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are fungi prokaryotes?


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#1 jazzoff

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:16 PM

Hey, guys, i am just a beginner, and hope you will bear with me for a while. Are fungi prokaryotes? What makes prokaryotes...PROKARYOTES? :confused:
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#2 Primarygun

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:49 PM

In my country, fungi is classified into the fungi kingdom but not the prokaryote kingdom.
Prokaryote kingdom consists of organisms which has simple structure, most are singular-cell and some has simple muticellular structure.
Some examples: Algae, paramecium, Amoeba
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#3 Skye

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 01:54 PM

Prokaryotes don't have a nucleus, they include the bacteria and archaea. Fungi have nuclei and so they are eukaryotes.

Prokaryote kingdom consists of organisms which has simple structure, most are singular-cell and some has simple muticellular structure.
Some examples: Algae, paramecium, Amoeba

They are all eukaryotes. You are probably getting confused with protists.
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#4 YT2095

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 01:55 PM

I remember asking the same question (many years ago) and was told to think of them as Plants without chlorophyll, I don`t know if that`s any good to you?
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#5 Hellbender

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 02:23 PM

I remember asking the same question (many years ago) and was told to think of them as Plants without chlorophyll, I don`t know if that`s any good to you?

I was told in high school bio to think of them as halfway between plants and animals, but that is good too.
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#6 Paramecium

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 02:24 PM

Fungi are all eucaryotes, it means they have DNA in nucleus, and have membranous organelles in the cell like endoplasmic reticulum, golgi aparatus, lysosomes, mitochondrias etc.. They are saprofytic which means they decompose organic compounds to a smaller compounds (inorganic compounds) so they are heterotrophic (thus they no have chloroplasts) they play role in ecosystem as reducers. There are very similar organisms in procaryotes which are called actinomycetes. But these are classified as bacteries.
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#7 Dak

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 02:40 PM

its confused by the fact that some moulds arent actually fungi. some, eg water moulds and plasmodial/slime moulds, are protists (eukaryotes); others, like the blerdeburghcantremember moulds, are bacteria (prokaryotes).

other than the moulds-which-arent-the-same-as-the-other-moulds, fungi (mushrooms, fungus, (most) molds, yeast etc) are eukaryotes.

lichens further complicate it, by being a symbiotic species consisting of fungi and a photosynthetic partner, either a chlorophyta (green algae: a eukaryotic protist) or a cyanobacter, (a prokaryotic protist ? )

so i dont know what youd classify cyanobacter lichens as.
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#8 Paramecium

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 03:24 PM

Dak wrote

lichens further complicate it, by being a symbiotic species consisting of fungi and a photosynthetic partner, either a chlorophyta (green algae: a eukaryotic protist) or a cyanobacter, (a prokaryotic protist ? )


Cyanobacters are procaryotic thus not protists :cool: . Protists are eucaryotic unicellular organisms. Also i dont think that symbiosis of fungi with algae or with cyanobacters complicate something cause fungi in lichens still belongs to subdivisions of division eumycota which belongs to kingdom -fungi- for example they can belongs to subdivision ascomycetes (the most often case) or basidiomycetes. Lichenism is only very well developed symbyosis, it is not the one organism.
About slime moulds - they are classified either protists or as the second division of kingdom fungi - myxomycota. (the first as i said is eumycota)
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#9 Primarygun

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 06:58 AM

In my country, fungi is classified into the fungi kingdom but not the prokaryote kingdom.
Prokaryote kingdom consists of organisms which has simple structure, most are singular-cell and some has simple muticellular structure.
Some examples: Algae, paramecium, Amoeba

OH Sorry, That's protoctist.
REally sorry
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#10 jazzoff

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 08:21 AM

Thanks guys. :)
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#11 Dak

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 01:43 PM

Cyanobacters are procaryotic thus not protists


I was tought that they were blue-green algae, and a member of the algae (ie, protists), although it was by a 150 year old lecturer, who said alot of other taxonomically questionable stuff.

What are lichens? are they a single species? or are they two species?
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#12 Paramecium

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 04:26 PM

Yeah 150 years, many things changed in this field over this time. Cyanobacters are clasified as one of the main groups of bacteries, have no nucleus and no membranous organelles thus are procaryotic(as all bacteries).
But they have chlorophyl a, thats why they were supposed to be algae long time ago.
Every lichen consists of mycobiont and fotobiont. Mycobiont means fungus and fotobiont alga or cyanobacter. Mycobiont is one species of fungus(the name of lichen depends on the species of fungus) which can live with one or two photobionts(every is one species). So it is not one organism but very well developed form of symbiosis of two or three organisms (fungus and one or two algae). Because mycobiont cannot live without photobiont they behave as single organism.
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#13 Dr_666

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Posted 13 July 2005 - 07:28 AM

In my country, fungi is classified into the fungi kingdom but not the prokaryote kingdom.
Prokaryote kingdom consists of organisms which has simple structure, most are singular-cell and some has simple muticellular structure.
Some examples: Algae, paramecium, Amoeba


In planet Earth, as far as I know, prokaryotes are not a kingdom. The term prokaryotes refers to cells that lack a nucleus (karyon, nucleus in Greek), as opposed to eukaryotic cells (which have a nucleus).

Prokaryotes include bacteria and archaea. Have a look at this:

http://www.ucmp.berk...reedomains.html

Let me know if you need more information,

Dr_666
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#14 Bluenoise

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Posted 13 July 2005 - 03:13 PM

I remember asking the same question (many years ago) and was told to think of them as Plants without chlorophyll, I don`t know if that`s any good to you?


It may interest you to know that fungi are more closely related to animals then to plants. plants branched off from our evolutionary line before fungi did.
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