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g/L to weight%- Chemistry help


Ruthie
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Hello all,

I have a solution from a sugar refinery and I know the concentrate (in g/L) of the sugar. How do I convert this to weight %? I'm thinking I need to use the density, but does it have to be the density of the sugar solution or density of water (I'm not even sure if the sugar is dissolved in water- it looks like brown viscous liquid from the refinery)? Thanks in advance.

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2 minutes ago, Ruthie said:

Hello all,

I have a solution from a sugar refinery and I know the concentrate (in g/L) of the sugar. How do I convert this to weight %? I'm thinking I need to use the density, but does it have to be the density of the sugar solution or density of water (I'm not even sure if the sugar is dissolved in water- it looks like brown viscous liquid from the refinery)? Thanks in advance.

Need more details please.

Edited by studiot
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6 hours ago, Ruthie said:

Hello all,

I have a solution from a sugar refinery and I know the concentrate (in g/L) of the sugar. How do I convert this to weight %? I'm thinking I need to use the density, but does it have to be the density of the sugar solution or density of water (I'm not even sure if the sugar is dissolved in water- it looks like brown viscous liquid from the refinery)? Thanks in advance.

If the solution is clear, i.e. not turbid, then the sugar is fully dissolved. But you raise a nice point. If the g/l figure you have been given was determined as the mass of sugar that was added to a known volume of pure water, when the solution was made up, then you can use the density of water. If it is the mass of sugar per unit volume of solution, then you will need to use the density of the solution. So you will have to get out a hydrometer to measure that, I suppose. Can you determine on which basis the g/l figure is derived? 

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16 hours ago, exchemist said:

If the solution is clear, i.e. not turbid, then the sugar is fully dissolved. But you raise a nice point. If the g/l figure you have been given was determined as the mass of sugar that was added to a known volume of pure water, when the solution was made up, then you can use the density of water. If it is the mass of sugar per unit volume of solution, then you will need to use the density of the solution. So you will have to get out a hydrometer to measure that, I suppose. Can you determine on which basis the g/l figure is derived? 

Hi! It is the mass of sugar per unit volume of the solution. So that means I should need the density of the solution right? Thanks for your explanation it makes it much more clear!

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