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how does a prion reproduce.


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#1 tejaswini

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 04:27 AM

how can a protein coat reproduce. how is it transmitted?:-)
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#2 zyncod

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 05:55 AM

Say you have magnetic strip #1 that is straight left to its own devices. If you introduce magnetic strip #2 shaped like a 'W,' then magnetic strip #1 will also form a 'W.' The two linked strips continue the process of changing other magnetic strips from lines to 'W's.

The prion protein is a naturally occurring protein - the natural protein just needs the template of the prion form in order to turn into another prion protein.
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#3 zyncod

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:00 AM

Sorry, that analogy of the 'W' strips was not entirely accurate. To be fully accurate, the strips only become magnetic in the 'W' form. In the straight form, they are not magnetic, but they are still capable of being attracted by a magnet.

Essentially,

the straight form: a bendy piece of iron
the 'W' form: a rigid magnet
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#4 tejaswini

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 12:35 PM

thanks zyncod
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#5 prion

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:28 PM

ahh prions.... my specialist subject. I was going to launch into some detailed essay on protein folding, but I think the magnet analogy is really good! Normal, healthy prion protein (that everyone has) is made of alpha helices, 'bad', infectious prion protein is made of mainly beta-sheets. No one knows exactly (at the molecular level) how the infectious beta-sheet prions force the normal helical protein to change its shape, but experiments have shown that the normal protein definitely interacts with the beta sheet prion form and then changes its structure.
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#6 tejaswini

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 02:11 PM

thank u so much prion
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#7 valour

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Posted 7 September 2010 - 03:55 PM

Pondering Prion, do you consider that this is a form of "reproduction" by prions? i.e., do prions "reproduce" in the strictest term of reproduction? Or do they just convert (like a religous zealout perhaps)?
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#8 lost_soldier79

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:52 AM

ok so, the PrP res technically reproduces by comming in contact with PrP sen, PrP sen then turns into a PrP res as well. There however is no exchange of genetic material, because they are both proteins. So, could it be possible to somehow reverse the roles of the prions?
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#9 MagicHamsta

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:38 AM

ahh prions.... my specialist subject. I was going to launch into some detailed essay on protein folding, but I think the magnet analogy is really good! Normal, healthy prion protein (that everyone has) is made of alpha helices, 'bad', infectious prion protein is made of mainly beta-sheets. No one knows exactly (at the molecular level) how the infectious beta-sheet prions force the normal helical protein to change its shape, but experiments have shown that the normal protein definitely interacts with the beta sheet prion form and then changes its structure.



"how does a prion reproduce."
I suppose prion here would reproduces the same way as any other human does.
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#10 immortal

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 03:14 AM

A chaperone is the one which misfolds normal proteins into prions.
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