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nadaa34

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About nadaa34

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  1. At ground level, the air pressure measured with a barometer is 1000 mb. The barometer is lifted upward by a weather balloon. When the balloon reaches 2 km above the ground, the measured air pressure is 800 mb. Explain why the air pressure decreased. After the balloon goes up another 2 km (now 4 km above the ground), will the measured air pressure be exactly 600 mb, lower than 600 mb, or higher than 600 mb? Explain the reason for your answer. I know the air pressure decreased because there is less air above the balloon; so there are less air molecules pushing down on it. Im not so sure ab
  2. Im still confused as to why the rate isnt constant. Can someone explain this in simple terms please.
  3. The elevation at 0 meters has an air pressure of 1000mb, 3000 meters has an air pressure of 700mb, 6000 meters has 500mb. 9000 meters has an air pressure of 330mb. Why is the rate of decrease of air pressure not constant with increasing altitude? for example, it drops by 300 mb over the first 3000 meters of the climb (from 0 m to 3000 m), 200 mb over the next 3000 meters of the climb (from 3000 m to 6000 m), and 170 mb over the last 3000 meters of the climb (from 6000 m to 9000 m). Hint: the answer has to do with how air density changes with increasing altitude. I know that
  4. At ground level, the air pressure measured with a barometer is 1000 mb. The barometer is lifted upward by a weather balloon. When the balloon reaches 2 km above the ground, the measured air pressure is 800 mb. Explain why the air pressure decreased. After the balloon goes up another 2 km (now 4 km above the ground), will the measured air pressure be exactly 600 mb, lower than 600 mb, or higher than 600 mb? Explain the reason for your answer. I know the air pressure decreased because there is less air above the balloon; so there are less air molecules pushing down on it. Im not so sure ab
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