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forex10

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  1. Apparently as you can determine from the article I have posted (below), this research has continued, with good progress being made. While encryption is an important innovation, I believe it does not even scratch the surface as to what can be done with large scale entanglement. I do not quite understand how making a measurement results in an entanglement, but if I could visit the research lab & observe first hand these experiments I would have a better understanding. However I do not think this is a good time to go to China. 😷 Also I have tried to post this article in a way which will hopefully not violate copyright rules. JoeL Chinese researchers smash the record for realising two entangled quantum memories at maximum distance Quantum entanglement can be used to create encrypted communications channels that are secured against hacking https://www.computing.co.uk/news/4010786/quantum-memories-maximum-distance
  2. Hello, I did not find any follow up on the research being carried out in this article. This seems like it would be a huge break through with quantum entanglement. There could be several reasons these experiments did not continue, such as diverting funds to other areas of research. Hopefully some one knows something because I would like to find out more about this research. JoeL https://www.livescience.com/50280-record-3000-atoms-entangled.html Quantum Record! 3,000 Atoms Entangled in Bizarre State By Charles Q. Choi March 27, 2015 Scientists have entangled a record 3,000 atoms. Here, an illustration showing a large number of atoms (purple) mutually entangled with one another. (Image: © Christine Daniloff/MIT and Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT) Using a single particle of light, scientists have for the first time linked together thousands of atoms in a bizarre state known as quantum entanglement, where the behavior of the atoms would stay connected even if they were at opposite ends of the universe. This finding, the largest number of particles that have ever been mutually entangled in an experiment, could lead to more precise atomic clocks, potentially helping to improve GPS researchers say. The behavior of all the known particles can be explained using quantum physics. A key feature of quantum physics is that the world becomes a fuzzy, surreal place at its very smallest levels. For instance, atoms and other fundamental building blocks of the universe actually exist in states of flux known as "superpositions," meaning they can seemingly be located in two or more places at once. [5 of the Most Precise Clocks Ever Made] One consequence of quantum physics is quantum entanglement, wherein multiple particles can essentially influence each other simultaneously regardless of distance. Einstein dismissed this seemingly impossible connection as "spooky action at a distance," but numerous experiments have proven quantum entanglement is real, and it may serve as the foundation of advanced future technologies, such as incredibly powerful quantum computers and nigh-unhackable quantum encryption. ... Vuletić and his colleaguesdetailed their findings in the March 26 issue of the journal Nature. Follow Live Science @livescience, Facebook & Google+. Original article on Live Science. MORE ABOUT...
  3. Thanks for your responses. Although they were mostly negative they still gave me an idea of how it could work. One idea is to send a sample power packet to an internet address then at the other end the power sample could be amplified, thus not overwhelming the power grid or internet infrastructure. Now if this did work an entire book could be written about how it works & all of the applications, but of course I am being as brief as possible. This could be tied into the IoT. I am sure it will evolve during the 2020's. Joe L.
  4. Hello, I would like to propose the idea of using the HTML function to transfer power. We can already transfer data, images, & video throughout different points in cyberspace. I would not think it would be such a difficult accomplishment to transfer power this way. It would involve sending either small or large amounts of electrical current a few inches or to the other side of the earth. By using hypertext transfer protocol, power could be moved instantaneously with little or no power loss. So if any one has an idea of how this could be done a reply will be appreciated. Also please allow this message to be posted because I have done my best to comply with all of the posting rules. Thanks in advance for any responses. JoeL
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