Martin

Astronomy links

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Martin    416
Hi Martin' date='

 

Here you have another 2 links :

 

http://www.astrobio.net/news/index.php

 

...

Hello Alexa,

thanks for contributing the Astrobiology link, I was reading some of the articles and accidentally clicked on a picture of an earthlike planet and found myself in the midst of some kind of "terraforming" game or simulation.

could be intriguing. what you do influences the way the temperature and other conditions are going to go, you might get an iceage or a runaway greenhouse I guess

quite a few interesting topics at that site.

 

I couldnt get the European Space Agency link to work so I grubbed around and came up with this instead:

http://spdext.estec.esa.nl:81/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=1

 

If you have some favorite NASA or space.com site, I see no harm in mentioning something you found there and reposting the link.

some goodies may get lost if nobody ever repeats them.

 

Any time you want to try your hand at organizing the Astronomy links here feel free (radical edward set the thread up and there is no official librarian, whatever that would mean)

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Alexa    10

Hi Martin,

 

Sorry for that unhappy link.

 

I use MyNASA Home as you have the option to bookmark the articles you are interested in and save them in your account. If you go on www.nasa.gov and enter on the main site, you have the option to yours NASA. I found very useful to work this way with NASA's site.

 

On www.space.com you have the option to receive free e-mail news. So I do not need to access every time the main site as I get the new articles by e-mail.

 

I've checked for other links and lookie what I found :

 

http://fraise.univ-brest.fr/~kerrest/IDEI/Liens-nouveaux.html

 

 

Don't be scared for the French part. Go down on the page and you have all useful links on the world ! :)

 

Please check it and tell me what you think about it.

 

Alexa

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Martin    416

http://fraise.univ-brest.fr/~kerrest/IDEI/Liens-nouveaux.html

 

 

... Go down on the page and you have all useful links on the world ! :)

 

Please check it and tell me what you think about it.

 

Alexa

 

what I think...it is a page from the IDEI which is the International Space Law Institute at the University of Brest (West Bretagne)

 

what I think? It is nice to have very international collection of links. there are links from the space agency of Finland (!) as well as India and Brazil and Japan and every other place. Canada too naturally!

 

It is also nice to have a collection of links in French language and from a different perspective.

 

Alexa' date=' if you have the time and interest to organize pages of links for this little SFN board I do not see anybody stopping you from doing it. You and I have no official power to [b']erase[/b] superfluous material but nevertheless one can always gather/organize/repost. And so, if you have any impulse to serve as a volunteer information specialist (bibliographer, links-editor) I must say that I would welcome it even though I personally am not part of the management here and have no official position.

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Martin    416

Hey thales! you are in Australia! perhaps your neighbors will be able to see that clumsy rock Toutatis that is trying to hit us

but keeps missing

and will be in Centaurus on 29 September

 

Toutatis comes from the Comic Book of Asterix, which must be familiar to

Alexa since she is French-speaker and undoubtably knows the classics.

 

You thales could also organize the Astronomy links, if Alexa does not want to do it, or wants help. You have already contributed a lot of good ones.

As there get to be more links, someone should do it and i do not care who.

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Alexa    10

Martin,

 

I'll do my best to help you, but I have to confess something. I'm not a specialist in astronomy. I'm only an amateur who believes there is life out there into the space and I like to read whatever I can found to prove that. I do have experience as a documentation coordinator in a pharmaceutical company.

 

Oh, that's for sure I know Asterix !:D

 

What exactly do you have in mind with these links ? Do you want to use them as information source for the forum ? I thought it was only a personal interest.

 

Alexa

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Alexa    10

Ups, I've almost forgot about X prize competition on www.xprize.org

 

If you have the time to check this link, you realise the competition gets really hot.

 

The Romanian team has set the launch date for Sept. 8.

On Sept. 29th SpaceShipOne will have its first flight with 3 persons on bord. The Canadian Da Vinci team announced its first launch attempt on Oct 2nd 2004.

 

As I think you already know, the X Prize Foundation is a non-profit organization and sponsors a competition between private international teams to build a low cost and effective craft for space tourism.

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Martin    416
... I do have experience as a documentation coordinator in a pharmaceutical company.

 

Oh' date=' that's for sure I know Asterix !:D

 

What exactly do you have in mind with these links ? Do you want to use them as information source for the forum ? I thought it was only a personal interest.

 

Alexa[/quote']

 

I had a hunch you might have some librarian skills.

Also a thorough knowledge of Asterix is essential for anyone who boasts of civilized accomplishment.

I have nothing in mind besides the possible usefulness to people at this forum. Radical Edward had the idea to make this a "sticky" (see the first couple of posts). You can do as much or as little as you feel like doing or as you think is called for. A casual anarchy can also be beautiful.

 

I want to focus more on the Quantum Gravity links (see the QG thread in the SFN Quantum forum)

 

A general remark about link libraries: I am always forgetting where I put links. I like to have somewhere to look. I tend to find other posters words

more interesting and believable when they offer links to online sources which corroborate what they are saying. I assume other people expect the same of me. It raises the level of discussion to have a bunch of links handy, even if they only rarely get used.

 

You are very nice to talk with me about this and show interest in helping.

Now let us talk about more interesting stuff:

... I'm only an amateur who believes there is life out there into the space and I like to read whatever I can found to prove that...

 

Yes, this is a very real possibility and an intriguing prospect. I applaud your belief.

And even if there is no other life nearby it would be interesting to plant some. If we could find a potentially fertile planet.

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Martin    416

Dark matter is an issue

these people made what they think is a colored map of the dark matter density in a cluster of galaxies, it helps to hold the cluster together.

help explains the gravitational lensing of things behind the cluster whose light is bent by it

helps explain how the individual galaxies can be moving randomly pretty fast and still stay grouped

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=33508

 

there is the map

the dark matter is in blue and the other stuff in white

the blue is imagined and superimposed on the real photograph

 

there is a technical paper that goes with this

A WIDE FIELD HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE STUDY OF THE CLUSTER CL0024+1654 AT Z = 0.4 II: THE CLUSTER MASS DISTRIBUTION Jean-Paul Kneib, Patrick Hudelot, Richard S. Ellis, Tommaso Treu, Graham P. Smith, Phil Marshall, Oliver Czoske, Ian Smail & Priya Natarajan

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0307299

or alternatively

http://www.astro.caltech.edu/~tt/0024/CL0024II.pdf

 

a further paper by Jean-Paul Kneib about mapping dark matter by observing lensing by a cluster of galaxies

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0406282

(Kneib is at the Midi-Pyrennee Observatory and also Caltech)

see especially figure 3 here, it is like "X-ray vision" of the dark matter

residing in a cluster of galaxies---funnylooking

 

index to more of popular press release

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=33507

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Alexa    10

WOW Martin,

 

I have checked the quantum gravity and you have quite a collection of links there.

 

In my opinion, we can let all the quantum gravity together (if I can find other links, I'll just add them there) and continue with astronomy links (more general information) here. Once we have a good data base, we'll be able to re-organize them to make an easier navigation through it.

 

Alexa

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Alexa    10

Hi Thales,

 

I really like your notes about the links you gave earlier.

 

I'll try to find as many useful links as I can. Please feel free to add your comments on it.

 

Thanks,

 

Alexa :)

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Alexa    10

NOTE :

 

The following post is a summary of all the links I could find for this thread. As I consider this as a team work, don't be suprised if you recognize your participation here.

 

Please feel free to comment the presentation form. If you have any idea to improve it, just pick the thread and add whatever you consider useful for a future utilisation.

 

I saw there is a lot of interest on dark energy, so you can find some articles on Hot topics section. If you are interested in onother topic, let me know or add the link by yourself.

 

I do not consider this as a finished presentation. I'm sure there are other useful links on the net. :D

 

Thanks,

 

 

Alexa

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Alexa    10

USEFUL LINKS

 

 

 

 

  • Cosmology websites and FAQ given by SFN members
  • Other sites and forums
  • Magazines, Science & Technology
  • Hot topics
  • Vary articles available on the net

  • Cosmology website and FAQ given by SFN members :

 

Ned Wright's cosmology website and FAQ. He teaches the undergrad and graduate level courses in cosmology at UCLA and is also one of the team in charge of the WMAP satellite observing the CMB.

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmology_faq.html

 

Wendy Freedman and Michael Turner's "Measuring and Understanding

the Universe" : http://arxiv.org/astro-ph/0308418

 

Note : a lot of good astronomy links are graphic rather than verbal, such as images from the HST and computer animations, also Ned Wright has a calculator that lets you calculate from something's red shift how far away it is.

 

 

Here are good online cosmology calculators :

- Siobahn Morgan's :

http://www.earth.uni.edu/~morgan/aj...ogy/cosmos.html

and Ned Wright's :

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CosmoCalc.html

Professor Murphy's online calculator(Johns Hopkins) :

http://fuse.pha.jhu.edu/support/tools/eqtogal.html

 

All you ever want to know about Nebulas:

http://astronomynotes.com/evolutn/s1.htm

http://blackskies.com/neb101.htm

http://observe.arc.nasa.gov/nasa/sp...h_contents.html

 

 

Here is a nice free star chart that comes out every month and it also comes with a list of objects to look for with binoculars - a large telescope: http://www.skymaps.com/

A good place for science books... Their Starry Night program is quite simple but would at least help you through the apprehensive feeling of not knowing what your look at. It also updates off the web the daily coordinates of several interesting objects each night, for locations all over the globe : http://www.whfreeman.com/astronomy/

 

Good place for WMAP data : http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/

 

Trove of stuff on relativity, it helps if you know roughly what you are looking for, and keep in mind that reading it on the web sometimes mean it has not been peer reviewed. Some of the ideas in here (^that link^) are misleading, but its still a very good challenge trying to grip some of the concepts laid out : http://relativity.livingreviews.org/Forms/search.html

 

While at first a ghastly sight to look at the links in the light green are a good place to start surfing to try and skim some knowledge off the information superhighway! http://academics.hamilton.edu/physi.../resources.html

 

 

If you want star maps and much more for any location and time you can try the following program(A good graphics card with OpenGL driver is a must. (Geforce 4 or later) :

http://www.starrynight.com/support/...d&Submit=Search

http://www.starrynight.com/download...ownload-Win.zip (56MB)

 

To add stars to mag14 you can find them here. (just copy them in the right directory)

http://www.starrynight.com/en/backyardfull.shtml

You do need a serial number to make it work

You can get a 15 day trial key here:

http://www.starrynight.com/digitald...al_download.php

(if 15day's isn't long enough to test it there are places to get a less limited key)

 

 

http://www.extrasolar.net catalogue of extra solar planets including minimum mass, distance, and system

 

 

http://www.superstringtheory.com/ So what is string theory? For that matter, what the heck are elementary particles? Check out online courses. Black holes. History. Cosmology. Mathematics

 

 

http://www.bell-labs.com/org/physicalsciences/projects/darkmatter/darkmatter.html

 

Bell Laboratories physical sciences research

http://www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html

 

  • Other sites and forums :

 

Time travel Portal – an open discussion on time travel : http://timetravelportal.com/viewtopic.php?t=294

 

 

Amateur astronomy and telescope building forum:

 

http://www.njnightsky.com/

 

 

Futura Science Generation ; sub-forum Sciences de l’Univers (French) :

 

http://www.futura-sciences.com/

 

Agence Spatiale Européenne:

http://www.esrin.esa.it/

 

Etats Unis: NASA

http://www.nasa.gov

http://www.space.com/

Agence spatiale Russe http://www.rosaviakosmos.ru/english/eindex.htm

 

 

  • Magazines, Science & Technology:

 

http://www.astronomy.com/

 

 

http://www.astrobio.net/news/

 

  • Hot topics :

 

DARK ENERGY :

 

 

- Dark Energy: Astronomers Still 'Clueless' About Mystery Force Pushing Galaxies Apart, by Andrew Chaikin

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/cosmic_darknrg_020115-1.html

 

- Astrophysics Challenged By Dark Energy Finding, By Ray Villard

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/generalscience/darkenergy_folo_010410.html

 

- Galaxies Made of Nothing? New Theory of Mysterious Dark Matter

By Robert Roy Britt

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_galaxies_010105-1.html

 

- Scientists Map Dark Matter, Prove Einstein Right, By Maia Weinstock

 

http://www.space.com/news/cosmic_shear_000512.html

 

- Scientists Closer to Solving Dark Matter Mystery, By Patricia Reaney

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_matter_wg.html

 

- Feeling Around for Dark Matter By Matthew Fordahl -AP Science Writer

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/generalscience/dark_matter_000405_wg.html

 

- 'Groundbreaking' Discovery: First Direct Observation of Dark Matter

By Robert Roy Britt

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/missing_matter_found_010322-1.html

 

 

- Understanding Dark Matter and Light Energy, By Robert Roy Britt

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_matter_sidebar_010105.html

 

 

 

BLACK HOLES :

 

 

- Black Holes Could Be Major Power Source, By Deborah Zabarenko

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/blackholes_energy_wg.html

 

Several articles about black holes, most recent stories at top

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/headlines-4.html

 

 

 

  • Vary articles available on the net :

 

Here you have a good link which is a star map with the Microwave Background dipole temperature variation superimposed

 

http://aether.lbl.gov/www/projects/u2/

 

 

Here's some pedagogical links for cosmology:

 

This article by Lineweaver (he was one of the team in charge of COBE

an earlier CMB satellite observatory) The second link has a PDF version that is more readable but takes more time to download.

Lineweaver's essay has been made into a chapter of a book now in press called "The New Cosmology" (world scientific 2004)

"Inflation and the Cosmic Microwave Background"

http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/leve...r_contents.html

http://arxiv.org/astro-ph/0305179

 

New paper of Edward Witten in latest issue of Nature

link to online copy (for subscribers) is in the 3 June post of Woit's blog

http://www.math.columbia.edu/~woit/blog/

paper involves dark energy (which is an astronomy/cosmology topic!)

and concerns dark energy, the Higgs mass, and electroweak

symmetry breaking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Martin    416

Hi Alexa, I see we have no animations.

there is an animation by someone at univ. colorado which shows what it would look like to someone who is falling into a black hole.

it might be amusing (not to actually do it! just watch) but I do not have the link

 

here are some Ned Wright animation links however.

 

balloon universe expands then collapses

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/balloon0.html

 

why the particle horizon is 3X what you naively expect based on age of universe

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/photons_outrun.html

 

 

microlensing (gravity bends light from things behind)

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/microlensing.html

 

more lensing, by a cluster of galaxies

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cluster-lensing.html

 

 

How the bumps on the Microwave Background occurred: animation of what "Equal Power on All Scales" means

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CMB-MN-03/epas.html

 

I am happy to see you have already had some time to do some volunteer work on the links! Anything you have time and desire to to will be helpful.

 

About the animations. I suppose one of us (myself or thales or one of the others) could supply a little discussion to go with them. the Ned Wright animations are more useful if it is explained what they are showing.

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Alexa    10

USEFUL LINKS

 

 

 

  • Cosmology websites and FAQ given by SFN members
  • Other sites and forums
  • Magazines, Science & Technology
  • Hot topics :)
  • Animations ;)
  • Vary articles available on the net

======================================================================================

 

  • Cosmology website and FAQ given by SFN members :

Ned Wright's cosmology website and FAQ. He teaches the undergrad and graduate level courses in cosmology at UCLA and is also one of the team in charge of the WMAP satellite observing the CMB.

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmology_faq.html

 

Wendy Freedman and Michael Turner's "Measuring and Understanding

the Universe" : http://arxiv.org/astro-ph/0308418

Note : a lot of good astronomy links are graphic rather than verbal, such as images from the HST and computer animations, also Ned Wright has a calculator that lets you calculate from something's red shift how far away it is.

Here are good online cosmology calculators :

- Siobahn Morgan's :

http://www.earth.uni.edu/~morgan/aj...ogy/cosmos.html

and Ned Wright's :

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CosmoCalc.html

Professor Murphy's online calculator(Johns Hopkins) :

http://fuse.pha.jhu.edu/support/tools/eqtogal.html

All you ever want to know about Nebulas:

http://astronomynotes.com/evolutn/s1.htm

http://blackskies.com/neb101.htm

http://observe.arc.nasa.gov/nasa/sp...h_contents.html

 

Here is a nice free star chart that comes out every month and it also comes with a list of objects to look for with binoculars - a large telescope: http://www.skymaps.com/

A good place for science books... Their Starry Night program is quite simple but would at least help you through the apprehensive feeling of not knowing what your look at. It also updates off the web the daily coordinates of several interesting objects each night, for locations all over the globe : http://www.whfreeman.com/astronomy/

 

Good place for WMAP data : http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/

 

Trove of stuff on relativity, it helps if you know roughly what you are looking for, and keep in mind that reading it on the web sometimes mean it has not been peer reviewed. Some of the ideas in here (^that link^) are misleading, but its still a very good challenge trying to grip some of the concepts laid out : http://relativity.livingreviews.org/Forms/search.html

 

While at first a ghastly sight to look at the links in the light green are a good place to start surfing to try and skim some knowledge off the information superhighway! http://academics.hamilton.edu/physi.../resources.html

 

If you want star maps and much more for any location and time you can try the following program(A good graphics card with OpenGL driver is a must. (Geforce 4 or later) :

http://www.starrynight.com/support/...d&Submit=Search

http://www.starrynight.com/download...ownload-Win.zip (56MB)

 

To add stars to mag14 you can find them here. (just copy them in the right directory)

http://www.starrynight.com/en/backyardfull.shtml

You do need a serial number to make it work

You can get a 15 day trial key here:

http://www.starrynight.com/digitald...al_download.php

(if 15day's isn't long enough to test it there are places to get a less limited key)

http://www.extrasolar.net catalogue of extra solar planets including minimum mass, distance, and system

http://www.superstringtheory.com/ So what is string theory? For that matter, what the heck are elementary particles? Check out online courses. Black holes. History. Cosmology. Mathematics

http://www.bell-labs.com/org/physicalsciences/projects/darkmatter/darkmatter.html

Bell Laboratories physical sciences research

 

http://www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html

 

Astrophysical QuickView (AQV) - http://www.dreamscape.com/biology/

 

This is a collection of informative quick summaries of new press releases dealing with astrophysics, cosmology, astronomy, and space exploration.

 

Atlas of the Universe - http://anzwers.org/free/universe/

 

Contains 3D maps of the universe zooming out from the nearest stars to the scale of the Milky Way galaxy and onwards to the surrounding superclusters and out to the entire visible universe.

 

Bert Dekker's deep-sky pages - http://www.bert.dekker65.freeler.nl/frset_home.htm

 

Astro-amateurs will find several drawings and observation-reports of deep-sky objects observed through a 6 inch Newton-telescope.

 

BinoSky - best bets for viewing the night sky through binoculars (BinoSky) http://www.lightandmatter.com/binosky/binosky.html

 

A guide to the best bets for viewing the night sky through binoculars. Images and maps on consistent scales, with consistent exposures.

 

Brooks/Cole Astronomy Resource Center - http://www.brookscole.com/astronomy/

 

Links which are useful to teachers and students of astronomy.Also, an Online Studyguide for the Wadsworth text: Foudations of Astronomy, Fourth edition, by Michael Seeds.

 

CCD Spectroscopy at Mais Observatory - http://members.cts.com/cafe/m/mais/

 

This site shows what an amateur with only modest equipment can accomplish in the area of astronomical spectroscopy.

 

CMB Astrophysics Research Program (UC Berkeley, LBL) - http://aether.lbl.gov/

 

Professor George Smoot's group conducts research on the early Universe using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) and other astrophysical sources. These investigations are directed towards realizing a variety of science goals regarding CMB.

 

http://adswww.harvard.edu/

 

The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a NASA-funded project which maintains four bibliographic databases containing more than 3.9 million records: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Instrumentation, Physics and Geophysics, and preprints in Astronomy. The main body of data in the ADS consists of bibliographic records, which are searchable through our Abstract Service query forms, and full-text scans of much of the astronomical literature which can be browsed though our Browse interface. Please note that all abstracts and articles in the ADS are copyrighted by the publisher, and their use is free for personal use only.

 

Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia - http://www.obspm.fr/encycl/encycl.html

 

This resource, maintained by Jean Schneider (Observatoire de Paris), provides updated information about the search for extrasolar planets.

It includes a Catalog of Extrasolar Planets

 

http://lheawww.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/gamcosray/legr/bacodine/gcn_main.html

 

The GRB Coordinates Network (used to be called BACODINE) system (1) calculates RA,Dec coordinate positions of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) detected with BATSE and distributes those positions around the world in real time -- a few seconds! -- so that other instruments can make follow-up observations in other wavebands while the burst is still bursting! (2) distributes locations of GRBs detected by other spacecraft. (3) distributes reports follow-up observations made by ground-based optical and radio observers.

These three functions provide a one-stop shopping network for follow-up sites and GRB researchers.

 

How to present rotation curves of Galaxies ? (Galaxy Rotation Curves) - http://www.equidem.de/RCAtlas/

 

An alternative way to present astronomical data by combining atlas and catalogue features: The Galaxy Wanted Poster. The Halpha and NII spectra of nearby spiral edge-on galaxies reveal next to their red shift velocities their individual kinetic fingerprints. Such velocity slices or rotation curves are correlated to the morphological properties of these objects. Based on a sample of 59 galaxies of the southern hemisphere a small rotation curve atlas has been compiled which allows fast comparison between visual and spectral observations.

 

IMSA Astrophysics Home Page (A high school course in Astrophysics) - http://www.imsa.edu/edu/astro/

 

This is a one-semester course that embeds technology and the use of the internet into the daily experience of the students. Course materials, assessment tools and philosophy, and curriculum documents are all provided through this site.

 

Interferometry Center of Excellence (ICE, JPL) - http://ice.jpl.nasa.gov/

 

The Interferometry Center of Excellence (ICE), at JPL, has been established to ensure the development and maintenance of a leading edge capability in optical and near-infrared interferometer astrometry and imaging.

 

Kepler Mission (Searching for Earth-Sized Planets) - http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/

 

The goal of this NASA satellite mission will be to discover and characterize earth-sized planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars.

 

Kharkov multi-wave station of solar monitoring (KHASSM) - http://khassm.virtualave.net/

 

Images from the spectroheliograph of Kharkov Astronomical Observatory (Ukraine). This station is designed to carry out a wide range of astrophysical studies of the Sun in monochromatic light.

 

Latest Supernovae (Supernovae in NGC/IC Galaxies) - http://www.ggw.org/asras/snimages/

 

Current list of observable Supernovae in NGC and IC galaxies.

 

Microwave Background Anisotropies - Physics - http://background.uchicago.edu

 

A series of online tutorials ranging from beginner to expert covering the theory of cosmic microwave background anisotropies.

 

Photometric redshifts (including HDF and HDFS) - http://astrowww.phys.uvic.ca/grads/gwyn/pz/

 

Includes a view of the Hubble Deep Fields with access to photometric redshifts of individual galaxies.

 

Planetary Nebulae Observer's Home Page - http://www.blackskies.com/

 

The web site for almost everything related to observations of Planetary Nebulae. Hundreds of images and over 1000 observing reports in addition to many special articles. Links to other PN related sites and databases.

 

SETI : Star Maps for visual use - http://www.memorybankinc.com/SETI.htm

 

Use the 68 star maps to find the location of the data you are proccessing!

 

SciSpy: Science Data Central - http://www.SciSpy.com/

 

Resource for science data collections, standards, formats, and tools with online catalog for free and commercial downloadable software, specializing in HDF and other formats

 

Solar Terrestrial Activity Report - http://dxlc.com/solar/

 

The Solar Terrestrial Activity Report has an overview of current solar activity as well as this activity's effect on Earth's geomagnetic field. The report is primarily aimed at radio listeners. Solar cycle and solar wind information is part of the report.

 

Space Astrometry at The University of Texas - http://clyde.as.utexas.edu/SpAstNEW/index.html

 

Present and future results of space astrometry carried out by researchers associated with The University of Texas McDonald Observatory and the Department of Astronomy

 

Sun, Moon & Earth Applet - http://www.jgiesen.de/SME/

 

This interactive Java applet displays the positions of sun and moon for any date, time and location on the horizon, and on a world map with day and night regions. The times of rise and setting, the declination, the Greenwich Hour Angle of sun and moon, the equation of time and more data are computed.

 

TOPbase at CDS : The Opacity Project (TOPbase) - http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/topbase.html

 

TOPbase is a read-only database system specially designed for general use of the atomic data derived by the Opacity Project. It contains energy levels, f-values and photo ionization cross sections for astrophysical abundant elements.

 

Wavelength-Oriented Microwave Background Analysis Team (WOMBAT) - http://astron.berkeley.edu/wombat/

 

WOMBAT is dedicated to understanding sources of microwave foreground emission and providing the cosmology community with estimates of foreground emission as well as uncertainties in those estimates.

 

What color are the stars? - http://www.vendian.org/mncharity/dir3/starcolor/

 

Chromaticity and rgb pixel color are derived from spectra for various stellar types/classes. Providing physically motivated colors for astronomy presentations.

 

Wise Observatory Monthly Astronomical Calendar and Schedule - http://wise-obs.tau.ac.il/~eran/Wise/wise_calen.html

 

Generate Monthly Gregorian Calendar with optional Moon Phase, Julian day, Local Sidereal Time, Sun Rise, Sun Set, Moon Rise, Moon Set, Moon R.A. and Dec.

Generate Wise Observatory schedule with observer name and instrument.

 

X-rays from Hot Massive Stars (XMEGA) - http://lheawww.gsfc.nasa.gov/users/corcoran/xmega/xmega.html

 

This site is a central location for scientists interested in the problem of X-ray emission from hot, massive stars. It contains a list of current observational projects and planned observations. Schedules of currently planned X-ray observations are also included for those interested in providing ground-based coordinated observations.

 

 

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________

 

  • Other sites and forums :

Time travel Portal – an open discussion on time travel : http://timetravelportal.com/viewtopic.php?t=294

Amateur astronomy and telescope building forum:

http://www.njnightsky.com/

Futura Science Generation ; sub-forum Sciences de l’Univers (French) :

http://www.futura-sciences.com/

Agence Spatiale Européenne:

http://www.esrin.esa.it/

Etats Unis: NASA

http://www.nasa.gov

http://www.space.com/

Agence spatiale Russe http://www.rosaviakosmos.ru/english/eindex.htm

 

http://www.astronomytoday.com

 

Astronomy Today has articles on astronomy, cosmology and space exploration, with a regularly updated sky guide plus the latest space news.

 

David Darling's Astrobiology Page (Astrobiology) - http://www.daviddarling.info/

 

Astrobiology discussions, links and books. A site with a strong emphasis on astrobiology and the search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence, reflecting author David Darling current areas of interest. In addition to a description of Darling s books, including his latest work, The Extraterrestrial Encyclopedia, the site contains hundreds of links to other sites connected with astrobiology, extrasolar planets, SETI and other topics related to alien life, FAQ s, a forum and a guestbook.

 

UK Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (UKSEDS) - http://www.uk.seds.org/

 

UKSEDS is the UK's national student space society. Take a look at our web pages for more information on our activities and how to join. The web site also contains information resources related to space in the UK and around the world.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

  • Hot topics :

ALL ABOUT DARK ENERGY :

 

- Dark Energy: Astronomers Still 'Clueless' About Mystery Force Pushing Galaxies Apart, by Andrew Chaikin

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/cosmic_darknrg_020115-1.html

- Astrophysics Challenged By Dark Energy Finding, By Ray Villard

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/generalscience/darkenergy_folo_010410.html

- Galaxies Made of Nothing? New Theory of Mysterious Dark Matter

By Robert Roy Britt

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_galaxies_010105-1.html

- Scientists Map Dark Matter, Prove Einstein Right, By Maia Weinstock

http://www.space.com/news/cosmic_shear_000512.html

- Scientists Closer to Solving Dark Matter Mystery, By Patricia Reaney

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_matter_wg.html

- Feeling Around for Dark Matter By Matthew Fordahl -AP Science Writer

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/generalscience/dark_matter_000405_wg.html

- 'Groundbreaking' Discovery: First Direct Observation of Dark Matter

By Robert Roy Britt

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/missing_matter_found_010322-1.html

- Understanding Dark Matter and Light Energy, By Robert Roy Britt

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_matter_sidebar_010105.html

 

ALL ABOUT BLACK HOLES :

 

- Black Holes Could Be Major Power Source, By Deborah Zabarenko

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/blackholes_energy_wg.html

Several articles about black holes, most recent stories at top

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/headlines-4.html

_______________________________________________________________________

 

  • Animations ;) :

Note : this section should be develloped soon.

What it would look like to someone who is falling into a black hole

http://casa.colorado.edu/~ajsh/schw.shtml

 

 

Balloon universe expands then collapses

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/balloon0.html

Why the particle horizon is 3X what you naively expect based on age of universe

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/photons_outrun.html

Microlensing (gravity bends light from things behind)

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/microlensing.html

More lensing, by a cluster of galaxies

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cluster-lensing.html

How the bumps on the Microwave Background occurred: animation of what "Equal Power on All Scales" means

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CMB-MN-03/epas.html

 

_________________________________________________________________________

  • Vary articles available on the net

Here you have a good link which is a star map with the Microwave Background dipole temperature variation superimposed

http://aether.lbl.gov/www/projects/u2/

 

Here's some pedagogical links for cosmology:

 

This article by Lineweaver (he was one of the team in charge of COBE

an earlier CMB satellite observatory) The second link has a PDF version that is more readable but takes more time to download.

Lineweaver's essay has been made into a chapter of a book now in press called "The New Cosmology" (world scientific 2004)

"Inflation and the Cosmic Microwave Background"

http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/leve...r_contents.html

http://arxiv.org/astro-ph/0305179

 

New paper of Edward Witten in latest issue of Nature

link to online copy (for subscribers) is in the 3 June post of Woit's blog

http://www.math.columbia.edu/~woit/blog/

paper involves dark energy (which is an astronomy/cosmology topic!)

and concerns dark energy, the Higgs mass, and electroweak

symmetry breaking.

 

http://www.astro.spbu.ru/staff/dikarev/valery/ering.html

 

The modeled E ring of Saturn is presented. The page is related to Cassini project, and introduces the research of the faint circumplanetary dust complexes to everybody.

 

Closer To Truth - http://www.closertotruth.com/topics/universemeaning/index.html

 

Closer To Truth television series and Web site brings together leading scientists and scholars to debate how the Universe began, and how it may possibly end.

 

Coded Aperture Imaging in High-Energy Astronomy - http://lheawww.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/cai/coded.html

 

Information about coded aperture imaging as applied in X- and gamma-ray astronomy: - introduction to the principle - specific details about instruments of the past, present and proposed future - bibliography.

 

Colorado Model of the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) - http://casa.colorado.edu/~sredfiel/ColoradoLIC.html

 

This web site provides information on the the modelling of the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) by the Cool Star Group at the University of Colorado in Boulder. A three-dimensional model of the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) is provided, as well as a column density calculator based on the LIC model.

 

Comet Observation Home Page - http://encke.jpl.nasa.gov/

 

Provides information on current (bright) comets including recent observations and ephemeridies. Images and light curves of current and past comets are also available

 

Comets and Meteor Showers - http://comets.amsmeteors.org/

 

This site gives the complete text to the 1988 book Meteor Showers: A Descriptive Catalog, as well as recent meteor shower observations. The site also posts a wealth of comet information from news of recent discoveries, finder charts, and ephemerides, to extensive historical information on individual comets.

There is a European mirror site.

 

Cosmic-Connection.com - http://cosmic-connection.com/

 

A resource for amateur astronomers and space enthusiasts -- worldwide. Astronomy links to international resources, current space science events, news and weather, glossaries, multi-media and educational sites for children with onsite language translation tool.

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Martin    416

This just came out today.

It looks like a good up-to-date introduction to cosmology.

the field is developing fast, so it needs frequent rewriting of

textbook type stuff.

This could be a useful resource because this guy Julien Lesgourges organizes his thoughts clearly and simply---I like his writing style.

See if you agree. Also he has lots of diagrams.

And it really is for undergrads who have not yet had a course in Gen Rel.

 

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0409426

An overview of Cosmology

Julien Lesgourgues

Lecture notes for the Summer Students Programme of CERN (2002-2004). 62 pages, 30 figures. Very basic conceptual introduction to Cosmology, aimed at undergraduate students with no previous knowledge of General Relativity

 

 

"While purely philosophical in the early times, and still very speculative at the beginning of the twentieth century, Cosmology has gradually entered into the realm of experimental science over the past eighty years. It has raised some fascinating questions like: is the Universe static or expanding ? How old is it and what will be its future evolution ? Is it flat, open or closed ? Of what type of matter is it composed ? How did structures like galaxies form ? In this course, we will try to give an overview of these questions, and of the partial answers that can be given today. In the first chapter, we will introduce some fundamental concepts, in particular from General Relativity. In the second chapter, we will apply these concepts to the real Universe and deal with concrete results, observations, and testable predictions."

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Alexa    10

Hi Martin,

 

I think the place for the last link about comology is in vary section. I'll add NEW :) for it.

 

I recommend PDF format. For those who want to print it, there are 62 pages.

 

You can learn about the Hubble law, The Universe Expansion from Newtonian Gravity, General relativity and the Friemann-Lemaître model, The curvature of space-time, Bending of light in the expanding Universe, The Friedmann law , The Standard Cosmological Model, The Hot Big Bang scenario, The Cold and Hot Big Bang alternatives, The discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background, The Thermal history of the Universe, Dark Matter, Measuring the cosmological parameters, Age of the Universe, The Inflationary Universe, Problems with the Standard Cosmological Model, etc.

Do you think you have some time to develop the animation section, Martin ? I'm afraid, I do not have the time for it. I'm senior member on another forum and I really like the atmosphere there. I'll be around only for you as you are the only one who make me feel welcome on this forum.

Alexa

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Alexa    10

USEFUL LINKS

 

  • Cosmology websites and FAQ given by SFN members
  • Other sites and forums
  • Magazines, Science & Technology
  • Hot topics :)
  • Animations ;)
  • Vary articles available on the net

======================================================================================

 

  • Cosmology website and FAQ given by SFN members :

Ned Wright's cosmology website and FAQ. He teaches the undergrad and graduate level courses in cosmology at UCLA and is also one of the team in charge of the WMAP satellite observing the CMB.

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmology_faq.html

 

Wendy Freedman and Michael Turner's "Measuring and Understanding

the Universe" : http://arxiv.org/astro-ph/0308418

Note : a lot of good astronomy links are graphic rather than verbal, such as images from the HST and computer animations, also Ned Wright has a calculator that lets you calculate from something's red shift how far away it is.

Here are good online cosmology calculators :

- Siobahn Morgan's :

http://www.earth.uni.edu/~morgan/aj...ogy/cosmos.html

and Ned Wright's :

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CosmoCalc.html

Professor Murphy's online calculator(Johns Hopkins) :

http://fuse.pha.jhu.edu/support/tools/eqtogal.html

All you ever want to know about Nebulas:

http://astronomynotes.com/evolutn/s1.htm

http://blackskies.com/neb101.htm

http://observe.arc.nasa.gov/nasa/sp...h_contents.html

 

Here is a nice free star chart that comes out every month and it also comes with a list of objects to look for with binoculars - a large telescope: http://www.skymaps.com/

A good place for science books... Their Starry Night program is quite simple but would at least help you through the apprehensive feeling of not knowing what your look at. It also updates off the web the daily coordinates of several interesting objects each night, for locations all over the globe : http://www.whfreeman.com/astronomy/

 

Good place for WMAP data : http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/

 

Trove of stuff on relativity, it helps if you know roughly what you are looking for, and keep in mind that reading it on the web sometimes mean it has not been peer reviewed. Some of the ideas in here (^that link^) are misleading, but its still a very good challenge trying to grip some of the concepts laid out : http://relativity.livingreviews.org/Forms/search.html

 

While at first a ghastly sight to look at the links in the light green are a good place to start surfing to try and skim some knowledge off the information superhighway! http://academics.hamilton.edu/physi.../resources.html

 

If you want star maps and much more for any location and time you can try the following program(A good graphics card with OpenGL driver is a must. (Geforce 4 or later) :

http://www.starrynight.com/support/...d&Submit=Search

http://www.starrynight.com/download...ownload-Win.zip (56MB)

 

To add stars to mag14 you can find them here. (just copy them in the right directory)

http://www.starrynight.com/en/backyardfull.shtml

You do need a serial number to make it work

You can get a 15 day trial key here:

http://www.starrynight.com/digitald...al_download.php

(if 15day's isn't long enough to test it there are places to get a less limited key)

http://www.extrasolar.net catalogue of extra solar planets including minimum mass, distance, and system

http://www.superstringtheory.com/ So what is string theory? For that matter, what the heck are elementary particles? Check out online courses. Black holes. History. Cosmology. Mathematics

http://www.bell-labs.com/org/physicalsciences/projects/darkmatter/darkmatter.html

Bell Laboratories physical sciences research

 

http://www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html

 

Astrophysical QuickView (AQV) - http://www.dreamscape.com/biology/

This is a collection of informative quick summaries of new press releases dealing with astrophysics, cosmology, astronomy, and space exploration.

 

Atlas of the Universe - http://anzwers.org/free/universe/

Contains 3D maps of the universe zooming out from the nearest stars to the scale of the Milky Way galaxy and onwards to the surrounding superclusters and out to the entire visible universe.

 

Bert Dekker's deep-sky pages - http://www.bert.dekker65.freeler.nl/frset_home.htm

Astro-amateurs will find several drawings and observation-reports of deep-sky objects observed through a 6 inch Newton-telescope.

 

BinoSky - best bets for viewing the night sky through binoculars (BinoSky) http://www.lightandmatter.com/binosky/binosky.html

A guide to the best bets for viewing the night sky through binoculars. Images and maps on consistent scales, with consistent exposures.

 

Brooks/Cole Astronomy Resource Center - http://www.brookscole.com/astronomy/

Links which are useful to teachers and students of astronomy.Also, an Online Studyguide for the Wadsworth text: Foudations of Astronomy, Fourth edition, by Michael Seeds.

 

CCD Spectroscopy at Mais Observatory - http://members.cts.com/cafe/m/mais/

This site shows what an amateur with only modest equipment can accomplish in the area of astronomical spectroscopy.

 

CMB Astrophysics Research Program (UC Berkeley, LBL) - http://aether.lbl.gov/

Professor George Smoot's group conducts research on the early Universe using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) and other astrophysical sources. These investigations are directed towards realizing a variety of science goals regarding CMB.

 

http://adswww.harvard.edu/

The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a NASA-funded project which maintains four bibliographic databases containing more than 3.9 million records: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Instrumentation, Physics and Geophysics, and preprints in Astronomy. The main body of data in the ADS consists of bibliographic records, which are searchable through our Abstract Service query forms, and full-text scans of much of the astronomical literature which can be browsed though our Browse interface. Please note that all abstracts and articles in the ADS are copyrighted by the publisher, and their use is free for personal use only.

 

Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia - http://www.obspm.fr/encycl/encycl.html

This resource, maintained by Jean Schneider (Observatoire de Paris), provides updated information about the search for extrasolar planets.

It includes a Catalog of Extrasolar Planets

 

http://lheawww.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/gamcosray/legr/bacodine/gcn_main.html

The GRB Coordinates Network (used to be called BACODINE) system (1) calculates RA,Dec coordinate positions of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) detected with BATSE and distributes those positions around the world in real time -- a few seconds! -- so that other instruments can make follow-up observations in other wavebands while the burst is still bursting! (2) distributes locations of GRBs detected by other spacecraft. (3) distributes reports follow-up observations made by ground-based optical and radio observers.

These three functions provide a one-stop shopping network for follow-up sites and GRB researchers.

 

How to present rotation curves of Galaxies ? (Galaxy Rotation Curves) - http://www.equidem.de/RCAtlas/

An alternative way to present astronomical data by combining atlas and catalogue features: The Galaxy Wanted Poster. The Halpha and NII spectra of nearby spiral edge-on galaxies reveal next to their red shift velocities their individual kinetic fingerprints. Such velocity slices or rotation curves are correlated to the morphological properties of these objects. Based on a sample of 59 galaxies of the southern hemisphere a small rotation curve atlas has been compiled which allows fast comparison between visual and spectral observations.

 

IMSA Astrophysics Home Page (A high school course in Astrophysics) - http://www.imsa.edu/edu/astro/

This is a one-semester course that embeds technology and the use of the internet into the daily experience of the students. Course materials, assessment tools and philosophy, and curriculum documents are all provided through this site.

 

Interferometry Center of Excellence (ICE, JPL) - http://ice.jpl.nasa.gov/

The Interferometry Center of Excellence (ICE), at JPL, has been established to ensure the development and maintenance of a leading edge capability in optical and near-infrared interferometer astrometry and imaging.

 

Kepler Mission (Searching for Earth-Sized Planets) - http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/

The goal of this NASA satellite mission will be to discover and characterize earth-sized planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars.

 

Kharkov multi-wave station of solar monitoring (KHASSM) - http://khassm.virtualave.net/

Images from the spectroheliograph of Kharkov Astronomical Observatory (Ukraine). This station is designed to carry out a wide range of astrophysical studies of the Sun in monochromatic light.

 

Latest Supernovae (Supernovae in NGC/IC Galaxies) - http://www.ggw.org/asras/snimages/

Current list of observable Supernovae in NGC and IC galaxies.

 

Microwave Background Anisotropies - Physics - http://background.uchicago.edu

A series of online tutorials ranging from beginner to expert covering the theory of cosmic microwave background anisotropies.

 

Photometric redshifts (including HDF and HDFS) - http://astrowww.phys.uvic.ca/grads/gwyn/pz/

Includes a view of the Hubble Deep Fields with access to photometric redshifts of individual galaxies.

 

Planetary Nebulae Observer's Home Page - http://www.blackskies.com/

The web site for almost everything related to observations of Planetary Nebulae. Hundreds of images and over 1000 observing reports in addition to many special articles. Links to other PN related sites and databases.

 

SETI : Star Maps for visual use - http://www.memorybankinc.com/SETI.htm

Use the 68 star maps to find the location of the data you are proccessing!

 

SciSpy: Science Data Central - http://www.SciSpy.com/

Resource for science data collections, standards, formats, and tools with online catalog for free and commercial downloadable software, specializing in HDF and other formats

 

Solar Terrestrial Activity Report - http://dxlc.com/solar/

The Solar Terrestrial Activity Report has an overview of current solar activity as well as this activity's effect on Earth's geomagnetic field. The report is primarily aimed at radio listeners. Solar cycle and solar wind information is part of the report.

 

Space Astrometry at The University of Texas - http://clyde.as.utexas.edu/SpAstNEW/index.html

Present and future results of space astrometry carried out by researchers associated with The University of Texas McDonald Observatory and the Department of Astronomy

 

Sun, Moon & Earth Applet - http://www.jgiesen.de/SME/

This interactive Java applet displays the positions of sun and moon for any date, time and location on the horizon, and on a world map with day and night regions. The times of rise and setting, the declination, the Greenwich Hour Angle of sun and moon, the equation of time and more data are computed.

 

TOPbase at CDS : The Opacity Project (TOPbase) - http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/topbase.html

TOPbase is a read-only database system specially designed for general use of the atomic data derived by the Opacity Project. It contains energy levels, f-values and photo ionization cross sections for astrophysical abundant elements.

 

Wavelength-Oriented Microwave Background Analysis Team (WOMBAT) - http://astron.berkeley.edu/wombat/

WOMBAT is dedicated to understanding sources of microwave foreground emission and providing the cosmology community with estimates of foreground emission as well as uncertainties in those estimates.

 

What color are the stars? - http://www.vendian.org/mncharity/dir3/starcolor/

Chromaticity and rgb pixel color are derived from spectra for various stellar types/classes. Providing physically motivated colors for astronomy presentations.

 

Wise Observatory Monthly Astronomical Calendar and Schedule - http://wise-obs.tau.ac.il/~eran/Wise/wise_calen.html

Generate Monthly Gregorian Calendar with optional Moon Phase, Julian day, Local Sidereal Time, Sun Rise, Sun Set, Moon Rise, Moon Set, Moon R.A. and Dec.

Generate Wise Observatory schedule with observer name and instrument.

 

X-rays from Hot Massive Stars (XMEGA) - http://lheawww.gsfc.nasa.gov/users/corcoran/xmega/xmega.html

This site is a central location for scientists interested in the problem of X-ray emission from hot, massive stars. It contains a list of current observational projects and planned observations. Schedules of currently planned X-ray observations are also included for those interested in providing ground-based coordinated observations.

 

 

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________

 

  • Other sites and forums :

Time travel Portal – an open discussion on time travel : http://timetravelportal.com/viewtopic.php?t=294

Amateur astronomy and telescope building forum:

http://www.njnightsky.com/

Futura Science Generation ; sub-forum Sciences de l’Univers (French) :

http://www.futura-sciences.com/

Agence Spatiale Européenne:

http://www.esrin.esa.it/

Etats Unis: NASA

http://www.nasa.gov

http://www.space.com/

Agence spatiale Russe http://www.rosaviakosmos.ru/english/eindex.htm

 

http://www.astronomytoday.com

Astronomy Today has articles on astronomy, cosmology and space exploration, with a regularly updated sky guide plus the latest space news.

 

David Darling's Astrobiology Page (Astrobiology) - http://www.daviddarling.info/

Astrobiology discussions, links and books. A site with a strong emphasis on astrobiology and the search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence, reflecting author David Darling current areas of interest. In addition to a description of Darling s books, including his latest work, The Extraterrestrial Encyclopedia, the site contains hundreds of links to other sites connected with astrobiology, extrasolar planets, SETI and other topics related to alien life, FAQ s, a forum and a guestbook.

 

UK Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (UKSEDS) - http://www.uk.seds.org/

 

UKSEDS is the UK's national student space society. Take a look at our web pages for more information on our activities and how to join. The web site also contains information resources related to space in the UK and around the world.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

__________________________________________________________________________

 

 

  • Hot topics :

ALL ABOUT DARK ENERGY :

 

- Dark Energy: Astronomers Still 'Clueless' About Mystery Force Pushing Galaxies Apart, by Andrew Chaikin

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/cosmic_darknrg_020115-1.html

- Astrophysics Challenged By Dark Energy Finding,By Ray Villard

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/generalscience/darkenergy_folo_010410.html

- Galaxies Made of Nothing? New Theory of Mysterious Dark Matter

By Robert Roy Britt

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_galaxies_010105-1.html

- Scientists Map Dark Matter, Prove Einstein Right, By Maia Weinstock

http://www.space.com/news/cosmic_shear_000512.html

- Scientists Closer to Solving Dark Matter Mystery, By Patricia Reaney

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_matter_wg.html

- Feeling Around for Dark Matter By Matthew Fordahl -AP Science Writer

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/generalscience/dark_matter_000405_wg.html

- 'Groundbreaking' Discovery: First Direct Observation of Dark Matter

By Robert Roy Britt

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/missing_matter_found_010322-1.html

- Understanding Dark Matter and Light Energy, By Robert Roy Britt

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/dark_matter_sidebar_010105.html

 

ALL ABOUT BLACK HOLES:

 

- Black Holes Could Be Major Power Source,By Deborah Zabarenko

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/blackholes_energy_wg.html

Several articles about black holes, most recent stories at top

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/headlines-4.html

_______________________________________________________________________

  • Animations ;) :

Note : this section should be develloped soon.

What it would look like to someone who is falling into a black hole

http://casa.colorado.edu/~ajsh/schw.shtml

Balloon universe expands then collapses

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/balloon0.html

Why the particle horizon is 3X what you naively expect based on age of universe

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/photons_outrun.html

Microlensing (gravity bends light from things behind)

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/microlensing.html

More lensing, by a cluster of galaxies

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cluster-lensing.html

How the bumps on the Microwave Background occurred: animation of what "Equal Power on All Scales" means

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CMB-MN-03/epas.html

 

_________________________________________________________________________

  • Vary articles available on the net

NEW :) An overview of Cosmology, by Julien Lesgourgues

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0409426

Here you can learn about the Hubble law, The Universe Expansion from Newtonian Gravity, General relativity and the Friemann-Lemaître model, The curvature of space-time, Bending of light in the expanding Universe, The Friedmann law , The Standard Cosmological Model, The Hot Big Bang scenario, The Cold and Hot Big Bang alternatives, The discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background, The Thermal history of the Universe, Dark Matter, Measuring the cosmological parameters, Age of the Universe, The Inflationary Universe, Problems with the Standard Cosmological Model, etc.

Here you have a good link which is a star map with the Microwave Background dipole temperature variation superimposed

http://aether.lbl.gov/www/projects/u2/

 

Here's some pedagogical links for cosmology:

 

This article by Lineweaver (he was one of the team in charge of COBE

an earlier CMB satellite observatory) The second link has a PDF version that is more readable but takes more time to download.

Lineweaver's essay has been made into a chapter of a book now in press called "The New Cosmology" (world scientific 2004)

"Inflation and the Cosmic Microwave Background"

http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/leve...r_contents.html

http://arxiv.org/astro-ph/0305179

 

New paper of Edward Witten in latest issue of Nature

link to online copy (for subscribers) is in the 3 June post of Woit's blog

http://www.math.columbia.edu/~woit/blog/

paper involves dark energy (which is an astronomy/cosmology topic!)

and concerns dark energy, the Higgs mass, and electroweak

symmetry breaking.

 

http://www.astro.spbu.ru/staff/dikarev/valery/ering.html

The modeled E ring of Saturn is presented. The page is related to Cassini project, and introduces the research of the faint circumplanetary dust complexes to everybody.

 

Closer To Truth - http://www.closertotruth.com/topics/universemeaning/index.html

Closer To Truth television series and Web site brings together leading scientists and scholars to debate how the Universe began, and how it may possibly end.

 

Coded Aperture Imaging in High-Energy Astronomy - http://lheawww.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/cai/coded.html

Information about coded aperture imaging as applied in X- and gamma-ray astronomy: - introduction to the principle - specific details about instruments of the past, present and proposed future - bibliography.

 

Colorado Model of the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) - http://casa.colorado.edu/~sredfiel/ColoradoLIC.html

This web site provides information on the the modelling of the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) by the Cool Star Group at the University of Colorado in Boulder. A three-dimensional model of the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) is provided, as well as a column density calculator based on the LIC model.

 

Comet Observation Home Page - http://encke.jpl.nasa.gov/

Provides information on current (bright) comets including recent observations and ephemeridies. Images and light curves of current and past comets are also available

 

Comets and Meteor Showers - http://comets.amsmeteors.org/

This site gives the complete text to the 1988 book Meteor Showers: A Descriptive Catalog, as well as recent meteor shower observations. The site also posts a wealth of comet information from news of recent discoveries, finder charts, and ephemerides, to extensive historical information on individual comets.

There is a European mirror site.

 

Cosmic-Connection.com - http://cosmic-connection.com/

A resource for amateur astronomers and space enthusiasts -- worldwide. Astronomy links to international resources, current space science events, news and weather, glossaries, multi-media and educational sites for children with onsite language translation tool.

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Martin    416

this page has some astrophysical constants given to high precision such as would be used in navigation within the solar system

http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/astro_constants.html

 

in the expansion of space it is very common to have faster-than-light

recession speeds, something that often puzzles people.

A remedial or pedagogical article was written by Tamara Davis and

Charles Lineweaver to help people get used to FTL recession speeds

and to understand that there is really no contradiction of Special Relativity.

The link is sometimes useful in discussion:

 

Davis, Lineweaver

Expanding Confusion: common misconceptions of cosmological horizons and the superluminal expansion of the Universe

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0310808

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MadIce    10

Astronomers from the Institute of Astronomy (IoA) in Cambridge, England have watched a bundle of matter at the heart of a galaxy 100 million light-years away as it orbited a supermassive black hole four times on its way to being destroyed. The material was approximately the same distance as our Earth is from the Sun, but instead of taking a year, it only took a quarter of a day, because of the massive gravity of the black hole. By tracking the matter's doomed orbit, astronomers were then able to calculate the mass of the black hole: between 10 and 50 million solar masses.

 

Astronomers Watch a Black Hole Eat a Meal

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Martin    416

http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/GC/images/movie2003.mpg

 

timelapse photography of several stars doing

various-shaped orbits around the three-million-solar-mass hole at

the center of our Milky Way Galaxy

 

the higher-resolution version (which takes longer to download) is here:

http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/GC/index.php

 

thanks to Sean Carroll's "preposterous universe" blog

 

I think you will like this, Alexa. Hope so anyway.

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