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Kagi98JP

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About Kagi98JP

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  1. Hello again, everyone! Today, I present you all with a question about dilution and it's formula of C1V1=C2V2. I believe it's also common to see "M" in place of "C". My question is, "How many mL is needed to dilute a 100 mL solution of NaOH with a concentration of 10M to a concentration of 2M." I believe the answer is 20 mL: C1V1=C2V2 C1 = 10M (initial concentration) V1 = ? (this is the amount of solution that must be transferred, right?) C2 = 2M (desired concentration) V2 = 100 mL (not entirely sure why this value is 100 mL, but I think it is because that'
  2. Thank you so much! I'll definitely make the change over to scientific notation. I am just so hell-bent on visualizing everything that it'll take a bit of practice. Have a great day!
  3. C + O2 → CO2 mC = 2680 kg = 2680000 g mO2 =? mCO2 = ? MC = 12.01 g/mol MO2 = 2MO MO2 = (2)(16.00 g/mol) MO2 = 32.00 g/mol MCO2 = MC + 2MO MCO2 = (12.01 g/mol) + (2)(16.00 g/mol) MCO2 = 44.01 g/mol nC = mC / MC nC = (2680000 g) / (12.01 g/mol) nC = 223147.3772 mol nO2 = (223147.3772 mol C) (1 mol O2 / 1 mol C) nO2 = 223147.3772 mol nCO2 = (223147.3772 mol O2) (1 mol CO2 / 1 mol O2) mCO2 = nCO2 X MCO2 mCO2 = (223147.3772 mol)(44.01 g/mol) mCO2 = 9820716 g mCO2 = (9820716 g) / (454 g/lb)
  4. This is the exact question: I'm fairly certain 6.02 x 10^23 mol^-1 (Avogadro's constant) is a conversion factor.
  5. I understand what it means. I just don't understand whether or not 6.941 g/mol is a conversion factor. The question is worded abhorrently. For example, 6.02 x 10^23 mol^-1 would be a conversion factor, but is 6.941 g/mol one? You use the molar mass of Li (g/mol) to determine either the mass (g) or amount of moles (m), right? So is that an example of a conversion factor? A value, paired with 2 units (in this case g/mol) that can determine the value of another unit?
  6. Hey everyone! Super quick question. "Is 6.94 g/mol Li a conversion factor?" I'm just unsure of what the answer could be. I assume it is because you use the molar mass to determine the mass of a substance? Thanks for the help!
  7. Hello, everyone! I have a quick homework question that I assume has some relation to the reactivity series? It goes like this: "Would it be a good idea to store a solution of zinc nitrate in a container made of iron? Why or why not?" I suspect it would be a fine idea to store the solution of zinc nitrate in a container made of iron because iron is less reactive than zinc and cannot displace it? I'm not entirely sure, as we skimmed over the reactivity series in class, so I would really appreciate a more in-depth and thorough answer. Thank you guys so much!
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