 2 7777 3

666 444 66 4 7777 666 6 88 222 44 222 666 3 33 22 777 33 2 55 444

66 4 6 999 7777 33 555 333 444 9 666 88 555 3 3 777 666 7 666 66 33

666 333 6 999 666 9 66 444 6 4 666 666 3 9 444 8 44 66 88 6 22 33

777 7777 7777 666 444 5 88 7777 8 7777 8 88 222 55 9 444 8 44 9 44

2 8 444 55 66 666 9 44 666 7 33 999 666 88 33 66 5 666 999 33 3 444

8 66 666 777 8 44 333 666 777 8 999 3 33 4 777 33 33 7777 7777 33

888 33 66 2 66 3 333 444 888 33 44 88 66 3 777 33 3 333 444 333 8

999 333 666 88 777 9 33 7777 8 33 444 4 44 8 999 33 444 4 44 8 333

444 333 8 999 333 444 888 33 8 44 33 66 66 444 66 33 44 88 66 3 777

33 3 8 44 444 777 8 999 7777 33 888 33 66 666 55

 

Can anyone help with this one? I'm thinking somewhere in here are coordinates for a geocache? Just can figure it out.

 

 

Any help is appreciated.

 

 

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Have you tried just using a monoalphabetic substitution cipher? There seem to be about 23-25 different combinations - ie treat 444 as a single encoded letter. It is a nice variant on monoalphabetic if that is the case - the repeated digits immediately make you think that 3,33, and 333 must be connected in some way; but they could just be keying I, M, and A as an example. there are really good monoalphabetic substitution crackers available on the internet for download - I would give it a try, but I have just shifted to linux and I am having trouble with even the basics right now.

 

Good indications of a monoalphabetic cipher are the number of different encoded bits (I think about right from a rough count), a characteristic distribution (any decent length normal english text will have around 12pct Es and definitely not all equal - again looks ok), an acceptable number of double letters, and very few triples (zoo opening before any one say no english word has a triple - spaces are very rarely encrypted)

 

please let us know if you get any further

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Have you tried just using a monoalphabetic substitution cipher? There seem to be about 23-25 different combinations - ie treat 444 as a single encoded letter. It is a nice variant on monoalphabetic if that is the case - the repeated digits immediately make you think that 3,33, and 333 must be connected in some way; but they could just be keying I, M, and A as an example. there are really good monoalphabetic substitution crackers available on the internet for download - I would give it a try, but I have just shifted to linux and I am having trouble with even the basics right now.

 

Good indications of a monoalphabetic cipher are the number of different encoded bits (I think about right from a rough count), a characteristic distribution (any decent length normal english text will have around 12pct Es and definitely not all equal - again looks ok), an acceptable number of double letters, and very few triples (zoo opening before any one say no english word has a triple - spaces are very rarely encrypted)

 

please let us know if you get any further

 

I'm looking for the same cache, your comment was all I needed to solve it. Thanks. For the original poster ... think about phone texting in the days before they had nice little qwerty keyboards. From that it should take you only about 5 (tedious) minutes to decode the message. good luck finding the cache!

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  • 9 years later...

I think this is the message (10 years late lol), is it correct?


I MEAN NOT TO CONFUSE YOU
I JUST THOUGHT WHILE I WAS DOING 
SO MUCH CODE BREAKING MYSELF 
I WOULD DROP ONE OF MY OWN IM GOOD WITH NUMBERS 
SO I JUST STUCK WITH WHAT I KNOW 
HOPE YOU ENJOYED IT 
NORTH FORTY DEGREES SEVEN AND FIVE 
HUNDRED FIFTY FOUR WEST EIGHTY EIGHT 
FIFTY FIVE THEN NINE HUNDRED THIRTY SEVEN OK

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