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List of naturally occurring gas and liquid molecules?


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#1 JSEverex

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 08:08 PM

I'm looking for a list that would give most to all of naturally occuring gas and liquid molecules: H2O, O2, CO2, N2, etc.. I am looking for molecules that occur naturally in one atmosphere of pressure in a relatively temperate enviroment. If anyone has any links to a site or sites that would have something like this it would be greatly appreciated.
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#2 Mr Skeptic

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 02:15 PM

Are biological sources natural?
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#3 insane_alien

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:08 PM

well the O2 comes from a biological source so i'd say yes.

Which of course means that there's an unholy mess of compounds that apply. listing them all would be quite impossible as there are millions of candidates.
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#4 Sisyphus

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:29 PM

A lot more than millions. There are about 20^50000 possible proteins alone. Though I suppose it all depends on what you mean by "naturally occuring."
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I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

#5 insane_alien

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:34 PM

yes but proteins aren't really gasses or liquids they can be found in suspension in a gas or liquid but are not usually the gas or liquid themselves.
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#6 Mr Skeptic

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:35 PM

However many of the proteins will be solid.
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#7 Sisyphus

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:44 PM

http://www.sciencedi...c058c2c2b34e55c

Apparently they're "surface-molten solids," for the most part.
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I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

#8 insane_alien

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:51 PM

which fall under the domain of solids.

are we done now?
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#9 Sisyphus

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 03:59 PM

And how do you know without observing them all? You'd need general rules for determining phase under different conditions. That would be more feasible and useful than a comprehensive list, which would have to be ridiculously long. In other words: I agree.
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I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

#10 insane_alien

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 04:33 PM

well a simple rule of thumb is that big ass molecules tend to be solid. as they don't have the mobility to be liquid.

proteins definitely fall under the big ass molecule catagory.also the intermolecular forces between them can be quite strong also rendering them less likely to be liquid or gaseous.

of course, there are some exceptions but they're few and far between.
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#11 John Cuthber

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 07:17 PM

There are a stupidly large number of liquids.
Listing them isn't a sensible option. The number of possible isomers of just the saturated hydrocarbons gets pretty big in a hurry. It gets much worse once the unsaturated compounds are added. IIRC there are about 2 dozen hydrocarbons containing 4 carbons.

Then there are all the possible alcohols, aldehydes and ketones.
The list isn't endless, but it's big.
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