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NaOH + CuSO4


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#1 NATT

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 01:45 PM

Bros i wanna know what will be the the result. I added NaOH with water and hope i made it saturated cuz i mixed em till nothing more dissolved in it. Then i put a piece of CuSO4 and they reacted very rapidly and the solution became blue and i saw a gas was emmited. Any Ideas?????
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#2 Melvin

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 01:50 PM

Well, the copper(II) sulfate would react with sodium hydroxide in solution; this gives insoluble copper(II) hydroxide and leaves sodium sulfate in solution. I'm not really sure about the gas, though...
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#3 NATT

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 02:09 PM

The blue solution is Na2SO4???
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#4 DJBruce

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 03:05 PM

The blue solution is Na2SO4???


No the blue precipitate is Cu(OH)_{2\ s}

The overall reaction is:

CuSO_{4\ aq} + 2OH^{-}_{aq} \rightarrow Cu(OH)_{2\ s} + SO^{2-}_{4\ s}

The blue in the solution is caused by the unreacted Cu^{2+}_{aq}

Edited by DJBruce, 12 August 2009 - 03:11 PM.

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#5 NATT

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 03:27 PM

I saw some kinda solid particals dipsoted in the bottom.... Are they Na... something

Merged post follows:

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No the blue precipitate is Cu(OH)_{2\ s}

The overall reaction is:

CuSO_{4\ aq} + 2OH^{-}_{aq} \rightarrow Cu(OH)_{2\ s} + SO^{2-}_{4\ s}

The blue in the solution is caused by the unreacted Cu^{2+}_{aq}


what do you think about the gas emitted?
Could u plz temme the whole reaction.......

what will happend to Na in NaOH
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#6 DJBruce

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 03:48 PM

I saw some kinda solid particals dipsoted in the bottom.... Are they Na... something


As you said you saturated the solution with NaOH_{s} it could be. If the temperature changed or you added slightly to much NaOH_{s} then some of it would not dissolve and would simply collect on the bottom. Of course in the above mentioned situation the stuff on the bottom would be  NaOH_{s} not  Na .

As a small side note their is actually no  Na in the solution their is  Na^{+}_{aq} . Although it seems trivial if there was actually  Na_{s} in the solution you would have a very violent reaction where NaOH_{aq} is formed

Merged post follows:

Consecutive posts merged

what do you think about the gas emitted?
Could u plz temme the whole reaction.......

what will happend to Na in NaOH


I left out the  Na^{+} in the reaction because it is a spectator ion, it simply stays in solution unreacted. If you want the reaction in it entirety here it is:

This is the dissociation of the sodium hydroxide.
 NaOH_{aq}\rightarrow Na^{+}_{aq} + OH^{-}_{aq}

This is the dissociation of the Copper (II) Sulfate.
 CuSO_{4} \rightarrow Cu^{2+}_{aq} + SO^{2-}_{aq}

When you mix them you get this overall reaction.
 2Na^{+}_{aq} + 2OH^{-}_{aq} + Cu^{2+}_{aq} + SO^{2-}_{aq}  \rightarrow Cu(OH)_{2 s} + SO^{2-}_{4 aq} + 2Na^{+}_{aq}

Edited by DJBruce, 12 August 2009 - 03:50 PM.
Consecutive posts merged.

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"To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the Gift."

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Help the children of Meknes, Morocco 


#7 NATT

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 03:50 PM

As you said you saturated the solution with NaOH_{s} it could be. If the temperature changed or you added slightly to much NaOH_{s} then some of it would not dissolve and would simply collect on the bottom. Of course in the above mentioned situation the stuff on the bottom would be  NaOH_{s} not  Na .

As a small side note their is actually no  Na in the solution their is  Na^{+}_{aq} . Although it seems trivial if there was actually  Na_{s} in the solution you would have a very violent reaction where NaOH_{aq} is formed


Merged post follows:

Consecutive posts merged
\rightarrow

I left out the  Na^{+} in the reaction becuase it is a spectator ion. If you want the reaction in it entirity here it is:

This is the disasociation of the sodium hydoxide.
 NaOH_{aq}\rightarrow Na^{+}_{aq} + OH^{-}_{aq}

This is the disacstion of the Copper (II) Sulfate.
 CuSO_{4} \rightarrow Cu^{2+}_{aq} + SO^{2-}_{aq}

When you mix them you get this overall reaction.
 2Na^{+}_{aq} + 2OH^{-}_{aq} + Cu^{2+}_{aq} + SO^{2-}_{aq}  \rightarrow Cu(OH)_{2 s} + SO^{2-}_{4 aq} + 2Na^{+}_{aq}


Then cant Na2SO4 or kind of that thing will produce by reacting 2Na+ and SO4 2-
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#8 Fuzzwood

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 03:58 PM

What part of the last equation don't you understand? On top of that, sodium sulphate is a fairly soluble salt, ergo it does not form a precipitate that quickly, considering copper sulphate is far less soluble and you will not have much sulphate in the first place.
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#9 DJBruce

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 04:01 PM

Then cant Na2SO4 or kind of that thing will produce by reacting 2Na+ and SO4 2-


No because all group one metals are completely soluble in water, and thus dissociate. Also most sulfates are soluble in water meaning that the reaction you propose would not happen.

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"To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the Gift."

"A lot of people run a race to see who is fastest. I run to see who has the most guts, who can punish himself into exhausting pace, and then at the end, punish himself even more."

 

Help the children of Meknes, Morocco 


#10 NATT

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 04:01 PM

What part of the last equation don't you understand? On top of that, sodium sulphate is a very soluble salt, ergo it does not form a precipitate.


:doh::confused::confused::confused:
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#11 hannibal

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Posted 2 January 2010 - 11:34 PM

Dear NATT!

I can't give you an exact answer, but I wish I could join your experiment! :-) We know so little about the concentrated solutions... Here pH is high, and CO2 dissolves easily: OH- + CO2 <-> HCO3- etc. So, it can be CO2, cause you disturbe the system. But it is more funny, if you put a smoldering stick where the gas leaves, and it begins to shining. The emitted gas can be oxygen! Copper is stable in Cu+ form in alkalines, cause the solution creates reductive environment. And the reaction between Cu2+ and some oxygen(II)-containing components can happen, by the reduction of the Cu2+ ion. And it would give you Cu+ and O2. Please examine the emitted gas! I'm curious... I will do it myself in 10 day's time...

happy new year, NATT!
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