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moth
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The pop-sci version of massive objects accelerating to the speed of light says it would require more energy to reach c than all the energy of the universe, is it possible a color confinement analogy might take effect?
If one could double the energy of the universe by accelerating a massive object close enough to c, could you get two metaverse? Like pulling a quark out of a hadron gives two hadrons.

Edited by moth
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The pop-sci version of massive objects accelerating to the speed of light says it would require more energy to reach c than all the energy of the universe, is it possible a color confinement analogy might take effect?

If one could double the energy of the universe by accelerating a massive object close enough to c, could you get two metaverse? Like pulling a quark out of a hadron gives two hadrons.

 

 

Lets say to objects are accelerating away from each other at 75% the speed of light. From each others view point, they are moving away from each other from 150% the speed of light... I think thats how it works. But then the universe is expanding, and everything is moving away from each other.

 

I don't understand what you mean in the second paragraph.

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Lets say to objects are accelerating away from each other at 75% the speed of light. From each others view point, they are moving away from each other from 150% the speed of light... I think thats how it works. But then the universe is expanding, and everything is moving away from each other.

 

I don't understand what you mean in the second paragraph.

Uh-err...

 

Nope - that is precisely not how it works. With normal speeds if I am travelling north at 75 mph (33.5m/s) and you are going south on the same road at 75mph then our closing speed is 150 miles per hour etc. But with relativistic velocities (ie an appreciable fraction of the speed of light) you must use the relativistic formula for relative velocoties

 

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/relativ/einvel2.html

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velocity-addition_formula#Special_theory_of_relativity

 

[latex]s= \frac{v+u}{1+\frac{vu}{c^2}}[/latex]

 

You can use this formula for all speeds - not just relativistic. But if you run the figures

 

[latex]s= \frac{v+u}{1+\frac{vu}{c^2}} = \frac{33.5+33.5}{1+\frac{1122.25}{9*10^{16}}}[/latex]

 

the standard method using 33.5m/s North and 33.5 m/s South gives a relative velocity of 67 m/s - this is only incorrect by 1*10^-12 m/s - see the sums

 

if however we crank the speed up to say 2*10^8 m/s in opposite directions.

 

[latex]s=\frac{v+u}{1+\frac{vu}{c^2}}=\frac{2*10^8+2*10^8}{1+\frac{4*10^{16}}{9*10^{16}}}[/latex]

 

 

Instead of getting the nonsensical answer of 4*10^8 m/s (nothing measures an object in relative motion past its window at over the SofL) we get the much more sensible answer of 2.77*10^8m/s - sums here

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I don't understand what you mean in the second paragraph.

 

 

Well, it seemed reasonable last night. Today the fever is down and I'll have to think about it.

 

If it's H5N1 is it the flew?

 

Edited by moth
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