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Duda Jarek

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About Duda Jarek

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  1. Ok, I have finally looked closer (paper: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1140%2Fepjc%2Fs10052-018-5918-6 ). So basically they believe that B mesons should decay symmetrically to electrons and muons, but they observe slight asymmetry: ~15% more to electrons with 3.1 sigma (~1/1000). Mesons is huge family: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mesons Beside kaons (~500Mev), we mainly know pions: charged have ~140Mev, ~10^-8s lifetime, mainly decay to muon + neutrino ... but also have rare decay to electron + neutrino ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pion#Charged_pion_de
  2. studiot, thanks, probably as usual it is matter of adding/modifying terms to Lagrangian - in practice used in perturbative approximation, literally adding terms to Taylor expansion. But this is description not understanding, neglecting basic questions like of field configuration behind given Feynman diagram, mean energy of fields in given distance from electron etc. Or renormalization literally subtracts infinite energy by hand - where exactly it subtracts it? Shouldn't it in fact subtract some energy density - from e.g. energy density of electric field, to make it integrate to finit
  3. There are more long-range interactions for liquid crystals, e.g.: dipole-dipole: "Novel Colloidal Interactions in Anisotropic Fluids" https://science.sciencemag.org/content/275/5307/1770 Coulomb (!): "Coulomb-like interaction in nematic emulsions induced by external torques exerted on the colloids" https://journals.aps.org/pre/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevE.76.011707 Skyrme models are for strong interaction ... so why can't we model all? These liquid crystal systems are for uniaxial nematic - one distinguished axis everywhere ... bringing a question about natural generali
  4. Another long-range interaction in liquid crystal paper: "Long-range forces and aggregation of colloid particles in a nematic liquid crystal": https://journals.aps.org/pre/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevE.55.2958 This time V ~ 1/d^5, highly anisotropic ... like quadrupole-quadrupole interaction.
  5. I can respond tomorrow, but in sine-Gordon the field can be interpreted as of phases of these penulums in lattice - with minimum of gravitational potential every 2pi. For Couder and other hydrodynamical QM analogues (Casimir, Aharonov-Bohm etc.), here are gathered materials: https://www.dropbox.com/s/kxvvhj0cnl1iqxr/Couder.pdf
  6. Energy density, Hamiltonian is a first step - convenient to start with as all the terms have positive conteibutions. It is often timespace symmetric - not distinguish time and space directions. But for solving such model we indeed usually go through the Legendre transform to Lagrangian - both for the least action formulation, and the Euler-Lagrange equation. I have tried to go this way for the biaxial nematic with Coulomb interaction, but it was too tough for me. Hamiltonian alone can be used to find static solutions, like this kink in sine-Gordon as minimal energy transition be
  7. Let me bring back my two responses, both are crucial for the model: The number of found particles is in hundreds/thousands now. Some are virtual, like 80GeV boson W in beta decay of 1GeV neutron - this mass should be rather imagined as only shape of energy dependence like for https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effective_mass_(solid-state_physics) What we should target (as configurations being local energy minima) are especially more stable particles and their decay modes e.g. from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_baryons ... and a general behavior in this table is decay with pion
  8. studiot, I had long fluxon response, response about baryons and strangeness - both disappeared. This sine-Gordon kink represents solution minimizing energy e.g. in lattice of pendulums: of phases while twisting by pi. But this is the most basic model - you can find it in hundreds of books and papers - please start with looking closer at external sources.
  9. Please formulate a question and I will try to answer. Sure the basic one is why I haven't moved it forward with simulations ... because the details are tougher than it sounds. To make Gauss law count winding number/topological charge as in Faber's approach, we need to define EM field as curvature of such SO(3) biaxial nematic field, then use EM energy density: as sum of squares of these curvatures. Below is such approach, using representation as 3x3 real symmetric tensor, with Higgs-like potential: preferring some set of 3 eigenvalues - shape of nematic in SO(3) vacuum. One
  10. Maxwell equations have this weakness of allowing for any real electric charge, while nature has charge quantization at heart - only integer charges are allowed (at least asymptotically: far from particles). We can repair this disagreement e.g. by making Gauss law count winding number/topological charge (Faber) - which has to be integer ... then its simplest nontrivial charge becomes a model of electron - the question is how to expand it to get all the particles?
  11. The number of found particles is in hundreds/thousands now. Some are virtual, like 80GeV boson W in beta decay of 1GeV neutron - this mass should be rather imagined as only shape of energy dependence like for https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effective_mass_(solid-state_physics) What we should target (as configurations being local energy minima) are especially more stable particles and their decay modes e.g. from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_baryons ... and a general behavior in this table is decay with pion or kaon to baryon with lower strangeness. As discussed, there are many
  12. In these models we have energy density (Hamiltonian, can be translated to Lagrangian) - usually with some spatial derivatives like stress, temporal for kinetic behavior, and potential (e.g. Higgs-like) ... integrating energy density we get mass of particle, usually scaling as in SR thanks to Lorentz invariance. Unfortunately it is quite tough calculation, I have attached for kink of sine-Gordon a few posts ago. We can parametrize with positions of ansatz configurations like hedgehog, Lorentz transformed for velocities, getting classical mechanics approximations ... with kinetic energy goi
  13. I again recommend sine-Gordon model to understand massive particles - containing rest energy which can be released in annihilation, also working as inertial mass due to Lorentz invariance ... and such particles can only approach the propagation speed c, at cost of energy growing to infinity, it cannot exceed this velocity. It is safer to directly target experimental properties like charge distribution - which is also suggested in this"biaxial nematic field" ... then interpret fractional charges as quarks, interaction between them as gluons and pions. Another big hint is deuteron -
  14. If you look at the big framework diagram above, for many reasons baryons resemble simplest knots: one vortex around another, proton/neutron should be such lowest energy pairs ... then they can form various size knots: nuclei (binded against Coulomb), including halo neutrons ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halo_nucleus ) stably binded in distance a few times larger than standard nuclear force. The external vortex loop enforces partial hedgehog-like configuration in the center vortex - proton can just enclose it to entire hedgehog, what means +1 topological charge - corresponding to element
  15. @joigus, these are matters of interpretation, e.g. in perturbative QED interpretation Coulomb interaction is performed with photon exchange ... Should we really imagine some infinite sequence of exchanged photons e.g. between proton and electron in hydrogen atom? Or maybe should we remind that it is perturbtaive approximation - like expanding into Taylor series and representing terms of this series - where Feynman diagrams mathematically came from. In liquid crystal we get Coulomb-like long range interaction because the further e.g. opposite topological charges are, the l
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