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chamin

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About chamin

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  1. No I can't sadly. I don't think it was a study either, just a belief that some people had. I didn't consider it likely but now it seems pretty plausible, but still weird to think about. And yeah it seems like there are multiple definitions of dreams, as well as what consciousness/subconsciousness/etc are.
  2. Normally I consider myself familiar with sleep and its phases. For example I know that you sleep throughout the REM phase and sometimes nREM although the dreams there aren't as vivid. but a while ago I've read from people who believe that you literally dream constantly. Like even all throughout nRem sleep there are dreams, or at least dream-like experiences like night terrors and that could also be called dreams. At first it feels a little weird to think dreams are constant thing but it sort of seems to make sense when you consider you're right on the edge of consciousness when you sleep. What are your own thoughts?
  3. Another question is, where are experiences such as night terrors, etc. classified? Are they dreams, experiences, or what? How much is known about these anyway?
  4. That's what I was wondering, if there are any completely unconscious (or even simply dreamless) stages in sleep at all, or if the answer to that is known even. So far my searches (and even queries on other forums) have ended in a pretty wide variety of answers/speculations. And if it is true that you dream for all, or almost all, of the length of a sleep how is your temporal perception affected?
  5. well from what I know you have lucid dreams throughout REM sleep. and miscellaneous dreams in non REM sleep as well as dreams/dream like experiences (night terrors for example). so my question is how often do you dream. Based on what I read around you either. 1. Dream constantly thruout sleep. 2. Have either dreams or dreamlike experiences throughout sleep 3. Sometimes dream and sometimes don't dream. Which is it?
  6. Also is it just me or are there particular types memories that you can imagine later and others which you can't really "imagine" but can recall the factual details? And the former sometimes turns to the latter with time
  7. Well I have a few questions. 1. what percentage of your memories are false? Have there ever been cases where 50% or more of a person's memories are false? 2. Why are some memories of experiences you can imagine/visualize/etc but for others you only remember details but can't really/fully imagine them? 3. Why do people have false memories in dreams? eg sometimes I have perfectly clear false memories and experiences of recollection in my dreams that are not true.
  8. So theoretically speaking, what would an alkali bath feel like? Also, what exactly is an alkali bath even? As I understand, there are just as much alkaline substances as acidic ones, and some are completely harmless to the human body.
  9. Theoretically speaking, however, is it possible to handle (for the brain) a potentially infinite amount of pain sensations of potentially infinite capacity or is there a limit. If one were, for instance, impaled while being burned/roasted alive would they just stop feeling either of the two? Or would they perfectly clearly feel both at once?
  10. Is there a limit to perceived physical pain, with a point where the brain overloads and you simply stop perceiving it? or does it just go to infinity (theoretically)? For example, if someone were subjected to an alkali bath (google it) would they reach a point where they simply stop perceiving some (or all) of the pain perceptions? Can you die from your brain/nerves overloading on pain? What about other animals (non-human) or organisms that perceive pain?
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