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asd2791

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Meson

Meson (3/13)

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  1. According to my hypothesis, air and pressure are related to each other. pressure alone does not work, and air alone does not work. They must come together.
  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) causes a lack of oxygen supply, and people with it suffer from poor sleep. correction: Sleep reduces the amount of air entering the lungs per minute.
  3. I did not find any mention of “sleep” on the link you referred to, and when I researched the nature of sleep among the Apollo astronauts, I found information that supports my hypothesis. The following was stated in "discover magazine": on Apollo 11: "Sleeping in the LM became a battle to find what Armstrong called in the post-flight debriefing “a minimum level of sleeping conditions,” and it was a battle they lost. “The rest period was almost a complete loss,” he said." on Apollo 14: "Al Shepard and Ed Mitchell didn’t have much of a better night than their lunar predecessors [ reference to former Apollo astronauts ]." Thanks for the help in finding additional evidence for my hypothesis
  4. you say: "Astronauts breathing low pressure air enriched with oxygen", This information is not precise, the atmospheric pressure inside the International Space Station is 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi; 1.0 atm) 79% nitrogen, 21% oxygen. and the standard atmosphere is a unit of pressure defined as 101,3 kPa "This information is on Wikipedia and other sites"
  5. All these studies say that high pressure causes narcosis , and low pressure causes difficulty sleeping. Despite all that, you say it is not evidence?!!! I am not 100% certain, but this scientific evidences for my hypothesis is worth considering.
  6. I read new evidence in Wikipedia: "At altitudes above 7,500 m (24,600 ft, 383 millibars of atmospheric pressure), sleeping becomes very difficult." References Cymerman, A; Rock, PB. Medical Problems in High Mountain Environments. A Handbook for Medical Officers (Report). Vol. USARIEM-TN94-2. US Army Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division Technical Report. Archived from the original on 23 /4/2009. Retrieved 5 /3/2009. Rose, MS; Houston, CS; Fulco, CS; Coates, G; Sutton, JR; Cymerman, A (12/1988). "Operation Everest. II: Nutrition and body composition". J. Appl. Physiol. 65 (6): 2545–51. doi:10.1152/jappl.1988.65.6.2545. PMID 3215854. Kayser, B. (October 1992). "Nutrition and high altitude exposure". Int J Sports Med. 13 (Suppl 1): S129–32. doi:10.1055/s-2007-1024616. PMID 1483750. S2CID 5787317.
  7. Ok, No Problem Maybe I'm too quick to judge all gases But most components of the atmosphere we breathe naturally have this effect.
  8. all gases that can be breathed have a narcotic effect, although widely varying in degree. look here: https://journals.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/jappl.1970.29.1.23
  9. Again I'm not talking about a specific gas, my talk is about "breathing gases". and the breathing rate determines the amount of breathing gases that enter the body. This is self-evident, and if the breathing rate does not affect the amount of gases that enter the body, why does the breathing rate increase with exercise?
  10. There is an error here:: correct is: If it is not influential, then there is no need to mention it. I have clearly stated the similarities, reread number 6. I had a translation error, please re-read the following: that sleep occurs due to the accumulation of “Breathing gas” melting in the human body, and these gases dissolve more whenever the atmospheric pressure is greater, and sleep reduces the number of breathing times by 73% in some of its stages6 , but because the pressure in the sea is high, “Narcosis while diving” occurs within minutes, unlike atmospheric pressure, it is much lower, so the effect takes about 16 hours for drowsiness and sleep to begin.
  11. But the children's nervous system will be smaller, and this, in my view, will cancel the effect of the difference in size and capacity
  12. That's why I call it a hypothesis. Others may call it that, anyway, thanks for noticing. I am not attempting in this hypothesis to identify a single gas responsible for sleep, what I want to say is that sleep may occur by the same mechanism as “Narcosis while diving” The table shows the link yes
  13. I would like to know your opinion on this hypothesis? Abstract: The multiple hypotheses proposed to explain the function of sleep reflect the incomplete understanding of the subject, and through this paper I attempt to put forward an evidencesupported hypothesis on the function of sleep that has not been highlighted. In this research, I relied on previous researches, analyzed them, and linked them , And i came up with a new hypothesis of sleep function, My hypothesis says : that sleep occurs due to the accumulation of “Breathing gas” melting in the human body, and these gases dissolve more whenever the atmospheric pressure is greater, and sleep reduces the number of breathing times by 73% in some of its stages1, and therefore The amount of dissolved gases in the body decreases. Introduction: The multiple hypotheses proposed to explain the function of sleep reflect the incomplete understanding of the subject. While some functions of sleep are known, others have been proposed but not completely substantiated or understood. Some of the early ideas about sleep function were based on the fact that most (if not all) external activity is stopped during sleep. Initially, it was thought that sleep was simply a mechanism for the body to "take a break" and reduce wear1. This theory is not fully adequate as sleep only decreases metabolism by about 5–10%2,3 . With the development of EEG, it was found that the brain has almost continuous internal activity during sleep, leading to the idea that the function could be that of reorganization or specification of neuronal circuits or strengthening of connections4,5. These hypotheses are still being explored. Other proposed functions of sleep include maintaining hormonal balance, temperature regulation and maintaining heart rate. and through this paper I attempt to put forward an evidence-supported new hypothesis on the function of sleep that has not been highlighted. Material and Methods: In this research, I relied on previous research, analyzed them, and linked them. and I found a clear link and similarity between "sleep" and "Narcosis while diving". Results: I formulated a new hypothesis: that sleep occurs due to the accumulation of “Breathing gas” melting in the human body, and these gases dissolve more whenever the atmospheric pressure is greater, and sleep reduces the number of breathing times by 73% in some of its stages6 , but because the pressure in the sea is high, “deep numbness” occurs within minutes, unlike atmospheric pressure, it is much lower, so the effect takes about 16 hours for drowsiness and sleep to begin. Discussion: Since any theory or hypothesis must have evidence, I present a set of evidences for this hypothesis: 1- When diving in the sea, the pressure is great, and a phenomenon known to divers occurs called “Narcosis while diving” The greater the depth of diving, the greater the effect of “Narcosis while diving”. 2- 2- All the components of “breathing gas” have a narcotic effect7,8 ,and this effect increases as the pressure increases, and the more the gas has a greater ability to dissolve in fat9. 3- Hot air is less pressured than cold air, and the night is often colder than the day, so in the night is often “atmospheric pressure” higher than the day, and therefore the desire to sleep increases at night to increase the “atmospheric pressure” in night , and increase the melting of “breathing gas” in the body . 4- A study indicated that exposure to heat increases alertness10, and this is consistent with this hypothesis, because the hot weather is less pressured, and therefore the melting of “Breathing gas” in the body is less. 5- Sleep duration can also vary according to season. Up to 90% of people report longer sleep duration in winter, which may lead to more pronounced seasonal affective disorder11,12 winter is colder and therefore the "atmospheric pressure" must be greater in it often, and therefore the melting of "breathing gas" in the body is greater. 6- The similarity between sleep and “Narcosis while diving”, a study described that “Narcosis while diving” is similar to the effect of benzodiazepines13, in other studies, they said: “Narcosis while diving” allows for a faster decrease in body temperature14,15 ,16 and this is what happens when mammals sleep17. 7- There is a clear link between hours of sleep and the amount of "Breathing gas" entering the human body. The more respiratory rate, the more hours of sleep, and the lower the respiratory rate, the fewer hours of sleep, As evident from Table . Table: age group respiratory rate18 sleep duration19 New Baby 40-50 /minute Between 14 and 17 hours lactation phase 30 /minute Between 12 and 15 hours Baby 20-25 /minute Between 11 and 14 hours adolescence 16-19 /minute Between 8 and 10 hours puberty 12-15 /minute Between 7 and 8 hours References 1 Wolstenholme GE, O'Connor M (1961). Ciba Foundation symposium on the nature of sleep. Boston: Little, Brown. ISBN 978-0-470-71922-0. 2 Sleep Syllabus. B. The Phylogeny of Sleep . Sleep Research Society, Education Committee. Archived from the original on 2005-03-18. Retrieved 26/9/2010. 3 Function of Sleep. Scribd.com. Retrieved on 1/12/2011. 4 Krueger JM, Obál F, Fang J (6/1999). "Why we sleep: a theoretical view of sleep function". Sleep Medicine Reviews. 3 (2): 119– 29. doi:10.1016/S1087-0792(99)90019-9. PMID 15310481 5 Krueger JM, Obál F (6/1993). "A neuronal group theory of sleep function". Journal of Sleep Research. 2 (2): 63–69. doi:10.1111/j.1365- 2869.1993.tb00064.x. PMID 10607073 6 Respiration during sleep in normal man. N J Douglas, D P White, C K Pickett, J V Weil, C W Zwillich 7 Bennett, Peter; Rostain, Jean Claude (2003). "Inert Gas Narcosis". In Brubakk, Alf O; Neuman, Tom S. Bennett and Elliott's physiology and medicine of diving (5th ed.). United States: Saunders. ISBN 0-7020-2571-2. OCLC 51607923 8 Bauer, Ralph W.; Way, Robert O. (1970). "Relative narcotic potencies of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, and their mixtures 9 Bennett, Peter; Rostain, Jean Claude (2003). "Inert Gas Narcosis". In Brubakk, Alf O; Neuman, Tom S. Bennett and Elliott's physiology and medicine of diving (5th ed.). United States: Saunders. ISBN 0-7020-2571-2. OCLC 51607923 10 Effects of thermal environment on sleep and circadian rhythm, Kazue Okamoto-Mizunocorresponding and Koh Mizuno. 11 Suzuki M, Taniguchi T, Furihata R, Yoshita K, Arai Y, Yoshiike N, Uchiyama M (18/4/2019). "Seasonal changes in sleep duration and sleep "problems: A prospective study in Japanese community residents 12 Hate waking up when it's dark out? Find out how winter really affects your sleep habits. 13 Hobbs M (2008). "Subjective and behavioural responses to nitrogen narcosis and alcohol". Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine : Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc 35 (3): 175–84. 14 Doolette, David J. ( 2008)، "2: Inert Gas Narcosis"، Mount, Tom؛ Dituri, Joseph ()، Exploration and Mixed Gas Diving Encyclopedia ، Miami Shores, Florida: International Association of Nitrox Divers 15 Mekjavic, Igor B.؛ Passias, T.؛ Sundberg, Carl Johan؛ Eiken, O. (1994)، "Perception of thermal comfort during narcosis"، Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine، Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society 16 Mekjavic, Igor B.؛ Savić, S. A.؛ Eiken, O. ( 1995)، "Nitrogen narcosis attenuates shivering thermogenesis"، Journal of Applied Physiology، American Physiological Society 17 Effects of thermal environment on sleep and circadian rhythm, Kazue Okamoto-Mizunocorresponding and Koh Mizuno 18 Age related reference ranges for respiration rate and heart rate from 4 to 16 years. Wallis et al, Arch Dis Child. 2005 19 Hirshkowitz, Max; Whiton, Kaitlyn; Albert, Steven M.; Alessi, Cathy; Bruni, Oliviero; DonCarlos, Lydia; Hazen, Nancy; Herman, John; Katz, Eliot S.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Neubauer, David N.; O'Donnell, Anne E.; Ohayon, Maurice; Peever, John; Rawding, Robert ( 2015). "National Sleep Foundation's sleep time duration recommendations: methodology and results summary". Sleep Health. 19 Hirshkowitz, Max; Whiton, Kaitlyn; Albert, Steven M.; Alessi, Cathy; Bruni, Oliviero; DonCarlos, Lydia; Hazen, Nancy; Herman, John; Katz, Eliot S.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Neubauer, David N.; O'Donnell, Anne E.; Ohayon, Maurice; Peever, John; Rawding, Robert ( 2015). "National Sleep Foundation's sleep time duration recommendations: methodology and results summary". Sleep Health.
  14. What do you think of this hypothesis (for a sleep function)? url deleted
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