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Adamanator

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About Adamanator

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    Lepton
  1. Different buttercreams have different methods of preparation and different places of origin. Swiss Meringue Buttercream, Italian Buttercream, etc.
  2. The butter and cream are what I believe will go rancid. The sugar content does stave off that reaction to the extent that it can be left unrefrigerated for several days without issue. I do use a portion of shortening in the mix but since it leaves a waxy coating on the tongue it’s more to stabilize against heat and for decorating. I was only able to view the abstract for this journal which discusses the effect of tocopherol on butter. I’ll have to see if my library can help. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ejlt.200600089 I’m guessing I’ll end up with a mix of that and a salt based preservative.
  3. So far I’ve found that vitamin e (tocopherol) is an antioxidant that slows the decay of butter. Also rosemary extractives are being used as natural preservatives. I’m developing this product for eventual sale so while the initial packaging will be airtight, I would still like to have the three month window to allow a slight inventory cushion, shipping time, and time on the shelf in the store. As I research I’m learning that natural only means derived from natural sources, not necessarily processed in a natural manner. Doing more research on sodium benzoate now since most recipes call for a pinch of salt, I’m wondering if I can substitute a salt based preservative. Thanks for the replies friends.
  4. Hello all! Let me begin by saying I am not a scientist. I’m just smart enough to know when I need help from those smarter than me. I’m attempting to extend the (refrigerated) life of my American buttercream frosting from two weeks to about 3 months, preferably using “natural” preservatives. American buttercream frostings typically have about 1.5 c (unsalted) butter, 4 c confectioner’s sugar, a tbsp of heavy cream/milk., flavorings, and seasoning. Each different recipe would need tinkering and I’m not sure where to begin. I’m willing to research but keep in mind I barely made it out of college chemistry with a “C” so if you can explain things to me like I’m your dumbest group partner I’d appreciate it. Also any recommendations for Intro to Food Chemistry resources (i.e. kind of non-technical to begin) would be appreciated.
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