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Cryogenic liquids storage


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Posted (edited)

Which principle may permit to store cryogenic liquids such as methane, hydrogen or nitrogen for almost indefinitely long time in liquid state without energy losses? For example there is such an effect:

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A less widely known quantum behavior is dynamical localization, a phenomenon in which a quantum object stays at the same temperature despite a steady supply of energy—bucking the assumption that a cold object will always steal heat from a warmer object.

Quantum gases won't take the heat (phys.org)

Could we create a dynamic localization in cryogenic liquids somehow?

Edited by Bond777
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It’s a huge leap from a quantum object behaving a certain way to having a liquid behave that way

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1 hour ago, swansont said:

It’s a huge leap from a quantum object behaving a certain way to having a liquid behave that way

There is such thing as a "quantum liquids".

Quantum fluid - Wikipedia

Some claim even at room temperature.

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The results of the work suggest that superfluid quantum liquid may arise at room temperature as a result of the functioning of many-particle quantum superposition.

room temperature quantum liquid - Google Search

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13 hours ago, Bond777 said:

There is such thing as a "quantum liquids".

Quantum fluid - Wikipedia

Some claim even at room temperature.

Yes, there is, but you didn't specify this in your OP. You simply said cryogenic liquids, and gave examples that are not quantum liquids, so this is irrelevant.

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2 hours ago, swansont said:

Yes, there is, but you didn't specify this in your OP. You simply said cryogenic liquids, and gave examples that are not quantum liquids, so this is irrelevant.

Possibly some additives could convert regular cryogenic liquids into liquids with quantum properties?

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7 minutes ago, Bond777 said:

Possibly some additives could convert regular cryogenic liquids into liquids with quantum properties?

No, that’s not how it works. Quantum fluids have specific properties (typically the spin), which aren’t going to change with an additive.

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Posted (edited)
52 minutes ago, swansont said:

No, that’s not how it works. Quantum fluids have specific properties (typically the spin), which aren’t going to change with an additive.

What if we have droplets of a regular cryogenic liquid which are embedded in a thing layers of a quantum fluid like a bubbles? If some quantum fluids won't take any heat, shouldn't they serve as an ultimate and absolute heat insulators? And prevent to take any heat to the liquids they embed within themselves?

Edited by Bond777
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1 hour ago, Bond777 said:

What if we have droplets of a regular cryogenic liquid which are embedded in a thing layers of a quantum fluid like a bubbles? If some quantum fluids won't take any heat, shouldn't they serve as an ultimate and absolute heat insulators? And prevent to take any heat to the liquids they embed within themselves?

It’s quite likely that a contaminant in a quantum fluid messes everything up, since the fluid can interact with it, and those would not be the interaction that make a quantum fluid act as a quantum fluid.

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8 minutes ago, swansont said:

It’s quite likely that a contaminant in a quantum fluid messes everything up, since the fluid can interact with it, and those would not be the interaction that make a quantum fluid act as a quantum fluid.

Could we make some solid quantum sponge then?

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On 5/17/2021 at 1:29 AM, swansont said:

It’s a huge leap from a quantum object behaving a certain way to having a liquid behave that way

Would I be reasonably correct in thinking that the product of mean particle momentum and mean particle separation would need to be oto Planck's constant?

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12 minutes ago, sethoflagos said:

Would I be reasonably correct in thinking that the product of mean particle momentum and mean particle separation would need to be oto Planck's constant?

Typically, yes, the deBroglie wavelength exceeds the separation.

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