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how is antimatter formed?


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#1 silverwind

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 04:50 PM

how is antimatter formed?does it contain negative energy?does it have negative mass?
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#2 dragonstar57

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 08:41 PM

how is antimatter formed?does it contain negative energy?does it have negative mass?

it does NOT have negative energy OR negative mass
as for how its formed i'm not as sure i think it happens in high energy atomic collisions.
these collisions cause it to release a electron/positron pair (an electron and an anti-electron)

Edited by dragonstar57, 10 November 2010 - 08:45 PM.

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please feel free to point out my grammatical errors. I would rather have them pointed out and be able to perhaps learn from them than continue make the same mistake.

It is not closed-minded to reject claims that make no sense. If you canít accept the possibility that an idea might be false, then you are the closed minded one. An open minded person will critically examine all claims but will not accept them if there is no reason to believe they are true or if there is reason to believe they are false.

however one must realize that every thing starts in a default belief and requires a burden of proof for the default belief to be abandoned. it would not make sense for believing in positive statements' validity so the only remaining is to not believe a positive statement until proof evidence is presented.

#3 IM Egdall

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 12:12 AM

how is antimatter formed?does it contain negative energy?does it have negative mass?


An antiparticle has identical mass but opposite electric charge than its corresponding particle. For example:

  • An electron has a charge of -1. Its corresponding anti-particle, called the positron, has an electric charge of +1.
  • A proton, of electric charge +1, has a corresponding particle, the anti-proton of charge +1.
  • The photon, with an electric charge of 0, is its own antiparticle.
According to the big bang theory, just after the universe began, the extremely hot, dense cosmos was filled with equal amounts of matter and antimatter.

But if for every particle there would have been a corresponding antiparticle; they would have eventually collided , resulting in the destruction of all matter and antimatter in the universe! Physicists theorize that there must have been a very slight excess of matter over antimatter immediately after the big bang. Based on rough estimates of the number of photons in the microwave background and the number of protons and neutrons in the universe today, scientists estimate that for every billion antiparticles, there must have been a billion plus one ordinary particles, leaving a single particle per billion to survive after annihilation. This single surviving ordinary particle per billion is what makes up our universe today. (The reason for this asymmetry is a subject of ongoing research.)



When an electrically charged particle collides with its antiparticle, they annihilate each other, and give off energy. The mass of the initial particle pair is converted to energy in the process, via E=MC2. The reverse is also true; energy particles (given enough energy) can convert to mass particles. Both these processes are commonly seen today in particle accelerator experiments




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#4 Janus

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 03:20 AM

it does NOT have negative energy OR negative mass
as for how its formed i'm not as sure i think it happens in high energy atomic collisions.
these collisions cause it to release a electron/positron pair (an electron and an anti-electron)


Actually, antimatter, is the form of positrons is emitted in the radioactive decay of some isotopes. This is the beta+ emission and occurs when a proton within the nucleus changes into a neutron and positron.

Such beta+ emitters are used in PET scans. The agent injected into the body contains such a isotope. The isotope emits positrons which then annihilate with electrons, emitting a gamma ray. The gamma rays are then mapped by detectors outside of the body.
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#5 dragonstar57

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 04:28 AM

Actually, antimatter, is the form of positrons is emitted in the radioactive decay of some isotopes. This is the beta+ emission and occurs when a proton within the nucleus changes into a neutron and positron.

Such beta+ emitters are used in PET scans. The agent injected into the body contains such a isotope. The isotope emits positrons which then annihilate with electrons, emitting a gamma ray. The gamma rays are then mapped by detectors outside of the body.

thank you I was unaware if antimatter's role in beta decay
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please feel free to point out my grammatical errors. I would rather have them pointed out and be able to perhaps learn from them than continue make the same mistake.

It is not closed-minded to reject claims that make no sense. If you canít accept the possibility that an idea might be false, then you are the closed minded one. An open minded person will critically examine all claims but will not accept them if there is no reason to believe they are true or if there is reason to believe they are false.

however one must realize that every thing starts in a default belief and requires a burden of proof for the default belief to be abandoned. it would not make sense for believing in positive statements' validity so the only remaining is to not believe a positive statement until proof evidence is presented.

#6 alpha2cen

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Posted 1 December 2010 - 12:00 PM

how is antimatter formed?


It could be created by atomic collision.
For example, antiproton is like this.

P+------------>2P+ + P-

The collide reaction is required very high energy particles.
After collision separaton and colling process is needed.
All of them are very expensive process.

Another sources are in the space.
High energy cosmic ray collision makes antiparticles.

Edited by alpha2cen, 1 December 2010 - 12:03 PM.

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Little is more.

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#7 Zarnaxus

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Posted 5 December 2010 - 08:22 PM

An antiparticle has identical mass but opposite electric charge than its corresponding particle. For example:

  • An electron has a charge of -1. Its corresponding anti-particle, called the positron, has an electric charge of +1.
  • A proton, of electric charge +1, has a corresponding particle, the anti-proton of charge +1.
  • The photon, with an electric charge of 0, is its own antiparticle.
According to the big bang theory, just after the universe began, the extremely hot, dense cosmos was filled with equal amounts of matter and antimatter.

But if for every particle there would have been a corresponding antiparticle; they would have eventually collided , resulting in the destruction of all matter and antimatter in the universe! Physicists theorize that there must have been a very slight excess of matter over antimatter immediately after the big bang. Based on rough estimates of the number of photons in the microwave background and the number of protons and neutrons in the universe today, scientists estimate that for every billion antiparticles, there must have been a billion plus one ordinary particles, leaving a single particle per billion to survive after annihilation. This single surviving ordinary particle per billion is what makes up our universe today. (The reason for this asymmetry is a subject of ongoing research.)



When an electrically charged particle collides with its antiparticle, they annihilate each other, and give off energy. The mass of the initial particle pair is converted to energy in the process, via E=MC2. The reverse is also true; energy particles (given enough energy) can convert to mass particles. Both these processes are commonly seen today in particle accelerator experiments






How do you know that the antimatter that we know as antimatter is not actually the regular matter and that regular matter, which we beleive we are made of, is not actually the antimatter as we know it. The question is, does the differentiation matter,, or antimatter?? teehee
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If only you could perceive time as I do. In my opinion, the existence of life is a highly overrated phenomenon. I feel fear for the last time.

#8 IM Egdall

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Posted 6 December 2010 - 04:16 PM

How do you know that the antimatter that we know as antimatter is not actually the regular matter and that regular matter, which we beleive we are made of, is not actually the antimatter as we know it. The question is, does the differentiation matter,, or antimatter?? teehee



Historically, the matter which is abundant in the universe (including here on Earth) was called "matter". Then a new form of matter with opposite electric charge was predicted (by Dirac) and discovered (in the 1920's I think). It was called "antimatter", and is very rare. These are only names made up by humans to label these things. But the fact remains that what we call "matter" is abundant, and what we call "anti-matter" is very rare. So the differentiation does matter! (Matter matters?)
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#9 ajb

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Posted 6 December 2010 - 04:33 PM

... discovered (in the 1920's I think).


Anderson discovered the positron in 1932 [1]. Dirac predicted it in 1928 [2].



References


[1]Anderson, Carl D. (1933). "The Positive Electron". Physical Review 43 (6): 491Ė494

[2]Dirac, P. A. M. (1928) "The Quantum Theory of the Electron". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Containing Papers of a Mathematical and Physical Character, Volume 117, Issue 778, pp. 610-624
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"In physics you don't have to go around making trouble for yourself - nature does it for you" Frank Wilczek.


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#10 Zarnaxus

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Posted 8 December 2010 - 12:55 AM

Historically, the matter which is abundant in the universe (including here on Earth) was called "matter". Then a new form of matter with opposite electric charge was predicted (by Dirac) and discovered (in the 1920's I think). It was called "antimatter", and is very rare. These are only names made up by humans to label these things. But the fact remains that what we call "matter" is abundant, and what we call "anti-matter" is very rare. So the differentiation does matter! (Matter matters?)



buuut, if you were to live in a universe in which there just happened to be another imbalance of what we call matter and antimatter, and what we call antimatter ended being more abundant, then a being from that universe would refer to themselves as the matter, and we would be made of the antimatter. This means that what is anitmatter and what is matter would be completely relative to your matter-antimatter imbalance during your universes big bang. So, i believe that matter.. antimatters. yyeaaahhh..... :eyebrow:
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If only you could perceive time as I do. In my opinion, the existence of life is a highly overrated phenomenon. I feel fear for the last time.




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