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Klaynos

Water Water Everywhere...

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That is pretty cool. Although the article does say another team of scientists could not detect the water.

 

Is it's year only 3.5 days? The article says it passes in front of its star every 3.5 days. That is fast.

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that would indicate a close proximity (small mean orbit) to its sun and heat - lots of it. and a trajectory (sp?) rate very high - ????

 

a natural spectographic analysis - nice

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The radius of the planet's orbit is 7 million kilometers, ~0.047 astronomical units, one eighth the radius of Mercury's orbit. This small radius results in a year that is 3.5 Earth days long and an estimated surface temperature of about 1000 degrees Celsius or around 1800 degrees Fahrenheit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HD_209458_b

 

HD209458b is separated from its star by only about 4 million miles (7 million kilometers)—about 100 times closer than Jupiter is to our Sun—and is so hot scientists think about it is losing about 10,000 tons of material every second as vented gas.

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/070410_water_exoplanet.html

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A new theory of how planets form finds havens of stability amid violent turbulence in the swirling gas that surrounds a young star.

 

With the news of this new planet, and the controversy surrounding the

Big Bang Theory. I am curious what the general concensus is?

 

New planets are forming and evolving outside of the general theory.

And if this is the case, do we have to start the whole theory over,

by defining what a star is, and how they came to be?

 

 

Everlasting

Futuristic Science Fiction Novel

Moon Over Key Biscayne

 

:cool:

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It's more likely the theory needs modification rather than completely scrapping. That is very uncommon in modern physics.

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Water is exceedingly common in the cosmos, as revealed by spectroscopic analysis of the light from nebulae etc.

 

Planets are, apparently, also very common. It is tricky to detect any near Earth size around other stars, but it is reasonable to expect that, with lots of large planets being proven, lots of small ones also exist, even if not yet detected.

 

Most such planets have strongly elliptical orbits, but a few have almost circular orbits. Thus, it seems that, statistically, we will eventually find a planet in almost circular orbit, in the part of the stellar system that permits water to remain liquid. Such a planet will have liquid water - and quite likely in very large amounts. We will be delighted to make such a discovery, but should not be surprised.

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A new theory of how planets form finds havens of stability amid violent turbulence in the swirling gas that surrounds a young star.

 

With the news of this new planet, and the controversy surrounding the

Big Bang Theory. I am curious what the general concensus is?

 

New planets are forming and evolving outside of the general theory.

And if this is the case, do we have to start the whole theory over,

by defining what a star is, and how they came to be?

 

 

Everlasting

Futuristic Science Fiction Novel

Moon Over Key Biscayne

 

:cool:

 

What does this have to do with Big Bang theory? And theories are almost never started over, usually they are partially correct and just need to be changed.

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Water has been found on an extrasolar planet, according to the bbc...

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6544257.stm

 

The radius of the planet's orbit is 7 million kilometers, ~0.047 astronomical units, one eighth the radius of Mercury's orbit. This small radius results in a year that is 3.5 Earth days long and an estimated surface temperature of about 1000 degrees Celsius or around 1800 degrees Fahrenheit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HD_209458_b

 

HD209458b is separated from its star by only about 4 million miles (7 million kilometers)—about 100 times closer than Jupiter is to our Sun—and is so hot scientists think about it is losing about 10,000 tons of material every second as vented gas.

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/070410_water_exoplanet.html

 

water is found on a distant planet that has a surface temperature of about 1000 degrees Celsius and is loosing about 10,000 tons of material every second? How does this water survive, and how on earth did they find it in these conditions?

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Our Earth has 1000,000,000,000,000,000 tonnes of sea water. If we lost 10,000 tonnes each second, it would take nearly 200 million years to lose it all.

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Oh... fair enough. Thanks for shedding light on my misunderstanding.

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