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In what order should I go through Math subjects?

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Basically, I've slept through most of my basic education, and now I'm lusting for some Maths. The problem at hand is this: in what sequence should I go through the subjects? I got CliffsQuickReview Basic Math and Pre-Algebra, and since I'm about to be done with it, I was wondering what should be next on my list: Algebra, Calculus, Trigonometry, etc. I would appreciate it if someone gave me a proper summary that spanned subjects and their sequences. How many Calculuses are there--as in Calculus 1, Calculus 2, etc? How many Algebras? etc. Thanks in advance. :)

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I'm not familiar with the QuickReview books, but one thing you'll need to do is see if you actually know the material; if the books come with math problems to try out, do those, otherwise, find a math workbook that you can try.

 

As for the order, it really depends. CliffsNotes has 2 algebra classes and 1 calculus class. Looking at their website, I'd recommend something like this:

  1. Algebra 1
  2. Geometry
  3. Algebra 2
  4. Trigonometry
  5. Calculus

or some other similar assortment. I just threw in Geometry like that because some Algebra II curriculums require it.

 

And as a sidenote: do the QuickReview books teach you sufficiently, or are they simply, well, review? They might not explain things as well as they could. You might want to get a decent mathematics textbook (and/or accompanying teacher's edition, so you have the answers to its problems) instead. Whatever works best for you.

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Thanks for the reply, though I have a couple o' extra question now: Algebra and Calculus are grouped into different classes depending on who groups them? And if I go outside the Cliffs domain, does the sequence remain intact? Thanks.

 

As for the material, the one I went through goes through the chapters systemetically and poses questions at the end of every chapter. I felt it's a real good book. :)

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Whether you're new to fractions, decimals, and percentages or just brushing up on those topics, CliffsQuickReview Basic Math and Pre-Algebra can help.

 

^From the site

 

I guess the description deviates it from being just review. I'm not really sure though.

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Ok. If you're learning from it, that's good.

 

From my experience, that's pretty much the basic sequence for a lot of things. Some people may use different names for the class, or have more classes, but that's the basic idea.

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It's a good idea to learn Pre-calculus before you take Calculus. By Pre-calculus, it means Trigonometry, Algebra, Radicals, Quadratic, Cubic, Complex Numbers, and all those basic things. OK? :)

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Personally, I taught my self Calculus before I knew advanced trig, it was only when the Calculus I was doing required further knowledge of trig that I learned it. I went Geometry, Algebra, Basic Trig, Basic differential and integral calc, advanced trig, complex numbers, advanced calc. I know, my order was pretty stuffed up, but I'm fine.

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How many Calculuses are there--as in Calculus 1, Calculus 2, etc? How many Algebras? etc. Thanks in advance. :)

 

The number of Calculus classes usually varies by institution. A typical division is:

 

Calculus I: Covers limits, continuity, symbolic and numerical derivatives, and applications of these topics. (Restricted to one dimension)

 

Calculus II: Covers symbolic and numerical integration, advanced integration techniques, Taylor series, and applications of these topics. (Again, restricted to one dimension)

 

Calculus III: Extension of differentiation and integration to n dimensions (with most of the time being spent on functions of two independent variables), vector calculus, and applications of these topics.

 

The above topics are sometimes shifted between classes, but usually maintain the same relative order, e.g., basic symbolic and numerical integration may be shifted to Calculus I, but differentiation is in all but the rarest cases, taught before integration.

 

Also note that the above structure is closely follows that of the text I learned Calculus from, authored by Edwards and Penney.

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