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Induction Tube furnace, and measuring temperature


Magic_Mercury
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Good day,

I hope im posting this in the right area.. it my first time making a post on the forum!

I was wondering someone can enlighten me a bit on the following subject .

I'm thinking of making a tube furnace for some lab work, as these things are way way to expensive to buy, and it should not be all that difficult to building one.
I have seen a few ppl make tube furnaces using nichrome or kanthal wire (resistive heating), this is super simple, but this wire will need to be replaced every so often, so i was thinking a more permanent solution would be to use a induction coil to heat a graphite tube (used as heating element), with a inner ceramic tube that would contain the samples to be heated..

I was just wondering if a thermal couple would still work inside a induction furnace..? as its hes a conductive/light magnetic casing,  would grounding the thermal couple casing be enough to prevent the direct heating of the outer casing or ferrous material where the thermal couple wire is made from..?
or could a high enough freq be enough to not allow the current to penetrate deep enough into the sample area (skin effect), so that this would not be problem at all.


kind regards

 

 

 



 

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We use induction heaters at my work to convert liquid white/yellow phosphorus to red phosphorus at 270o C.

The vessel is not enclosed by the induction heaters, as an agitator provides temperature and red phosphorus distribution, and thermocouples seem to work quite well in areas away from the heaters.

Sorry I cannot ffer any help for your particular situation.

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On 8/2/2022 at 12:44 AM, MigL said:

We use induction heaters at my work to convert liquid white/yellow phosphorus to red phosphorus at 270o C.

The vessel is not enclosed by the induction heaters, as an agitator provides temperature and red phosphorus distribution, and thermocouples seem to work quite well in areas away from the heaters.

Sorry I cannot ffer any help for your particular situation.

Olah! Thank you for your response!


Is see. im not sure if i can keep the themocouple away from the element, as its all quite small. 
what i did read is higher freq do help, so might just go to 500khz and try and see if it heats the thermocouple in any meaningful way,
I could also get a pyro sensor,but these are expensive as hell in the range i would need it to be. and will cost me more then the build of the actual oven, although still cheap compared to buying one.

i will do some experiments, and try and figure out if there is a way to use a themocouple inside the coils field itself.

thx!

 

 

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