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Battery terminals corrosion deterrent...


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#1 Externet

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 07:59 AM

Read somewhere that the felt pads placed on car battery posts were impregnated in baking soda.
Baking soda works extremely well in removing corrosion formations, but for prevention, something does not 'click'

These work very well; what are they impregnated with ? It is not dusty, it is not oily, it is not wet :

http://www.theranger...y/felt_ring.jpg

And they have lasted many years in my cars doing an excellent work.
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#2 Arthur Dent

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 11:41 AM

The corrosion is produced by the normal process of sulfation and electrolysis where minute amounts of electrolyte migrate between the seal of the battery posts and the plastic, causing any metal it's in contact with to turn into sulfates (Pb, Al, Cu)... Baking soda indeed neutralizes that process somehow, so those felt pads might be either saturated with it, or Ammonium Sulfate (NH4)2SO4.

Personally, a plain old brass wire brush and some ammonia-based window cleaner is all I use on the corroded posts of old batteries and battery clips, and they look like brand new!

- Robert
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#3 PaulS1950

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Posted 6 July 2010 - 03:39 AM

The felt rings are impregnated with an oily corrosion inhibitor. It helps to seal the posts to the case. That is why they last for years and never foam up as they would if they were impregnated with baking soda (Sodium Bicarbonate).
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#4 Externet

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Posted 6 July 2010 - 03:57 AM

Do you know what exactly is that 'oily' inhibitor compound ? Those felts do not feel oily at all.
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#5 PaulS1950

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Posted 7 July 2010 - 07:44 AM

No, but if you look in the bottom of the can it has an oil in it.
I have cans of those protectors that I have had for twenty years... still good!
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#6 Izzy_Bee

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Posted 7 July 2010 - 06:30 PM

I think maybe they could be treated with a liquid/ oily one i use on my car its a rust preventer/remover. it contains XYLENE, it is good but very harmful in many ways. Its turns any rust purple and does not foam at all. I use it around my battery as the plate it sits on is a little rusted at the minute till i replacce it.

If you need more information contact Alan Ward UK ON 01543570333 uk number
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#7 Zolar V

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Posted 7 July 2010 - 07:09 PM

Here is an idea to keep your terminals clean and without corrosion.

clean your terminals so there is no rust left upon them, then make a small sealant rign around the terminal, fill the small bowl shape with a liquid or maybe a some type of semisolid fluid, then apply sealant to the top. Basically form a cavity around the terminal and the wires that connect your car to the battery, fill the cavity with a substance that is and inhibitor to the compounds within the battery.. Just kinda thought of this.
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#8 PaulS1950

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Posted 7 July 2010 - 09:15 PM

Back when I first entered the mechanics field we used grease - the same grease we used to pack bearings with to seall the battery posts. we just cleaned them shiny and coated them with grease and then installed the terminal and clamped it tight.
That worked well but the grease eventually hardened and lost its seal.
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#9 Externet

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Posted 7 July 2010 - 09:37 PM

Thanks.
Yes, grease, vaseline, wax and several commercial sprays are available, all of them by coating the metals to protect.
But those felt washers do work apparently only by 'being present' That is what draws my curiosity.
Robert mentions something I did not take in account before, the gap between the case and posts blocked by the felt as a barrier to acid leak activity. Still unsure if plain baking soda is the inhibiting agent in them.
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#10 PaulS1950

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Posted 8 July 2010 - 11:22 PM

Baking soda will foam when exposed to battery acid - they don't .
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#11 Externet

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Posted 9 July 2010 - 12:17 AM

A solution of baking soda does foam if in contact with the sulphates corroding the metal. But in dry felt-impregnated powder form, to my humble knowledge, don't think so.

Battery acid (wet) and dry baking soda probably does too. A liquish is needed to make bubbles.
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