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Buddhism is perhaps one of the freest religions along with Taoism because Buddhists (and also Taoists to some extent) do not believe and do not worship an external coercive God.

 

I would hardly call them free, they have strict dogmas and in some ways could be seen as extremely repressive given that true Buddhism requires that you forgo all material possessions, and attachments.

 

Some might argue that this in fact is a form of freedom, but certainly the practices of buddhism and taoism are not without their dogma, and rules.

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I would hardly call them free, they have strict dogmas and in some ways could be seen as extremely repressive given that true Buddhism requires that you forgo all material possessions, and attachments.

 

Some might argue that this in fact is a form of freedom, but certainly the practices of buddhism and taoism are not without their dogma, and rules.

 

Buddhism doesn't "require" anything of anyone (with the exception of ordained monks). It teaches the reality of cause/effect, impermanence, and relativity, and that we are the heirs of our own actions. Even the concepts of "good" and "bad" are ultimately understood as stumbling blocks on the path to being awake and present.

 

Nor does it require forgoing material possessions (unless one is ordained into a monastic life). There are no rules against material possessions for lay people...the teachings simply ask us to see material possessions clearly for what they are and are not. The same goes for our patterns of thought and our behavior...it asks us to examine carefully the true nature and skillfulness or non-skillfulness (the cause and effect) of our thoughts and actions. There are no strict dogmas, because it is understood that the state of being awake includes the absence of concretized beliefs.


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Buddhism is perhaps one of the freest religions along with Taoism because Buddhists (and also Taoists to some extent) do not believe and do not worship an external coercive God.

 

http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma3/budgod.html

 

Not all practitioners of Buddhism regard it as a religion. For some it is a philosophy, for some a psychology or science of mind, for some it is just a way of life. While the institution has taken on a heavy religious flavor since Westerners discovered Buddhism and projected a western concept of "religion" onto it, many teachers of Buddhism use skillful means in determining how to present the essence of the teachings which are easily transmitted through the conceptual structure of however it is regarded...for example: to those who see it as a science of mind, they will teach it as a science of mind. It's the principles that are important, not the package. If they need to use religion to deliver the principles, they will - but "religion" itself is just another concept to be let go of.

Edited by pink_trike
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The only thing I like about Buddhism is that Buddhists do not want to be "slaves" to an external God.

 

About all things being imparmanent, I'm not sure about that. The universe and the outer reaches of space could be eternal and permanent.

 

Even stars & planets change, die, and explode/implode.

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Even stars & planets change, die, and explode/implode.

 

But what about fundametal particles like electrons and photons? Are they also impermanent?

 

God's spirit is also eternal and impermanent in some sense because it existed before the universe ever came to be.

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