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Carl Fredrik Ahl

Genes That Affect Metabolic Rate

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Hi,

I know that some people have higher metabolic rate than others aside from exercising and diet. Genes play an important role and I would like to know what genes and how those genes affect the metabolic rate. I haven't find so much when I searched for it.

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Probably going to be quite difficult to find individual genes, although you could take a look at GWAS studies regarding basal energy expenditure. GWAS studies are a way of correlating genes to specific traits, as in cases such as metabolic rate/energy expenditure, the trait is too complex to have a single or a few genes which are important. Additionally it could be that variant X of  gene1 increases energy expenditure in people with variant Y of gene2 but decreases expenditure in people with variant Z of gene2. This is probably less likely to happen than compounding effects, but since cellular networks are highly dynamic/complex, it is likely that it happens sometimes and it makes it a lot more difficult to search for specific genes/mutations that affect a complex/emergent trait.

I did quick search and found some articles, but I haven't checked them for relevancy (only their titles appear relevant at the moment). I hope this helps or at least gets you started in your literature search (if you can't open an article, remember that sci-hub exists (although check whether or not you want to acquire your PDF there (legality/piracy reasons)), or send the authors an email, they will most likely send you their paper for free if you ask.

Kind regards,
Dagl

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5381071/pdf/40608_2017_Article_145.pdf
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0145-5

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6072034/pdf/pone.0201555.pdf
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201555

http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/28/1/35.pdf
doi: 10.6133/apjcn.201903_28(1).0006

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/resting-energy-expenditure

https://e-nrp.org/DOIx.php?id=10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115
https://doi.org/10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408399309527631
https://doi.org/10.1080/10408399309527631

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On 1/10/2020 at 2:57 PM, Dagl1 said:

Probably going to be quite difficult to find individual genes, although you could take a look at GWAS studies regarding basal energy expenditure. GWAS studies are a way of correlating genes to specific traits, as in cases such as metabolic rate/energy expenditure, the trait is too complex to have a single or a few genes which are important. Additionally it could be that variant X of  gene1 increases energy expenditure in people with variant Y of gene2 but decreases expenditure in people with variant Z of gene2. This is probably less likely to happen than compounding effects, but since cellular networks are highly dynamic/complex, it is likely that it happens sometimes and it makes it a lot more difficult to search for specific genes/mutations that affect a complex/emergent trait.

I did quick search and found some articles, but I haven't checked them for relevancy (only their titles appear relevant at the moment). I hope this helps or at least gets you started in your literature search (if you can't open an article, remember that sci-hub exists (although check whether or not you want to acquire your PDF there (legality/piracy reasons)), or send the authors an email, they will most likely send you their paper for free if you ask.

Kind regards,
Dagl

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5381071/pdf/40608_2017_Article_145.pdf
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0145-5

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6072034/pdf/pone.0201555.pdf
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201555

http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/28/1/35.pdf
doi: 10.6133/apjcn.201903_28(1).0006

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/resting-energy-expenditure

https://e-nrp.org/DOIx.php?id=10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115
https://doi.org/10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408399309527631
https://doi.org/10.1080/10408399309527631

Thank you:)

Edited by Carl Fredrik Ahl

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On 1/10/2020 at 2:57 PM, Dagl1 said:

Probably going to be quite difficult to find individual genes, although you could take a look at GWAS studies regarding basal energy expenditure. GWAS studies are a way of correlating genes to specific traits, as in cases such as metabolic rate/energy expenditure, the trait is too complex to have a single or a few genes which are important. Additionally it could be that variant X of  gene1 increases energy expenditure in people with variant Y of gene2 but decreases expenditure in people with variant Z of gene2. This is probably less likely to happen than compounding effects, but since cellular networks are highly dynamic/complex, it is likely that it happens sometimes and it makes it a lot more difficult to search for specific genes/mutations that affect a complex/emergent trait.

I did quick search and found some articles, but I haven't checked them for relevancy (only their titles appear relevant at the moment). I hope this helps or at least gets you started in your literature search (if you can't open an article, remember that sci-hub exists (although check whether or not you want to acquire your PDF there (legality/piracy reasons)), or send the authors an email, they will most likely send you their paper for free if you ask.

Kind regards,
Dagl

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5381071/pdf/40608_2017_Article_145.pdf
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0145-5

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6072034/pdf/pone.0201555.pdf
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201555

http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/28/1/35.pdf
doi: 10.6133/apjcn.201903_28(1).0006

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/resting-energy-expenditure

https://e-nrp.org/DOIx.php?id=10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115
https://doi.org/10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408399309527631
https://doi.org/10.1080/10408399309527631

These articles are to complex for me to understand, could you plz explain a bit on a more basic level how one can have higher resting metabolic rate than someone else that have the same mass, etc. How does one inherit metabolic rate? What common genes are involved that affect this?

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An simple example I could think of is on the level of (brown)fat production. Brown fat produces a lot more heat than ATP, when compared with the usual fat oxidation (I think?) mechanics. Having mutations in genes with as a result increased brown fat production, that person would most likely also have increased metabolic rate.
When we look at people with overactive thyroids, we see that they use a lot more energy, so any gene that is involved in the thyroids function will possibly change basal metabolic function. On the cellular level, any mutation that leads to a less energy efficient enzyme, or less/more energy production will also affect basal rates.

If you want to know specific genes,  you will have to search the GWAS studies/data yourself, or maybe someone will feel like reading them and tell you, but I think the question is quite complex and a lot of genes will slightly affect metabolic rate, so its difficult to find causal relationships or even strong correlations.

-Dagl

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On ‎1‎/‎14‎/‎2020 at 3:57 AM, Carl Fredrik Ahl said:

These articles are to complex for me to understand, could you plz explain a bit on a more basic level how one can have higher resting metabolic rate than someone else that have the same mass, etc. How does one inherit metabolic rate? What common genes are involved that affect this?

Actually, physiological studies show that the differences in metabolic rates between those who gain weight easily vs thinner people are minimal. The real differences are in the genetics of the recruitment/inhibition processes. You may find my post on triglycerides interesting. ...Some people are more efficient at burning calories and store them more easily (analogous to "easy keepers"  among horses). Tyoe II diabetes (insulin resistance) seems to fall into this category, but that's a complex genetics situation, probably representing a common final pathway of many different genetic factors. 

 

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