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Carbon capture in a car


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I have seen pretty recent studies about how scientists are using a liquid metal alloy to make co2 solid. I was thinking about applying this concept to cars. The idea is that the exhaust pipes direct the exhaust into a wide container containing the liquid metal, and the co2 reacts with the metal to form carbon flakes that adhere to the sides of the container. This allows the process to keep on going for a long time, which allows for drives that actually last for more than 10 seconds. One thing that might be a problem is all the other gasses, such as nitrogen oxide, that are part of the exhaust, which won't be turned into solid by the liquid metal. Another problem might be that the liquid metal may slosh around a lot when the car is driving. Anyways, I just want some feedback as whether my idea is even feasible or possible. Thanks!

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18 minutes ago, sick0l_pick0l said:

I have seen pretty recent studies about how scientists are using a liquid metal alloy to make co2 solid. I was thinking about applying this concept to cars. The idea is that the exhaust pipes direct the exhaust into a wide container containing the liquid metal, and the co2 reacts with the metal to form carbon flakes that adhere to the sides of the container. This allows the process to keep on going for a long time, which allows for drives that actually last for more than 10 seconds. One thing that might be a problem is all the other gasses, such as nitrogen oxide, that are part of the exhaust, which won't be turned into solid by the liquid metal. Another problem might be that the liquid metal may slosh around a lot when the car is driving. Anyways, I just want some feedback as whether my idea is even feasible or possible. Thanks!

So he went into the garden to cut a cabbage leaf to make an apple pie. Just then, a great she bear popped her head into the corner of the shop and said, “What? No soap? So he died, and she very imprudently married the barber.......(continues)........

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Modern cars are so weight sensitive that I would say it's a non-starter. Also, it's an idea past it's sell by date, with electric cars coming in. In any case, the energy input/output balance sheet seems to make it impractical. To release the energy from the fuel, you are combining oxygen to carbon, with it's resultant energy release. It stands to reason that to break that carbon/oxygen bond, you will need more energy than you got making that bond. And you also need some of the energy to move the car. 

For that reason, I wouldn't think that it's practical for use with ships or trains either. 

This method of producing carbon might be of some use, where you have huge quantities of high grade waste heat going to waste. Wherever that is. A power station maybe? 

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2 hours ago, sick0l_pick0l said:

I have seen pretty recent studies about how scientists are using a liquid metal alloy to make co2 solid. I was thinking about applying this concept to cars. The idea is that the exhaust pipes direct the exhaust into a wide container containing the liquid metal, and the co2 reacts with the metal to form carbon flakes that adhere to the sides of the container. This allows the process to keep on going for a long time, which allows for drives that actually last for more than 10 seconds. One thing that might be a problem is all the other gasses, such as nitrogen oxide, that are part of the exhaust, which won't be turned into solid by the liquid metal. Another problem might be that the liquid metal may slosh around a lot when the car is driving. Anyways, I just want some feedback as whether my idea is even feasible or possible. Thanks!

This isn't going to work, sorry.

If something is turning CO2 into pure carbon, where is the oxygen going? What is powering the process? You can't make carbon from CO2 without using as much energy as carbon burning to make CO2 produces. Hydrocarbon combustion includes hydrogen becoming H2O but most of the energy is from carbon becoming CO2; any reverse process will use at least as much energy as burning the fuel produces with none left over for driving the car.

Any collection of CO2 itself - leaving out any making it solid or conversion to "carbon flakes" - would accumulate around 3 times the weight of fuel burned, without considering the weight of the liquid metal and hardware required and the extra fuel consumption running it plus running a car that is much heavier.

Battery electric cars powered by low/zero emissions energy are now a proven, viable low/zero emissions option. Major vehicle manufacturers are already committing to it.

Edited by Ken Fabian
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11 hours ago, Bufofrog said:

I guess this is what the OP is talking about:  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-08824-8

Aha, that’s it! Then I was being unfair to the poster who I thought was talking gibberish. (It was the drives lasting longer than 10 seconds that really threw me.)

I must admit I am not sure how useful electrochemical réduction of CO2 to carbon really is, considering the energy input required.

 

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