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Good chemistry books (Inorganic, Organic or General)


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Hi there everyone!

 

Can anyone reccomend any good chemistry books?

 

Thanks to woelen, I have bought the ones he suggested and have found them helpful - just wondering if there are any more I should look into :)

 

Cheers,

 

Ryan Jones

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"General Chemistry" - Ebbing and Gammon 8th edition

 

"Organic Chemistry - A Short Course" - Hart, Craine , Hart 11th edition.

 

i'm using these two for my university course and they are actuall quite good

£30 each though so its kind of pricy

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"General Chemistry" - Ebbing and Gammon 8th edition

 

"Organic Chemistry - A Short Course" - Hart' date=' Craine , Hart 11th edition.

 

i'm using these two for my university course and they are actuall quite good

£30 each though so its kind of pricy[/quote']

 

Thanks insane_alien! I'm willing to pay £30 for a book. I have paid upwards of $105 in the past so I think I should be able to manage £30 as I have my christmas savings ready to spend!

 

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0130143294/qid=1130784837/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-1351430-0470354?v=glance&s=books

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0618215387/qid=1130784874/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-1351430-0470354?v=glance&s=books

 

Are those the two you meant? I'm shure I can get them cheaper in the students store if those are the ones :)

 

Cheers,

 

Ryan Jones

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Indeed, try to get some older books also. Pre-war books are really nice to have. Especially if you want to learn a lot of concrete compounds (e.g. salts of all types, many elements, acids, bases) then the older books are of more use than the more recent books. More recent books give more information on principles of chemistry (and this certainly is very useful), but the older books give lots of information on compounds.

Pages of info on K2Cr2O7 (I mention this just as an example) can be very nice and can give many nice idea's for experiments you can do at home. From an experimenter's point of view the newer books sometimes are a little disappointing.

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@Skye: Thanks for the link I will have a look though those books!

 

@woelen: I'm working on getting some of the older books on your list. I'm looking on E-bay right now because like you said they are out of print :)

 

Cheers,

 

Ryan Jones

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General Chemistry by Linus Pauling. Good in depth explanations of many chemistry topics. - [url']http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0486656225/qid=1131063688/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/103-3007256-0599005?v=glance&s=books&n=507846[/url]

 

I have this one as reccomended by woelen :) (Its a great book 'm still reading it :D)

 

@olmpiad@ I'll look for the book. If I can't find it then I will have to ask the librarian to see if she can locate one so I can read it in the library :)

 

Cheers,

 

Ryan Jones

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I'm still looking for a nice, detailed book (or series of books) about the elements on the periodic table. All the books that are out there are just lacking in some things. I want a nice detailed description of the element, its discovery, its uses, the chemistry of it, the production of it, etc. etc. It seems that many books will give chapters upon chapters to the common elements, but NOTHING to the more rare ones. I'd like to know more about americium, cesium, dysprosium, etc. etc. I'm almost beginning to think that in order to get a book like that, I'd have to write one myself........ hmmm..........

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I'm still looking for a nice, detailed book (or series of books) about the elements on the periodic table. All the books that are out there are just lacking in some things. I want a nice detailed description of the element, its discovery, its uses, the chemistry of it, the production of it, etc. etc. It seems that many books will give chapters upon chapters to the common elements, but NOTHING to the more rare ones. I'd like to know more about americium, cesium, dysprosium, etc. etc. I'm almost beginning to think that in order to get a book like that, I'd have to write one myself........ hmmm..........

I agree with you. I also wish I had such a book. I have "Chemistry of the Elements" by Earnshaw and Greenwood. It is a nice book, but it covers the lanthanides and actinides only as a group.

On one side, this book covers very rare and strange compounds, on the other hand, it does not even help me with the observations I do in many of the experiments I do with my very limited resources. Why did well-equipped labs not investigate such observations? That is what really irks me.

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