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albertlee

Open Source...

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Is open source = open code???

 

By the way, if we get a program, you could already see its code through assembly language, why need open source??

 

Albert

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open source means that the code is open to everyone, everyone can see it and edit it themselves.

 

an example of this is firefox or linux, where users can make their own 'upgrades' by writing more coding for the program.

 

as you say you can already see the code, but i dont think you could edit it.

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Whatever programming language the author chose to write the program in. Perl, Javascript, C++, Java... you name it.

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i know that off the top of my head because what?

 

i dunno, go to the website and find out...!

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when you say compile do you mean write your own one or read the current one you are running (like windows or whatever)?

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Will you have different output result if you compile the source code on different OS?? (but using same hardware)

 

if so

how?

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Will you have different output result if you compile the source code on different OS?? (but using same hardware)

 

if so

how?

 

The progress report as the comiler and linker build the project will probably be different.

 

The size of the executable will probably be different too.

 

The machine code instructions might/probably be different too, different compilers sometimes do things differently.

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Will you have different output result if you compile the source code on different OS?? (but using same hardware)

 

im not 100% sure what you mean... do you mean like compiling 'custom-OS1' on windows XP home and 'custom-OS2' on linux... you use the same code for each custom-OS, just you are programming them on a different OS?

 

if so it shouldnt make a difference as the code would be the same and as it is an OS you would have to load it from boot before the original OS you compiled your custom-OS has loaded, therefore it shouldnt make a difference... (does anyone understand that!???)

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Albert, you need to try a bit harder to fine stuff on your own before asking frivolous posts (if this sounds arrogant, it's because I am when it comes to computers).

 

Open Source means that the source code in whatever language used is open for anyone to view for no cost. Do not confuse this with copy-left or public domain. Look up the GNU General Public License for more info.

 

Most programs can only be compiled for one particular operating system and architecture. This is due to the different shared libraries and API's that each operating system uses.

 

When it comes to compiling your operating system, such as linux any programs necessary for installation are included as binaries (such as the gcc compiler or fdisk utility in linux) so that they can be used to set up the system and allow more packages to be compiled.

 

It seems like you are wondering about the Windows source code. This is very protected. You cannot "see" the source code either, since it comes as a binary file.

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Whatever programming language the author chose to write the program in. Perl, Javascript, C++, Java... you name it.

 

Perl and Javascript do not come compiled, since they are scripts. They are merely interpreted each time the script is run. In the case of Perl (which I am rather good at) a compiling-like process takes place, but it's not exactly the same. Java is usually transmitted as a binary file that is then further interpreted by the JRE, so to view Java source you will need to decompile it first.

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In java (which is the only programming language I use), the output, compiled file is always *.class file

 

so I assume, under Windows OS, c compiler compiles the code into *.exe

 

but when you compile a whole OS under Windows, will the file be still *.exe??

 

Albert

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.exe means any executable file. You can turn that java class file into one if you wanted. It is not reserved for C programs.

 

The thing is, you don't compile and run whole operating systems on top of windows, and the .exe is meaningless anyway because that is simply a way for the user to keep things straight. The point is that you have an executable binary file.

 

And yes, Windows basically is just a big .exe, but it comes in parts. You have your explorer.exe shell which utilizes the other libraries to give you the whole experience. That is why programs can replace your shell and make windows look all funny.

 

On an unrelated note, your avatar is stupid. No one likes looking at Bill Gates, especially with that stupid grin on his face. Have some self respect, man.

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The thing is' date=' you don't compile and run whole operating systems on top of windows, and the .exe is meaningless anyway because that is simply a way for the user to keep things straight. The point is that you have an executable binary file.

[/quote']

 

what do you mean .exe is simply a way for the user to keep things straight??

 

Secondly, then how are you going to compile an OS if you dont want to compile on an Operating System???

 

 

By the way, I just like to post up the top 12 most influential people of the century from the Time Magazine's website as an avatar... and I randomly chose bill gates

 

:)

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File extensions mean nothing; Linux barely even uses them. If you rename the .exe to .fag the same data will be there, windows will just give it a different icon (and wonder wtf you are doing.

 

If you were to make an operating system you would not be able to run it on top of windows as the operating system kernel would need to take over control of all the devices. You would need to create a new partition to install it and boot from, or make a "live cd."

 

Also, as I said in another topic you cannot simply take code meant for one operating system and compile it on another (in most cases with complex programs). This is due to the various ways in which each operating system handles API's and shared libraries.

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so, Silencer, how will "you" compile an OS, let's say, I gave you the source code of OpenBSD??

 

Albert

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Boot the openBSD cd. Run the installation program. That uses a c compiler binary to complete the installation by compiling the other packages.

 

Don't mess with linux gurus; we will pwn you.

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How about this, Silencer, you are not provided with a openBSD cd. All you have is the source code, and, let's say, a compiler on DOS or Windows..........

 

Can We still compile the source code??

 

I just dont understand, why you cant compile the source code in Windows, and then install it in partition???

 

Don't mess with linux gurus; we will pwn you.

 

you will do what to me??? :)

 

Albert

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pwn... the joke spelling of own.

 

You can't compile and run it on windows because the necessary OpenBSD libraries and API's aren't there! Not to mention the fact that you can't just run one operating system on top of another!

 

To install from source, you would need an already working OpenBSD system. Not like a newly compiled kernel is going to help you without one anyway. lol.

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thx for responds, Silencer

 

so, in brief, what is the process (do you think) of making OpenBSD from scratch by the OpenBSD os programmers??

 

Albert

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you mean, like, when it was first created?

 

They probably used the BSD system it was based off of and modified from there.

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